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Thread: What firearms brands in the 338 WIN & 375 H&H?

  1. #1
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    Default What firearms brands in the 338 WIN & 375 H&H?

    Howdy folks,

    I have been reading on here for a bit and just signed up, tons of great info.

    What brands do you folks like/trust in the .338 WIN & .375 H&H? I see a lot on the ammo to used, but what are some field proven guns?


    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by northernkid View Post
    Howdy folks,

    I have been reading on here for a bit and just signed up, tons of great info.

    What brands do you folks like/trust in the .338 WIN & .375 H&H? I see a lot on the ammo to used, but what are some field proven guns?


    Thanks
    My favorite would be a winchester 70 classic stainless. You can still find pretty nice ones used from time to time.

  3. #3
    Member akshootnscoot's Avatar
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    I was purchasing on a budget and picked up the .375 in a Savage Model 116 Alaska Guide Model. It's lightweight and has a short barrel, but I won't be stretching my shots out with it. 3 shots touching at 100 yds, and no complaints yet

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    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    Remington 700, what else is there? JMHO
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

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    First choice would be Ruger 375 stainless
    Second would be a Dakota 76
    Third would be a Winchester 70 Classic with the older style trigger last made about three years ago.
    Tennessee

  6. #6

    Smile well...

    Ask your self why it is that so many of the covers of gun magazines in the last 40 years have pictured the tried and true controlled round feed Model 70 Winchester and Mauser 98 actions. Could it be that they are very good and reliable actions that many pros who chase big tough critters trust to go bang when ever they pull the trigger and cycle the action? Or is the synthetic stocked Remington Mod. 700 rifle the best thing going? Pull the barreled action from the stock and look at the trigger, which one do you think would be the most reliable in inclement weather? Field strip the bolt on the Mod. 70, pretty easy to do with out tools ain't it? Choices...

  7. #7
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    I carry Push Feed and Controlled Round Feed rifles through the Alaska wilderness and never have a concern about their readiness to perform. The reason for this is that I am very familiar with every rifle I carry. I shoot as much as possible on my budget and practice dry firing when the money runs out. Any quality rifle should feed and function properly and if they do not it痴 more than likely not a design flaw, but an issue with an individual rifle which can be remedied if you know there is a problem. I've three Rem 700s that are smooth as glass, reliable as a claw hammer and deadly in the field. They will feed upside down, tilted right, left or at any other angle I can imagine and they have never failed me in the field. I've zero reservations about their use or performance regardless the game I知 after or might bump into while afield. They are just like a trio of PF Ruger M77s, or a PF Sako L61, or a PF Tikka, or a Pf Weatherby Mark V. All perform without a hitch and I would use any of them that are chambered in a cartridge suitable for dangerous game without any hesitation. The only way to know this is to shoot the rifle a lot. 20 rounds from the bench sighting it in is not a lot, though many guys think it痴 enough. One hundred rounds is not a lot, but few rifles get shot this much in ten years. If you really want confidence in your rifle you need to shoot it enough to know that it will perform properly and the only way to know this is to use the rifle enough to prove it, regardless of its design or maker.

    Buy a rifle that you enjoy looking at and that fits you well (or have it modified to fit you well). Then you simply must shoot the rifle extensively. If you fire it enough you値l know it works (building confidence) and you値l know how to work it (building ability) and those two factors matter a lot more than who made it.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I have or have had good rifles by many makers and some zeroes by the very same makers. All of the makers turn out good and bad rifles and all of them have some feature they claim makes it "better" or "value added". Best advice is to try as many as you can before buying.

    Getting one you like and shoot a lot matters much more and if you're like most of us the budget will have something to say about it too.

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    Member akaviator's Avatar
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    I've got an old style Ruger M77 .338WM with a 2x7 Leupold and absolutely love it, my high power rifle ever. That old Ruger receiver is STOUT.

    Of course living in Georgia, it's only good for shooting bad guy's Buicks.

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    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    I carry Push Feed and Controlled Round Feed rifles through the Alaska wilderness and never have a concern about their readiness to perform. The reason for this is that I am very familiar with every rifle I carry. I shoot as much as possible on my budget and practice dry firing when the money runs out. Any quality rifle should feed and function properly and if they do not it痴 more than likely not a design flaw, but an issue with an individual rifle which can be remedied if you know there is a problem. I've three Rem 700s that are smooth as glass, reliable as a claw hammer and deadly in the field. They will feed upside down, tilted right, left or at any other angle I can imagine and they have never failed me in the field. I've zero reservations about their use or performance regardless the game I知 after or might bump into while afield. They are just like a trio of PF Ruger M77s, or a PF Sako L61, or a PF Tikka, or a Pf Weatherby Mark V. All perform without a hitch and I would use any of them that are chambered in a cartridge suitable for dangerous game without any hesitation. The only way to know this is to shoot the rifle a lot. 20 rounds from the bench sighting it in is not a lot, though many guys think it痴 enough. One hundred rounds is not a lot, but few rifles get shot this much in ten years. If you really want confidence in your rifle you need to shoot it enough to know that it will perform properly and the only way to know this is to use the rifle enough to prove it, regardless of its design or maker.

    Buy a rifle that you enjoy looking at and that fits you well (or have it modified to fit you well). Then you simply must shoot the rifle extensively. If you fire it enough you値l know it works (building confidence) and you値l know how to work it (building ability) and those two factors matter a lot more than who made it.


    This is about as best it has been said in as long as I can remember! Thank you and well done.

    BTW, I have a Rem 700 Stainless, and a Sako AV both in 375 H&H, and love them both. But, I recently sold a Rem 700 in 300 WM that I did'nt like the way it fed (rough) and bought a used 300 WM Ruger 77 MII that is like butter.

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    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    I carry Push Feed and Controlled Round Feed rifles through the Alaska wilderness and never have a concern about their readiness to perform....

    Buy a rifle that you enjoy looking at and that fits you well (or have it modified to fit you well). Then you simply must shoot the rifle extensively. If you fire it enough you値l know it works (building confidence) and you値l know how to work it (building ability) and those two factors matter a lot more than who made it.
    I "must spread the love" before giving you rep, so here's public acknowledgment that if I could, I would. Well said, and spot on!

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    I thank all of you for the info. There are so many brands out there, these days and checking what is field proven. The dream of the Alaskan hunt.

  13. #13

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    I really like my Ruger M77 rifles
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  14. #14

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    Welcome to the forum NorthernKid. You have already gotten a wealth of great input and advice. Especially about getting a rifle that fits you well and that you can shoot well with. Something that YOU will have CONFIDENCE in. Confidence counts for more than all the bling out there in rifle looney land.

    For 338 Win and 375 H&H usually means some or all the time you are going to be after big mean critters, some may even bite back. That said, controlled round feed is a confidence builder more me. Now I would feel almost as good with a Sako, even though it is a push feed.

    Also don't hesitate buying used. I've yet to see a shot out or wore out 338 or 375. 98% of all you will find are carried a lot and shot very little. Some not even carried a lot! Take your savings and put towards a stout low power variable or fixed power scope. A Leupold VXIII 2.5-8 is a good benchmark.

    Good luck, as they say, getting there is half the fun. Holding them, fondling them, caressing them, searching for that perfect one, rifle that is...!!!

  15. #15
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    Take a look at one of the control round feed Sako 85 Kodiak 375 H&H and you'll fall in love. Actually, it comes in 338wm as well.

    In 338wm, between my good hunting buddies and I we have a Sako 75 Hunter, Browning A-Bolt, Ruger M77, Remington 700 XCR, and Winchester M70. All the rifles shoot well and are loved by their owners. So, who's shooting the right brand? Answer, we all are. As said earlier, find one that looks good, feels good, and shoots good and no matter what the brand you'll have yourself a winner.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozarks View Post
    Also don't hesitate buying used. I've yet to see a shot out or wore out 338 or 375. 98% of all you will find are carried a lot and shot very little.
    My last .375 H&H looked like it was drug behind a garbage truck across town. I was probably owner number 6 or 7. Apparently pervious owners weren't much for rifle care and at least one lived near salt water.

    It sure didn't look like much but my gunsmith commented looking at it one day that he didn't think it had many rounds down the bore at all despite its rough appearance. It shot great but I ultimately went off in pursuit of a lighter weight rifle.

    Once you get into those calibers the definition of "recreational shooting" changes a bit...

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    Winchester Classic would be my first choice, and Ruger second.

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    I picked up a used but like new Remington 700 XCR in 375 Wednesday. It only had the iron sights on it but I just had to fire it. Yesterday I put 10 rounds through it and it shot beautifully at 50 yards. Now to scope it and see what it will do further out. Recoil was not as bad as expected.

    My only question with the gun is this. I am not sure about the factory stock. I never had one like this stock and it may have to be replaced. But that will come later, if it really is necessary. There is always the chance I will like it once I get accustomed to the new feel.

  19. #19
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    I really like my Ruger M77 rifles
    me too.........
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  20. #20
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    Wink .338 and .375 Rifles

    Highly recommend the Ruger M 77 Hawkeye w/ composite stock and stainless steel action and barrel. I'v hunted all over the workd with mine...it has been an exceptional performer.

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