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Thread: Great scope for a Kimber Montana, opinions, logic and favorites welcome!

  1. #1

    Default Great scope for a Kimber Montana, opinions, logic and favorites welcome!

    Hi all,

    Hey I'm looking for opinions and some thought on rifles scopes. I'm looking for a scope. To put on a Kimber Montana 325 wsm and am torn. Do I go with a variable or do I go with a fixed power, do I bite the bullet and go with the highly over priced euro optics or stay domestic? I was raised ans suffer from 6X scope habit and always with a target dot reticle seems I am able to shoot a dot better than a plex reticle style reticle. What do you all prefer, recommend, and or use? Money is not an issue so fire away!!

    Thanks a million

  2. #2
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    Default Kimber MT and VXIII 2.5-8x36....made for each other

    I went around this mountain a few years ago when I bought my 325. I ended up taking my rifle in, laying it on the counter and laying scopes next to it after viewing through them. I liked the Zeiss but the optical end (nearest eye) was just too big and bulky. I felt the 40mm scopes were a little too big as well. I bought the Kimber cuz of the nice light compact package and wanted a scope to "fit". The Leupold VX III 2.5-8x36 fit the bill. Compact, light, been around forever, excellent optics, long eye releif. I could'nt find anything I didn't like about it and still haven't. I've had it on several looong walkin sheep hunts, shot game from 165 to 400 yards with it. 2.5 gathers lots of light and 8x it plenty of magnification. I'd rather have the 2.5 on the low end than 10x on the high end. With Talley LW ring/bases it's a perfect fit.

    My .02



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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    It really depends on what you see yourself using it for animals? places?

    I have the same rifle and it wears a Leupold 2-7 Euro. That or the 2.5-8 are about perfect in my oppinion. Fixed powers made a lot of sense back when they were still working all the kinks out of variables, but quite frankly I see no real reason not to go with a variable aside from personal preference. Variables are rugged, they work, and they're FAR more versitile. As for weather to go European I think it really depends on budget, but more than anything intended use.

    Brett

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    scopes are very subjective......much like boots....we each have our own reasons or fitting....

    My Montana 30WSM wears a Leupold 1.75X-6X......with a custom post reticle.....I dislike large lens scopes as I find them to be easily bumped and usually unnecessary....It's the only variable scope I have and it has worked out well.....my go to rifle......but may not be the perfect scope for you.

  5. #5
    Member Timber Smith's Avatar
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    Default Can't go wrong with a Leopold VXIII

    I owned this model rifle and ran three different scopes on it, all Leopold VXIIIs: 1.5-5, 1.75-6, and a 2.5-8 depending on the use. I have to agree with Perry that the 2.5-8x36mm seemed to me to be the best fit on this rifle for most all general applications. It really depends on your intended use. I usually prefer just a duplex reticle in these variable scopes but did have a German no.4 on a 1.5-5 for close in work. Whatever you do stay away from any kind of illuminated reticles as IMHO they are unnecessary in a lightweight hunting rifle. If money is no object, you might even want to take a look at the Leopold VX 7s as well as the Europeans. With any of these high end optics you can surely pay more, but, you really reach a point of diminishing returns and some actual drawbacks compared to the VXIIIs: heavier weight, smaller eyebox, and less eye relief. That being said I am actually looking at scoping a Kimber Montana 338WM probably with a Euro scope now looking at a S&B Summit. I wanted a new Leica just because I want to try one and contacted Doug at Cameraland today to purchase one but, he informed me that they are not yet available and no delivery planned. Zeiss and Swaro could also be an option. When you reach this level of optics I don't believe you can make a bad choice, you just have to consider what is best for you as with optics it really is in the eye of the beholder. TS


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    Default options...

    just find one that works for you, and is comfortable.

    My Montana .325 wsm wears the VX-III, 3.5 x 10, Leupold. That is the largest magnification I would consider, but then again it all depends on what you're mostly targeting and preference. Lightweight Talleys for mounts work well.

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    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    Well from your post it sounds like your not interested in "the highly over priced Euro optics". So how do you get Euro quality glass for under a thousand dollars and still support the American worker?

    Easy answer, Zeiss Conquest. Assembled in the U.S. with glass and components shipped over from Germany. $400-$600 price tag depending on reticle and magnification. Etched glass reticle, constant eye relief, lifetime warranty.......

    Leupold VX3 is a great scope and is a couple ounces lighter than the Conquest. Though that's about the only category it tops Zeiss.

    If you want something in the $250-$500 range look at a Sightron II or Sightron II Big Sky. Better optics than Leupold, along with better warranty and erector system. They just aren't as well known which scares people away. I put a 3-9x40 SII on a 7mm last winter and am very happy. The two caribou I dropped with it this year probably aren't though.

    Pick any of the three companies above and you'll be happy.

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    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    Dear Santa,

    All I want for Christmas is a Swarovski 1.7-10x42 Z6 30mm riflescope.

  9. #9
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wonderer View Post
    Dear Santa,

    All I want for Christmas is a Swarovski 1.7-10x42 Z6 30mm riflescope.
    If he's making the trip anyways I'll take a 1.5-6!!!

    Brett

  10. #10

    Default Euro trash

    My 300 WSM Montana wears a 3-9x36 Swarovski. One inch tube, lightweight and oh so sexy!

  11. #11

    Default

    I got a smoking deal on a little 3-9 33mm leupold compact. I like that it is small. Honestly even a 40 mm scope might look a little big on a compact gun like that. I know it does on my wife's model 7. So I chose the 33mm. Its lightweight too and I can't tell a difference in low light between it an my VX-II 3-9 40mm on my .338 WM.

  12. #12

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    Thanks to you all and Snyd for the photo. I worked at Sportsman's Warehouse for 5 years and am currently part time so i spend a lot of time mulling over scopes at the gun counter.....i am falling into the bigger is better like everyone else because i see the egos every day. whom buy rifles with no real practical purpose, for example like carrying an Remington Sendaro in a 300 Ultra mag with a 5.5-22x56 with tatical mounts to hunt sheep or goats!!! i know Nightforce makes killer scopes but they all weigh a ton and are gargantuan.

    I have no real aversion to Euro optics in any way. i think the swarovski 1" scopes are very sexy and that little pewter falcon, eagle, hawk thingy on the scope turret caps is well...........whats not to like. I would love to drool over a S&B Summit 2.5-10X40 but with a #3 target dot that they say they offer. I hear its a spendy little Number, though i have not found any yet.

    After looking at the Leupold 2.5-8X36, Im impressed. And I can get a dot put in it from the factory.

    Zeiss conquest would awesome though I am really set on the target dot. to me the dot makes me feel like im looking at the butt end of the bullet in flight when shooting, so when I put fuzz behing it and squeeze things just fall over dead.

    These are the ones ill look at.....thanks again all. and thanks Snyd i like those talley One piece rings they are sharp...the pics helped a ton. the scope looks bigger than i pictured in my mind. when on the gun.

  13. #13
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    The only problem with a dot reticle is what if the animal is dark, in the shaddows, or it's last light. The reticle may be difficult to see. Having verticle and horizontal bars makes a big difference every once in while. Not always, but every once in a while. Just a thought.

    Brett

  14. #14
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wonderer View Post
    Dear Santa,

    All I want for Christmas is a Swarovski 1.7-10x42 Z6 30mm riflescope.

    The bad thing is Santa always seems to tag my checkbook for the stuff he leaves!

  15. #15

    Default

    Went down this path myself with the 308 version and got the Leupold 2.5x8 VXIII.

    The scope just fits the gun. A lightweight gun like that will have its balance and ergonomics seriously affected by a big scope. The low mounted 2.5 x 8 makes the cheek weld just right for scope height and the gun doesn't feel top heavy. Gun is just over 6 lb with scope.

  16. #16

    Default

    I'll throw the rijicon name into the mix too. They are the best scopes made in the US, in my opinion. I have Leupolds and have used many others including Swaro's, and Ziess, but I'd pick the Trijicon again. Clear, tough and made in America... what is better than that?


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    Default

    If you're serious about a tough, lightweight scope for hunting, that pretty much rules out a variable (in my opinion - others may disagree).

    Also, if you are not carrying a rangefinder, it's in your interest to get acquainted with the various standard duplex reticles, as they are an excellent tool for judging range. For example, I know from reading the leupold catalog and looking though the scope at the range that the fat ends of the duplex reticle on my leupold fixed 6x spread 9" at 100 yards. Your average deer/sheep body is 18" deep or so. If your sheep body fits between the fat vertical ends of the duplex, but just barely, he's ~200 yards away. If the sheep body fits between one fat end of the vertical hair and the horizontal hair, he's ~400 yards away.

    Also, unless you are attempting to thread a bullet through a hole in the rocks at 200+ yards, you don't need any magnification higher than 4x for any mountain game if shooting any reasonable hunting rifle. Your needs may change if and when you shoot enough to start lobbing VLDs at game out of a match barrel from 600+ yards. I'll never be there.

  18. #18
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    +1 to Vek with this one.

    I'm a real fan on fixed powers on my hunting rifles and my lightweight 300WSM carries a Leupold 4x. The fixed powers are not for everyone but I like the simplicity they afford. I wish more manufacturers made high quality fixed powers.

  19. #19

    Default Euro scopes

    seams like folks are quick to bash the Euro scopes. I understand about American pride and keeping the home folks working but....I must respectfully disagree about the quality of the Schmidt & Bender product as compared to anything I've seen manufactured in the USA. Granted I haven't seen every scope on the market and do not purport to know everything about the optics industry but those American made scopes that I have seen just have not measured up to the S&B product. I am certainly not made of money and frankly I can not afford their new retail product either. However I've found some excellent bargains on the used market from the S&B product line.

    I bought a used, appeared new Schmidt and Bender 1.5 to 6 by 42 variable scope for $900. (It's now mounted to my 358 Norma Mag bolt gun) I can not tell the difference between the used and a new product. The scope is the absolute finest optics I have ever had the pleasure of looking through. Personally after this experience I would rather buy a cheaper rifle and spend more on the scope, but always buy the highest quality scope I can find on the used market.

    I'm just saying there is another compromise option out there without having to mortgage the house to find good quality optics or by settling for something less than the best. It's about doing research, staying away from the "Big Box" stores, about not paying retail and adding near 10% tax on top of that price. If a guy is willing to look hard enough, do his homework, and set his mind on "Hunting" for that trophy scope they are out there on the used market for a fraction of the cost of new. For me at least, I found a way to step up to the Euro market without paying the Euro prices by going used. And I don't feel like I've compromised anything by buying used.

    Consider this: For all you guys that bought new scopes and took them out of the box, all those scopes are now considered "used".

    I am indebted for the time I spend lurking about the Alaska Outdoors forum learning about equipment, technique and benefiting from other men's experiences. This forum has taught me immensely. The one thing I'd like to sort of "give-back" to the forum is my learned experience of seeking out the best quality items (in this case optics) on the used market. I'm not trying to be controversial or stir the pot, but my experience has been that the Schmidt and Bender product, that I could not afford new, is readily obtainable on the used market and I believe to have found the world's best scope, at least for my hunting purposes.

    Your results may vary....
    Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for the shadow is mine and so is the valley. Thy Glock and thy M14 comfort me in days of civil unrest and terror

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