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Thread: Weaver Scope

  1. #1

    Default Weaver Scope

    I have a old Weaver steel tube marksman 4X scope. It has got very dull to look through, and will not gather light for low light shooting. It has been in the family for years and I do not want to get rid of it, but would like to have it in usable condition. Can anybody give me some options or ideas?

  2. #2

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    Here is a link to an outfit that is doing non warranty repair work on scopes. The work on almost anything, but advertise working on Weaver and Redfields. I hope this helps.
    http://www.ironsightinc.com/

  3. #3
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Default

    Here is another link for general scope repair. The website suggests it is for Redfield, but they provide service on other manufacturers' scopes as well.

    http://www.abousainc.com/sub1.htm

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    Default Thanks!

    Thanks for the links guys - the prices from these people are a lot more reasonable than what I've found in the past. I've got several European scopes including a K.Kahles, B. Nickols, and a Pecar that need lens seperation repaired. Apparently Alaska is hard on scopes - I suspect taking them in and out of cold weather plus the dry climate play havoc on the old resin cemented objective lens.

    The Weavers are actually easy to diassemble and repair yourself if you are handy fixing things. You can get them reblued once they are disassemblied. I've repaired a number of them myself even replacing the crosshairs. The nitrogen sealing is a joke so you can't mess that up. You just have to be carefull of the crosshairs and adjust the turrent to correct the parralex. No matter what you do they are still pretty dull compared to any modern scope.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  5. #5

    Default Your last line says it all,

    When it comes to scopes a new quality scope is always a good way to go. I don't know what you mean about nitrogen filling being a joke. Creating a vacuum in a scope and replacing the air in the tube with nitrogen is done for a reason, to keep the internal environment in the scope from causing problems. I have 2 old Weavers that I used for years. I just keep them in the closet with my other "stuff." Why take a chance on ruining a hunt with an old, potentially unreliable glass? A new Weaver, not made in Texas, is a terrific scope, especially for the cost.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    When it comes to scopes a new quality scope is always a good way to go. I don't know what you mean about nitrogen filling being a joke. Creating a vacuum in a scope and replacing the air in the tube with nitrogen is done for a reason, to keep the internal environment in the scope from causing problems. I have 2 old Weavers that I used for years. I just keep them in the closet with my other "stuff." Why take a chance on ruining a hunt with an old, potentially unreliable glass? A new Weaver, not made in Texas, is a terrific scope, especially for the cost.
    In my non-expert opinion, I agree with that.

    I have a couple of the New Weaver K4s and they are great. Much brighter, and sharper than my Old Weaver K2.5.

    The mounting surface on them isn't very long, and they don't work easily for a rifle that has a long distance betwixt the bases. Of course this is something one should always consider. Will it fit your gun??

    Will the eye piece be close enough to your eye without having to lean in a lot??

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  7. #7
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    Default Nitrogen filling

    Sorry for not being more clear. What I meant to convey is that the nitrogen filling in the old Weavers is a joke because they aren't sealed very well if at all and any benefits you may gain from nitrogen filling disappears very quickly. Remember too that many of the old rings were one piece and required you to remove the eyepiece to even get them mounted.

    I'm not sure about new scopes using a vaccum but in repairing old ones the nitrogen is used to simply purge the scope of air and then sealed. Idea of course is to get all the moisture out as the nitrogen is water vapor free and won't cause condensate or react with components in the scope i.e rust or corrosion. You could get about the same effect by purging the scope with ambient air at -60 F or colder as the air at that temperature is also very dry.

    Weaver introduced many of us to scopes on rifles either on our .22 RFs or the K series on our first high powered rifles. I had my orginal 03-A3 '06 still with my first K4 down at the range a while back along with several rifles with more modern optics. It didn't take long to remind me just how poor the old Weaver is compared to a Leupold or Nikon. Never the less I used to consistantly put my first 3 shots in a 1/2" C-C group for when the gun and I were much newer. Now that I finally have some more Remington primers I'll try it again with a better scope.


    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    When it comes to scopes a new quality scope is always a good way to go. I don't know what you mean about nitrogen filling being a joke. Creating a vacuum in a scope and replacing the air in the tube with nitrogen is done for a reason, to keep the internal environment in the scope from causing problems. I have 2 old Weavers that I used for years. I just keep them in the closet with my other "stuff." Why take a chance on ruining a hunt with an old, potentially unreliable glass? A new Weaver, not made in Texas, is a terrific scope, especially for the cost.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  8. #8
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    Default

    The old scopes didn't have the lens coatings we have today and didn't let light through nearly as well. I have a WWII Zeiss scope and although still clear it just doesn't let light through like a new cheap scope with fully multicoated lenses. So, unless replacing the lenses, you can't get clarity like todays scopes.

  9. #9
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Default

    Another option for Weaver repair is Bill Ackerman, Optical Services Company. Not sure if you have checked with him yet, but he is the man for old Weavers.

  10. #10
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    http://www.ironsightinc.com/ check this out it may help

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