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Thread: Pine T&G

  1. #1
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Pine T&G

    Looking for opinions, experiences and suggestions on use of Pine T&G for cabin walls, I plan to place OSB under it but should I stain or just you a clear coat. Initially I like the idea of just a clear coat but a lighter stain might be nice, I have no idea of what kind or particular colors which might take well so you if have any suggestions I'd appreciate them. Here is a good clear coat example posted yesterday by another contributor to the site, his looks nice: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...1&d=1259558346

    Also beside Home Depot and Lowes and recommendations on where to but some?

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Pine T&G looks great in cabins; this is a universal truth. Unfortunately, pine is one of the most difficult woods to stain; I've seen some beautiful pine work that people tried to stain dark colors, and it's hideous. This is just a fact of life with fast-growing softwoods: they stain blotchy. I personally think pine looks great with just a clear coat. Water-based products seem to amber less over time; varnished pine that goes up golden can turn a garish orange over the years. I've had good luck with Minwax Polycrilic, probably the easiest water-based finish to find. What I would recommend is to go to the nearest Sherwin-Williams and pick their brains; those guys are way more knowledgable than your typical big box crew, and their products are superior. Another thing I always do is orient the grooves facing down; in case water gets in, it won't pool up in them. And blind-nail into studs. That's all I know.

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    You could always e-mail Norm from The Yankee Workshop on the PBS sight.

    He works with a lot of pine. Just a thought.

  4. #4
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Get quotes from all the local mills. Mat-Valley Milling, Popperts etc....

    I used Minnwax Clear Satin in my sun room a couple years ago. Still looks good with no yellowing.

    Do you really need to put it over OSB?

  5. #5
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Here is what I found ref Pine staining from the New Yankee Workshop:
    Question:
    I just finshed Rockin Horse made out of Yellow Pine. Just wondering what finsh would work the best to get a old antique look to. Was thinking about using Minwax Polyshade Honey Pine.Thanks for your help.Ron Martin


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    Answer:
    That will work. We did our rocking horse in ash and finished it with honey pine. and several clear coats of poly.


    Question:
    How do you seal pine to accept a lighter color of stain? If I use shellac cut with alcohol it wets the wood and makes it darker. I have tried Minwax pre-conditioner and it also wets or darkens the wood and does not dry back to normal color. I would like to leave the pine color the same but putting stain on raw pine leaves it a VERY uneven color. If you have any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for all the great shows and lessons.Dennis

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    Answer:
    You might try to use a sanding sealer and then a water based poly urethane. The water based products do not darken with age as do conventional solvent-based polys.


    Question:
    Dear Norm,I am a big fan of yours and need your help. I have made a pair of huge bookcases for a friend out of "Ponderosa Pine" and they look great unfinished. I have applied a coat of Minwax's wood conditioner according to instructions and started the first coat of Minwax Wood Finish and I am seeing a very blotchy, uneven color develop. I am sure that I am following instructions properly, what is happening? I will just be sick if I don't have great looking pieces to turn over to my friend! Help, please hurry! Thank you, Mike Tuggle


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    Answer:
    Pine is one of the most difficult woods to stain well avoiding blotchness. We haven't had any practice using the wood conditioner. We suggest you contact Minwax directly at their website for answers to your questions. And let us know what they have to say.Good luck

    Question:
    You often mention a finish for your pine projects, I believe it is polyurethane with a stain. I remember one episode where you used it on an Irish table. Who makes the product and what is the color of the stain?


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    Answer:
    Minwax Honey Pine is the stain polyurethane that we use.

  6. #6
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Default

    If you really want to pursue staining your pine, go to woodweb.com and check out the knowledge base there. It's probably the most comprehensive woodworking site out there, and they're all pros. I'd shy away from Polyshades if I were you; it's a great concept but a very difficult product to work with. I've had success straining it and spraying on many very light coats, but I had to in order to match existing work. I wouldn't use it again. It runs like crazy, even on stuff flat on a bench. Trying to put it on walls or ceilings would be a nightmare.

  7. #7
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    All of the pine tng I have installed has had water based poly and that's it. After a few years it all ages to a nice amber hue. I wouldn't dream of trying to stain it.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    I just finished using 4 gallons of water based poly. I bought a few different brand in quarts. I thought Cabot was the easiest to use. Wasn't on pine though, it was VG Larch.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

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    Water based finishes raise the grain and make the surface rough. Sanding between coats will smooth it down but...that's work and multiple coats.

  10. #10

    Default White Wash

    We white washed ours, then applied polyurethane. We like the looks of it and have had nothing but compliments and questions about it. No blotchiness or grain raising. It's not showing yellowing yet either.

    Although it's a bad picture, you can see the white washing doesn't take the character out of the wood like most people think it will.
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