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Thread: Geanges Freighters?

  1. #1

    Default Geanges Freighters?

    Has anyone seen these canoes? Alternative to Scott Canoe, and they claim to run very shallow water with a short shaft: http://www.geanges.ca/U_Jimmy.htm

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by canuckjgc View Post
    Has anyone seen these canoes? Alternative to Scott Canoe, and they claim to run very shallow water with a short shaft: http://www.geanges.ca/U_Jimmy.htm
    Check out the videos that go with the link. He's beating up a fast shoal about 7 or so mph. Looks like he could use some weight in the front. Cool video.

  3. #3
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    Default Canoe's

    they look good don't know what it would cost to fright them to Alaska the big one realy looks great for the big rivers in Alaska, the man in the videos was going a little fast up that rip for me, but it did look great, if he hit a rock the gearbox might be toast, wonder what the big one goes for ?? [money]

    SID

  4. #4

    Default BIG

    The bigger one (WHITE WULF) looks interesting. At 24' 9" it might haul a lot of weight, but you wouldn't portage it as heavy as it is !

    http://www.geanges.ca/w_wulf.htm
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    looks interesting ,any idea of what keel type it has?It is a fair bit narrower than the hudsonbay though.The HB is 56" and this one is 47".

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    Quote Originally Posted by grit View Post
    looks interesting ,any idea of what keel type it has?It is a fair bit narrower than the hudsonbay though.The HB is 56" and this one is 47".
    Yeah, they are narrow. They are basically a Gander River boat, designed for the fast freestone salmon rivers of Newfoundland. Good boats, but maybe a little narrower than need be for Alaska rivers.

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    Default canoe

    if it is narrorw it will comsume less gas when moving on the water compaired to a wider canoe so it is not all bad

    SID

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    Question what is the advantage to the small width transom?

    Their big one is 6 feet longer than my Scott Albany, but mine has a transom close to twice as wide as theirs. Why do they make their transom so narrow? Doesn't seem like you'd push any less water... would you?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Their big one is 6 feet longer than my Scott Albany, but mine has a transom close to twice as wide as theirs. Why do they make their transom so narrow? Doesn't seem like you'd push any less water... would you?
    In a displacement hull it's not only how much water you push, but how easily you put the water back. You are going through the water, not planing on top of it. This canoe is similar to a wine stem transom where the canoe comes to a point on the water line. Mine does the same thing. This allows you to burn less fuel because the hull is more efficient.
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    It's still wider than a Grumman freighter and longer. The video of the White Wolf is telling. I'd trade in my Grumman in a heartbeat for one.
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