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Thread: Afognak or Peninsula for trophy brown bear

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    Member Bucksandnoles's Avatar
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    Default Afognak or Peninsula for trophy brown bear

    I'm looking for "a show of hands" whether you would prefer to hunt Afognak or the peninsula for a trophy 9'+ brown bear. I hunted the peninsula this fall, and had a great hunt, but passed on a couple 7-8' bears. I'd like to come back up and am considering a spring Afognak hunt, should I get drawn, or a fall hunt in 2011 on the peninsula.

  2. #2

    Wink

    Hands down, the Alaska Penn will produce more big bears every hunt. Way easier terrain to find the bears and get on them.
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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Thumbs up big bears...Alaska Peninsula

    Hunt the Alaska Peninsula....
    Surprised you only saw 7 to 8 foot bears on your fall hunt...

    On my AK Peninsula hunts, both as a guide and as a res-hunter, I generally see 3 to 8 bears a day....
    Hunting Conditions are generally easier, with more open areas. Therefore, less alder brush...generally...
    Plus, on the AK Pen, you do not have to draw a tag...

    dennis

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    Member ramhunter's Avatar
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    Peninsula!....gets my vote

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    hap
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucksandnoles View Post
    I'm looking for "a show of hands" whether you would prefer to hunt Afognak or the peninsula for a trophy 9'+ brown bear. I hunted the peninsula this fall, and had a great hunt, but passed on a couple 7-8' bears. I'd like to come back up and am considering a spring Afognak hunt, should I get drawn, or a fall hunt in 2011 on the peninsula.

    To start, guided non-residents have zero concerns about being drawn on Afognak, or anywhere else in the Kodiak area. There are set aside tags for non-residents and the guides do not oversell them.

    I would go South of Afognak on Kodiak itself. The Native land trespass fee alone on most of Afognak will cost more than the fly-out...

    ADF&G studies show the numbers of bears with green skulls over 29" increasing over the past 20+ years and distributed very evenly across the entire unit. All the stories about the Ailulik and such do not hold water when the variables are looked at carefully.

    Every unit has big bears available. It is really good to see realistic expectations and understanding of how big the big bears really are...

    And if size is all that matters I would go as late as possible in the spring. Big bears are extremely nocturnal and skittish... Get them when they are distracted by sows...
    art

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    I would not hunt Afognak due to the trespass fees for Bears being over $1000.00.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Member B&C 04's Avatar
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    Kodiak is where I would end up..

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucksandnoles View Post
    I'm looking for "a show of hands" whether you would prefer to hunt Afognak or the peninsula for a trophy 9'+ brown bear. I hunted the peninsula this fall, and had a great hunt, but passed on a couple 7-8' bears. I'd like to come back up and am considering a spring Afognak hunt, should I get drawn, or a fall hunt in 2011 on the peninsula.
    Between GMUs 9d or 9e and GMU 8 chances for 9 foot plus bear on a guided hunt has a lot more to do with the guide than the area. For the non-guided hunter has a lot more to do with what they know about hunting and judging than where they are hunting.
    For a prospective guided hunt the guide should be able to say what the average skull total has been for males and females. If they don't have at least 12 for males the average may not mean much. Look at what they are producing in all the areas they hunt. If they have less than about 15 males find someone with more experience.
    The bear sealing data base is available to the general public.
    Good Luck
    If I can be of help from a data standpoint, please let me know.
    Joe (Ak)

  9. #9

    Default I don't know.

    I've never hunted the AK Pen, but I hope to this spring (spring even, fall odd - right?), unless I draw Kodiak again. My last two trips to Kodiak, we saw lots of good bears. Took one 10-6" off Afognak on the public land side, and we took an 8-6" sow with a huge skull and passed several 9'+ and one 10' during the trip. The ten footer was really nice, but since I already had a ten footer, I was hoping my brother would get the shot and he didn't see it in the brush at about 50 yards. The nine footers were rubbed and so we passed.

    Either way, it sounds like a good time to me.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Hunt the Alaska Peninsula....
    Surprised you only saw 7 to 8 foot bears on your fall hunt...

    On my AK Peninsula hunts, both as a guide and as a res-hunter, I generally see 3 to 8 bears a day....
    Hunting Conditions are generally easier, with more open areas. Therefore, less alder brush...generally...
    Plus, on the AK Pen, you do not have to draw a tag...

    dennis
    A nice numer of bears! What are you averaging for skull size on those males?
    How many?
    Thanks
    Joe (Ak)

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    if i was gonna do the peninsula i'd go at least half way down, father from king salmon you get the better the bears will be. cinder river down seems to produce better bears than the north half. that beings aid the east side seems to do better than the west side on the top half of the peninsula.
    BUT if i wanted a big bear, i'd be on kodiak for sure. i've seen more big bears on individual hunts on kodiak that i ever had on the peninsula. i don't like afognak, least the part i was on was to brushy and full of trees...
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  12. #12
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Peninsula Bears...

    WantJ,

    My two best brown bear kills on the Alaska Peninsula were...

    I took my son down to Izembek in the spring of 1998 (?) and we got him a 9'10" boar with a 26+ inch skull, after passing on three other fine boars. He (the son, not the bear) was just here visiting Alaska for the Thankgiving holiday and we had a great time reliving that hunt.

    In 2000 (?) I worked as an assistant north of Cold Bay. After seeing at least 25 bears, and passing on 4 or 5 good boars, we got a monster. I spotted him on the second day, and on the forth day of the season my client-hunter shot an honest 10' 6" record book brown bear! The official B&C score was 28 1/8, just "making the book", and is clearly the biggest bear kill I have been in on. What a great area. I wish I could hunt there more often. Frankly, the AK Pen is the only place I have been bear hunting where I could pass on mature boars, knowing that there would probably be additional opportunities as the season progressed.

    I have also been in on six additional brown bear kills on the AK Pen while on either personal hunts with friends or professional hunts. All were average bears with, well, smaller skulls. I did not keep a record of these bears. Therefore, I really can not guess what an avarage skull size was for this relitively small sample.

    This coming May I have scheduled another personal hunt, again in Izembek. I hope to do well. Wish me luck! I'll let you know how I do...

    Great memories...thanks for asking.

    Dennis

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    ATA, BRNBR, want...

    on the average. how MUCH time is spent on one brown bear hunt?

    that include the time YOU spent prior to the client showing up...

    thanks

    ( jake you've been absent i am planning one)
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Well I would rather hunt off kodiak, I use to work out at Raspberry island remote camps and saw many large bears on both raspberry and afognak islands, the only problem with them are how thick they can be, I guess its a toss up either way as going on a hunt and seeing a "trophy" bear isint ever guaranteed...good luck though!

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    vince, when i do a brown bear hunt i don't go into the field until the client is with me, so i spent the same amount of time as the client does. i fly in with them and out with them.
    I've seen to many hunters/hunts where guys show up early to scout or "secure" a spot, give a good bear three days of knowing your in a valley and he'll usually get a little weird and change whatever pattern he might have had. On kodiak when i do a bear hunt i show up the night before season opens that way opening morning i've got the drop on them. makes a difference.
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    ATA, BRNBR, want...

    on the average. how MUCH time is spent on one brown bear hunt?

    that include the time YOU spent prior to the client showing up...

    thanks

    ( jake you've been absent i am planning one)
    Vince
    We always plan the hunt for the duration of the permit (14 or 15 days). On the first hunt would try to go in the day before the permit began and allow an extra day on the "tail end" to get back to the access point. If the last day we could hunt was on the 15th, pickup would be scheduled for the 17th.
    Not a "fan" of scouting the area before the client shows up. Information gathering is an ongoing process, and at least in my opinion best done with the client right there with you.
    Regarding the amount of time with client. As of several years ago average skull totals produced by individual guides in GMU 8 were ranging from a low of 24 something to a high of just over 27 inches for male brown bears. There was a very strong relationship between the average skull total and average number of days hunted, with the high being an average of 9 point something days and the low being less than four day.
    "Squeeze" in every minute you can!!
    Good Luck
    Please let me know if I can help.
    Joe (Ak)

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Time in field

    Vince,

    Generally speaking, I arrange for two back-to-back 10 day float hunts in western Alaska.
    I generally fly into the bush with the first hunter(s), and have a "change-out day/shuttle-day" in the middle. Following the second hunt, I fly out to Dillingham with the last hunter(s).

    Hunters are in the field for 10 hunt-days, with a travel (flying) day before and after the hunt. Each hunter is in the bush for 12 days. Generally, I am out in the bush for a total of 23 days on those brown bear float hunts. That is the basic "desired" schedule.

    The brown bear season in western Alaska was recently extended by moving the opening day forward from Sept 10th, to Sept 1st. Therefore, I'm coordinating with my first hunter for Sep 2010 and we will probably extend that hunt for a few additional days. As a very small guide-outfitter dealing with a small but dedicated cadre of hunters, I often "taylor a hunt" to meet a client-hunters specific needs/desires.

    In addition, I have no idea how the curreny DNR Guide Concession Area effort will affect me in 2011 and beyond........

    Vince...Waz Up? Whats the survey for?

    Dennis

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    "...All the stories about the Ailulik and such do not hold water when the variables are looked at carefully..."
    art
    And what might those "variables" be? Just curious.
    Joe (Ak)

  19. #19
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    vince, when i do a brown bear hunt i don't go into the field until the client is with me, so i spent the same amount of time as the client does. i fly in with them and out with them.
    I've seen to many hunters/hunts where guys show up early to scout or "secure" a spot, give a good bear three days of knowing your in a valley and he'll usually get a little weird and change whatever pattern he might have had. On kodiak when i do a bear hunt i show up the night before season opens that way opening morning i've got the drop on them. makes a difference.
    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Vince
    We always plan the hunt for the duration of the permit (14 or 15 days). On the first hunt would try to go in the day before the permit began and allow an extra day on the "tail end" to get back to the access point. If the last day we could hunt was on the 15th, pickup would be scheduled for the 17th.
    Not a "fan" of scouting the area before the client shows up. Information gathering is an ongoing process, and at least in my opinion best done with the client right there with you.
    Regarding the amount of time with client. As of several years ago average skull totals produced by individual guides in GMU 8 were ranging from a low of 24 something to a high of just over 27 inches for male brown bears. There was a very strong relationship between the average skull total and average number of days hunted, with the high being an average of 9 point something days and the low being less than four day.
    "Squeeze" in every minute you can!!
    Good Luck
    Please let me know if I can help.
    Joe (Ak)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Vince,

    Generally speaking, I arrange for two back-to-back 10 day float hunts in western Alaska.
    I generally fly into the bush with the first hunter(s), and have a "change-out day/shuttle-day" in the middle. Following the second hunt, I fly out to Dillingham with the last hunter(s).

    Hunters are in the field for 10 hunt-days, with a travel (flying) day before and after the hunt. Each hunter is in the bush for 12 days. Generally, I am out in the bush for a total of 23 days on those brown bear float hunts.

    The brown bear season in western Alaska was recently extended by moving the opening day forward from Sept 10th, to Sept 1st. Therefore, I'm coordinating with my first hunter for Sep 2010 and we will probably extend that hunt for a few additional days. As a very small guide-outfitter dealing with a small but dedicated cadre of hunters, I often "taylor a hunt" to meet a client-hunters specific needs/desires.

    In addition, I have no idea how the curreny DNR Guide Concession Area effort will affect me in 2011 and beyond........

    Vince...Waz Up? Whats the survey for?

    Dennis
    very simple i see to many people NOT dedicate the proper amount of time into a hunt. so by the looks a good brown hunt should be planed a minimum of 10 days? i am planning solo for Elk and Bear on Afognak next fall and am figuring all my time and $$$ now .. so the mind set is right ...


    i will not apply for tags that i can not commit to, if i am drawn.. i don't feel it is fair to other hunters that apply... in the same sense if i am to do the hunt.. i aim to commit the necessary time to make an honest effort.

    thanks for the feed back!!!
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  20. #20
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Hyjacking Continued...

    Vince,

    Time eating factors to consider on a multi animal, multi species, or multi hunter hunt...

    Figure a "pack day" per animal for one, but prob both you and your hunting partner, per animal. Frankly, I never get game within sight of camp.

    Figure 1/2 day gone per cape to process (skinn, flesh, salt).

    Figure 1 complete (or more), or two halves, day expended to process each brown bear pelt.

    (...have spent many rain days under a blue tarp working on capes/pelts...)

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