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Thread: Ice Fishing Stories. Lets Hear Them...

  1. #1

    Default Ice Fishing Stories. Lets Hear Them...

    Lets here your best ice fishing stories. I have two so I will start...

    One year my brother, father, and I were ice fishing near a dock that we usually fish in the summer. We drilled three holes and dropped our jigs down the hole. The action was slow, so slow we left the rods sit near the holes while he stretched our legs. While I am walking around while my favorite ice fishing rod is laying on the ice with the jig in the water. At this time I am roughly 10 feet from the pole. I noticed the tip of my pole was slightly bouncing up and down. It happened in slow motion, all of a sudden the rod swiftly dives down into the 8 inch hole in the ice. As instinct would have it I drove towards the hole to grab the rod. The tips of my fingers barely rubbed the butt of the when the rod was half way down the hole. My favorite ice fishing rod was gone . That next summer I was fishing with a pixee from the dock close to where I lost my ice fishing rod. Not paying attention my pixee fell to the bottom of the lake. As I dragged the spoon across the bottom of the lake I snagged something that resisted the power of my reel. With each turn of the reel it came closer and closer. It was my ice fishing pole!!!! It just so happens I lost it again that summer on otter lake on base. I never retrieved the pole.

    Here’s my second story. This story has received more blank stares and "your a liar" comments than I can remember.

    My father, his friend, and I were thinking of new areas to ice fish. We decided to try a lake we have drove by, quite frequently, in the passed but never thought much of it. Many of you have probably seen this lake and didn’t even take a second look. After drilling a few holes we spent a couple hours wasting our time while playing with our cocktail shrimped jigs. We decided to take a walk around the lake to check for new spots to possibly drill. When we came back to grab our gear we decided to drop one more shrimped jig down the hole. Immediately a small fish grabbed the bait. We stayed in this spot for the rest of the day and catch fish after fish. They were all in the 12-18 inch range. My dad's friend hook a fish that would not come up through the hole. We though this fish was a monster, it would take the drag and run. Once he got the fish close to the hole it would take off again. Finally he got this fish close to the hole and ripped it out of the water. Out of all the fresh water fish that Alaskan lakes hold this was not one of them. It was a flounder.

    Out of all the times I have told this story I have been called a liar, sometimes I relieve a dumfounded look, and many others have said it was not a flounder but a burbot. I know the difference between a burbot and a flounder.

    Ever since this day we keep this area quiet since almost no one knows of its potential. I have told very few people about this lake and it is not easily pried from me. Flounders, in this lake, come every once in awhile, usually once or twice a season. Anyone need pics to prove it?

  2. #2

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    I have seen a lot of flounders and small silvers taken from the Little Lake by the New Glenn Hwy Bridge, the one closest and just to the north of the Knik River Main Channel. It is the place that used to be used by people target practicing. Now all you can do is park there and fish. The silvers are landlocked so they don't get very big. Thousands of them in there though. I think flounders got in there from high tides.

  3. #3
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default Post the pic I'd love to see it. That's cool

    Ok I have a ice fishing story. Actually it's my brothers story but he doesn't post here much so I'll steal it for your pleasure. I'll addd myself in as him to make it easy

    We were on a small lake up north spearing and we found a nice spot that seemed to have quite a few fish. So I'm standing over my hole and and a good size northern comes into the hole from directly under my feet. I move slowly to pick the spear out of the small spot i chisled in the ice for it. By the time I get my spear set up another pike has came into the hole exactly accross from the first one and soon there was one on all four sides. Let me tell you when you are used to only seeing one fish every half our or so (if you're lucky) four fish in the hole all staring at my decoy really get's the blood pumping. So i pick the largest of the four (all were fairly similar in size) I move my spear over his head and just as I'm getting the spear in position the pike on my right turns to leave the hole and the pike from my left cruises accross the hole lightning quick right past my decoy and grabs the other pike right in the side as he is turned broadside to go. he takes him right out of the hole. the bottom gets all stirred up and I lay down on the ice and start yelling for everyone else to come see this. I'm trying to get a better angle to see under the ice, but at 4' thick you don't get much of an angle. totally forgot about the other two pike. finally i realized i should be spearing one of the other two that despite my best yell are still in thier original locations. I spear the biggest one and now the water is very stired up when i return to the hole after getting my fish off. And..... my decoy is way off to the left of the hole and out of site. i give it a jerk and it resists a bit and then comes back to the hole. the last pike didn't come back right away and i don't know if any of the fish I speared the rest of the trip were any of the ones I saw but that was pretty neat to watch.
    It's a real dod eat dog world down there when two pike roughly the same size try eating each other. Also saw some really really big trout in there that we thougt the lake wass all pike. I have no idea how the trout survives in that invironment.
    Justin
    Justin

  4. #4
    Member SperBear's Avatar
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    Default Flounder Pics

    Water Gremlin-

    LETS SEE THOSE PICS BABY!!!!!

  5. #5

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    Good story Adventures. I have never speared pike before but I can imagine myself spearing the mucky water like a blind wild man.

    It may not be during the winter but I watched a pike attack a duck on Fire Lake one day. That was pretty cool.

    When I get home I will load up some pics.

  6. #6

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    While this story didn't originate in Alaska, it is an ice fishing story. Took my son and two of his buddies fishing to a large midwestern res. There was a good sixteen inches of ice on the lake. We had our sled filled with all the necessary gear and were heading to a submerged island that normally produced good catches of walleye. The spot was about three fourths of a mile off the bank. I was quite conciously trying to teach the boys, all 12 years old at the time, some safety considerations and was stopping every hundred yards or so to check the depth and condition of the ice. We reached our spot and I proceeded to cut about thirty holes. After teaching the boys how to set the tip ups we were all busy getting the rigs out. I had cut the holes in a big circle with the sled in the middle. I headed toward the furthest hole with a rig and just as I got to it I heard the sickening sound of the the ice beneath me giving way. Next thing I knew I was neck deep. As I felt myself going through I thrust my arms as far out in front of me as I could which prevented me from dissapearing through the hole. I yelled at the boys to get the throw rope from the sled as I knew I didn't have much time before my clothing became saturated and I sank to the bottom of the lake. The closest boy to me threw me the line which I luckily was able to grab on the first throw. He wrapped the line around himself and flattened down on the ice. I was able to pull myself out of the hole with the aid of the rope. We exited the lake single file with twentyfive feet between us. Scarred the crap out of me! Apparently I had found the only thin spot on the whole lake. Without the throw rope I probably would have made the papers. GO PREPARED!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Talking Double hitter

    Some years ago my son-in-law Matt and I were fishing on Stormy Lake up near Nikiski. We each had a rod fishing a hole and were getting no hits at all. We had walked down on the ice because we saw no other vehicles, but when a truck came barreling down onto the lake and passed us, I decided to hoof it back up to the overlook and get the van because it was a really cold day and we wanted to warm up. I left my rod fishing in a holder and took off. While I was gone, Matt also left his rod to take a leak, and returned just in time to see his rod go down the hole. He reached down, but to no avail. At that very instance, my rod, which was about 10 feet away, bent over and started to go in too. Matt quickly reached out to grab it, and subsequently reeled in a very large dolly varden with his rod attached to it. Of all the directions the fish could have run, he had b-lined right toward my line and became entangled. Never had that happen on the ice before or after.

    Another time I leaned over the hole I was fishing and watched my brand new cell phone leap right out of the breast pocket of my Walls and down, down, down the hole glowing green all the way to the bottom. I think it attracted fish for awhile.

  8. #8

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    Heres a pic. I wish I had a better one but the only other I have is one of me and my ugly mug holding the fish when I got home. Funny looking burbot isnt it?


  9. #9
    Mark
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    Amazing. I was going to ask for the photo, too.

    Is the lake near tidewater?

    Did you identify the specific type of flounder? Is it an Alaska plaice?

  10. #10
    Member Stickle Back's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Amazing. I was going to ask for the photo, too.

    Is the lake near tidewater?

    Did you identify the specific type of flounder? Is it an Alaska plaice?
    Im pretty sure that is a stary flounder, you catch them salmon fishing in seward.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Amazing. I was going to ask for the photo, too.

    Is the lake near tidewater?

    Did you identify the specific type of flounder? Is it an Alaska plaice?

    Tight lips, tight lips.......

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Water_Gremlin View Post
    Tight lips, tight lips.......
    No doubt our opinions differ greatly on the issue of sharing information. I have no problem telling others where they can enjoy the bounties I have experienced and continue to find. Knowledge is useless, unless you are able to pass it on. Imagine a generation of idiots that had to learn everything for themselves. I don't know much myself, but I am willing to share the little I know.

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Wink Prying tight lips for info

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    No doubt our opinions differ greatly on the issue of sharing information. I have no problem telling others where they can enjoy the bounties I have experienced and continue to find. Knowledge is useless, unless you are able to pass it on. Imagine a generation of idiots that had to learn everything for themselves. I don't know much myself, but I am willing to share the little I know.
    Imagine arriving at your favorite spot and finding a bunch of people who heard from a friend of your friend about that spot. It's happened to me. More than once.

    I am thankful for all the info people have given me over the years (some I've really had to plead and cajole for), and I have given out my share as well, but the best knowledge has been knowledge I have aquired the hard way: through research and trial and error. People today want everything easy, including knowledge of where to hunt/fish. The best teacher is experience, and I only offer my own knowledge base to those who are willing to work for it themselves.

  14. #14

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    Imagine arriving at your favorite spot and finding a bunch of people who heard from a friend of your friend about that spot. It's happened to me. More than once.

    I am thankful for all the info people have given me over the years (some I've really had to plead and cajole for), and I have given out my share as well, but the best knowledge has been knowledge I have aquired the hard way: through research and trial and error. People today want everything easy, including knowledge of where to hunt/fish. The best teacher is experience, and I only offer my own knowledge base to those who are willing to work for it themselves.
    I completely agree with you there. Nothing else for me to really add to that.

  15. #15
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Starry flounder definently have been known to go pretty far up rivers and into fresh water, I guess this proves it.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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