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  1. #1
    Member MikeGSP's Avatar
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    Default Does anyone know aything about.......

    Does anyone know about the Cannon GL2 camera's for taking professional grade movies? I'm tossing the idea around on getting one as I have been getting into making my own movies. Do they all take the mini DV tapes, or are there digital ones? For the editing, do you need alot more equipment as the tapes don't fit in the computer? Is there a better brand out there than the other? I'm not looking at spending a lot, but some to get a decent one to start out with.

    Thanks,

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    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeGSP View Post
    Does anyone know about the Cannon GL2 camera's for taking professional grade movies? I'm tossing the idea around on getting one as I have been getting into making my own movies. Do they all take the mini DV tapes, or are there digital ones? For the editing, do you need alot more equipment as the tapes don't fit in the computer? Is there a better brand out there than the other? I'm not looking at spending a lot, but some to get a decent one to start out with.
    Thanks,
    Define 'professional grade'...it won't look like the Discovery channel stuff with a GL2...

    GL2's take miniDV tapes only

    You dont need any more equipment to edit than any other miniDV camera, connect the cam to your computer and hit 'play' on the cam and hit 'record' in your editing software..

    Keep in mind that is a SD cam, the footage is not nearly as impressive as an HD cam..

    I've owned a GL2 and finally sold it last summer...I just never used it anymore once I got an HD camera, no comparison....The GL2 was a very popular cam 7 to 10 years ago....I think they are still desired for the glass, zoom, etc...but someone else will have to chime in on the real reason...

    bottom line, an HD cam will give you better looking footage and the GL2 is not an HD camera
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    Member MikeGSP's Avatar
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    So all your saying is, go buy a handy digital HD camera and that will save me a few thousand dollars and get better quaility video? Whats the kind of videos that they use to shoot hunting shows?

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    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeGSP View Post
    So all your saying is, go buy a handy digital HD camera and that will save me a few thousand dollars and get better quaility video?
    that is not all I'm saying at all....the GL2 is a nice camera with good zoom, great glass, some pro features, etc....

    the GL2 is not a few thousand dollars...a used one runs $800 or so, depending on the included accessories, condition, etc...

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeGSP View Post
    Whats the kind of videos that they use to shoot hunting shows?
    broadcast TV is different than what you can achieve with a home production...they do not broadcast HD footage (well, some channels do now but I don't have cable so I don't know which ones)....

    what I am saying is you should take a look at the difference yourself and make a decision based on what is important to you...one thing is for sure, If I had $500+ to spend on a camera and great looking footage was my primary goal, I would not be buying a GL2...I shot with one for a few years and upgraded to a camera that only cost me $600 or so...


    here is a quote I found online, perhaps it explains it better than I can...

    The GL2 is still considered prosumer (or low-end pro) camcorder. The manual controls - focus, zoom, iris, audio level control, white balance, among others - are easier to get to. The large lens and large imaging chips (when compared to the smaller lens and imaging chips used by consumer cams - whether HD or not) will do a much better job in low-light situations. The lens set up makes for easier depth of field applications. The integrated "handle" makes for easier/steadier "run and shoot" video capture.

    If a consumer HDV cam and a GL2 are used on tripods next to each other under ideal light, yes, the consumer HDV cam will provide a much clearer video image - after all, HDV captures 4 times more video information than DV. And, if you use a Canon HV30, it does 24p and 30p capture that the GL2 does not do. The GL2 has been available for many years and is still considered a workhorse under many conditions.

    But your comparing these different categories of camcorders is like comparing a 2003 Cadillac CTS to a 2009 fully loaded Malibu.


    I'm currently using the 2009 maibu
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    Member MikeGSP's Avatar
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    Well put!! That sounds as if it might save me some money! I looked at the video I took yesterday out preadator calling and the fox I shot showed up better than I thought for the lighting conditions, it was 3:30pm. It was a little grainy but not bad none the less. So looks like I might be selling the one I have now and getting a HD one here. Any other advice you or anyone eles has, I'd gladly take into account.

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    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Canon GL2

    Mike,
    Below is what I posted on another thread on this subject.
    The long and short of it is, I do not think you would be happy with the GL2. Not for predator hunting and low light conditions anyway. On a sheep hunt they are awesome, but they loose the race Bit Time in low light conditions. One other things, is if you are going to shoot much video, you will want to go HD pretty quick. If would spend the money the 1st time if I had to do it all over again. Keeps you from buying another camera later down the road.

    Louis


    All,
    I will weigh in on this one. I now use the Sony HDR-1000. I used it for most of the footage in the Alaska Video Thread.
    I prefer tapes over hard drive, mostly because to the best of my knowledge the hard drives have not been able to record at the same resolution. I am not sure where current technology is with this format.

    I started shooting with the Canon GL2 which is a DV camera with an awesome 20x Optical Zoom Lens and at 2.2 lbs it was not too awful to add to the pack.
    The problems I had with the GL2 have been during low light conditions. It simply would not pull in enough light for some of the hunting that I do in the lower 48.
    The 2nd problem is that it does not shoot HDV.






    Two things that I have learned about shooting outdoor footage:
    • Low Light Performance is a must
    • A 20x Optical Lens (Especially in Alaska) is a must have.
    I purchased a Sony FX1 which is an awesome camera that shoots both DV and HDV and has awesome low light performance, but with only a 12x optical zoom, it just did not cut the mustard for hunting videos (at least for me). Sony uses a different format than Canon, so even shooting both cameras in DV the footage just would not deliver what I was looking for in and end result.
    So now I had two cameras that even collectively would not give me what I was looking for.

    Than Sony came out with the SONY HDR-1000 which is HDV/DV and has a 20x optical 72mm lens and touted excellent low light performance. Long and short of that is I sold the old cameras and bought this one and I have never regretted it. It truly is an awesome camera.

    Tapes: I usually reuse mine. One way to save tapes and hard drive is to download your final edited version on a single tape and reuse the tapes (3 or 4 in some cases) you used in the field.
    I also use an external hard drive to run and store all of my footage. Keeping the final version on tape ensures that I have a copy of the most important footage, without have to keep everything I record or risk a hard fault with my cpu.





    I use Pinnacle Studio 12 plus, which has tons of awesome features that I do not use. I mostly just cut out what I donít want to see and than let others do the fancy stuff with it. It is simple enough to figure out without much experience, which I did not have any when I 1st started.

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    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cusackla View Post
    the hard drives have not been able to record at the same resolution.
    not true...
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    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjm View Post
    not true...
    mostly because to the best of my knowledge the hard drives have not been able to record at the same resolution. I am not sure where current technology is with this format. That is the whole sentence.

    May not be. I just don't know that it is. I do know that i have not seen a camera crew using hard drives. Not sure why, but most all that i have been around ( Hunting The Country, Mike Avery's Outdoor, Cabelas Outfitter Journal) all run tapes.
    Louis

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    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cusackla View Post
    I do know that i have not seen a camera crew using hard drives. Not sure why
    I can think of 2 reasons, but I'm just guessing...

    1. The tape is less susceptible to damage from getting knocked around. Presumably, it is possible for you to lose footage from a hard drive model if it gets abused, much less likely if you use the solid state media such as an SD card, and probably even less likely if using a tape.

    2. The hard drive models save the footage in a different format, highly compressed. Perhaps it is the users' preference to work with the file format from the tapes. With todays computers, the larger file size from the hard drive models and added steps in the editing workflow is hardly an issue though.

    again, I'm just guessing....it sure is a pain in the butt to record footage to the computer from the tape....but that's the route I took as well...why?...just preference....
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    Member MikeGSP's Avatar
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    So TJM, what kind model of HD camera do you shoot with? I was looking at that Sony earlier, and it looks pretty nice, spendy but nice.

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    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeGSP View Post
    So TJM, what kind model of HD camera do you shoot with? I was looking at that Sony earlier, and it looks pretty nice, spendy but nice.
    I currently use the Canon HV30...again, just preference...most manufacturers make very nice cameras....I think I'd be happy with any of them

    The new HV40's MSRP for about $1000... but the competition is priced similarly....if I was hunting for a new camera I'd be going online looking for an older HV30...the only difference between the 30 and 40 is 24p offered in the 40 and one new 'quick set' button on the 40...other than that they are identical...

    the HV30's are getting hard to come by now as the 40's have been out for nearly a year now...but if you find one it will be the most bang for your buck...

    having said all that, I'd be willing to bet that I'd be thrilled with almost any of the newer cams out now... researching cameras can be a real pain after a while, sooner or later you just have to pull the trigger and go with your gut...if you find yourself in the valley I'd be happy to let you take the HV for a test drive...

    this thread from a few weeks back may be helpful for you...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=66013

    one thing to keep in mind if your editing software is not a newer version....some editing packages won't import certain file formats...check the format of the camera you're looking at and make sure you'll be able to edit the footage...Sony was bad about that years ago....as home video editing has become more popular, most of the newer editing packages can handle all but the most obscure formats...
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