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Thread: Grouse info

  1. #1
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    Default Grouse info

    Where are the grouse? I don't mean where do I need to go I mean where do they go in the winter time? I went hunting yesterday and didn't see one. This particular trail always delivers but I didn't see any. Are there signs to look for? I am new to grouse hunting. The few grouse I have got were just sitting on the trail. I would like to know some tips for finding them when they are not sitting on the trail. Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    Default In the woods

    If you didnt see them on the trail.. they were probably in the woods.. Usually 1-200 yards off, sititng in a spruce tree or under it.. Grouse actually get pounded pretty hard by people trail and road hunting as they tend to fly down before dark and eat some gravel.. also in the early morning too.. then they spend all day just wandering around eating.. they usually see you comming and HOLD still like a hair relying on their camo to conceal them.. My advice is to go slow.. and methodically pick apart the woods.. scanning.. and soon enough you will find em.. then hang in groups of 2-4 usually..

    Anyday in the woods is better than a day at work.. and not all sucess is measure by what you bring home..

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Sprucies will be in spruce this time of year. It takes a trained eye to spot them too!

    Ruffies will be in one of the ruffed grouse territory, (research this, no freebies here!) For them you will need to search out draws with thick brush in them. I am not sure what the particular type of tree is but it grows really thick and has little seed pods that the birds eat. The birds hide EXTREMELY well in this terrain!!

  4. #4

    Wink

    This is the poorest year for Grouse of all kinds, that I can remember. No hatch this spring and few adults survived the onslaught from the foxes and yotes. Better off to hunt some predators and leave the few remaining grouse for seed in the coming years.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Default

    Thanks for the replies. I was just told that grouse don't taste that good during the winter months. Any experience with that? I did see a lot of predator tracks. It might be time to try hunting them.

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    Default Finding Grouse

    OK~ I'll give you some tips along with everyone else that reads this... First I won't hunt grouse this late because the Sprusies don't taste that good now, and the ruffed don't need to be hunted when it's this cold an they're just trying to survive. That said, I use my springer to sniff them out for me. You'll find the spruce grouse just about everywhere there's a lot of growth, in particular around Fishhook Rd. or the Kenai Peninsula. The ruffs are around areas that have young quakey trees and wild cranberries in the undergrowth. A real good place for them is upstate New York.

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    Default

    Hm strange I have never had a problem with the taste in winter, They taste even better to me.

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    Default winter grouse

    Not sure which species your after, or even how far blue grouse range extends in Alaska, but blue grouse actually head up to the ridge tops in winter. In the western states I almost prefer to hunt them when they do this. It is awfully hard to get to them (that's half the adventure), but when you get into them they are more concentrated than any other time. It's not uncommon for me to see 30-40 on a good ridge.

  9. #9
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    Here's the short answers:

    Spruce grouse eat the same stuff as other grouse until late September when they change to a diet of spruce needles. Any recipe will then require the gulping down of two shots of whiskey prior to eating.

    Ruffed grouse (and I'm with Mr. Crupper on this and leave them alone in winter) move about very little during winter, especially when it's quite cold, like it gets here in the interior region. Ruffs will remain up high in a thick spruce tree fluffed up in a ball and nearest the trunk, or preferably under 12" or more of snow in a snow roost during long winter nights, and often come out only for 15 minute feeding frenzies early morning and late evening. If it is particularly cold, a ruffed grouse might not come out of its snow roost at all in the morning, but absolutely must come out and eat just before dark, or else it will not survive the night. Ruffs prefer aspen buds in winter.

    Sharptails do much the same as ptarmigan, they are bunched up, snow roost, eat dwarf birch buds, but will seek copses of spruce trees for security cover.

    All grouse (including ptarmigan) enjoy sunlight and can be found on south-facing slopes.

    Grouse are also quite aware that they stand out in stark contrast against the white snow and are easier targets for all that seek to kill and eat them.

    There are a number of books on this stuff. Some are offered for sale on this very web site.

    Jim

  10. #10

    Default

    I saw 3 grouse two days ago. They flew down to a little patch of gravel to get pebbles. The 3 grouse walked around for 4 minutes then flew back up into the huge spruce tree next to the road. The grouse have been there ever since. I see them daily, and they have not come back down do to the snow. Look up

  11. #11

    Default grouse

    hmm where exactly are those grouse hanging out at ?

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    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    Numbers were suppose to be down this year. I did decent though. I agree, i dont hunt them this late in the year. I had 6 spruce in the drive way the other day, and 2 ruffs a few days later. They know i give free passes this late in the year! Also since Mr. McCann didnt plug his book, i will. Its a great book for any grouse fanatic. Uplanding hunting in Alaska, or something like that. Lots info, great book.

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    Thanks, Hoyt!

    Jim

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    Member TruBluTex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    This is the poorest year for Grouse of all kinds, that I can remember. No hatch this spring and few adults survived the onslaught from the foxes and yotes. Better off to hunt some predators and leave the few remaining grouse for seed in the coming years.
    Sounds like a plan...when do you want to go?
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