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Thread: To change Remington Model 700 to Mauser action

  1. #1
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    Default To change Remington Model 700 to Mauser action

    I have a .416 Remington Model 700 and have trouble with reloading and bolting. The action sometimes allows the first cartridge to jump up before the actual bolt is pushed forward to reload and then when the bolt does move forward it picks up the next cartridge.

    This happens in variations, it starts by the cartridge lifting out from the front end first, if it doesnt pop out completely (the back is still in the box) it has a tendancy to "stand up" as the bolt is closed. If it does come out completely you have a double feed. Slower reloading helps and also when putting the cartridges in, making sure that all of them are seated properly in the box being right up against the back. It is as if the retaining lips are too thin/narrow.

    I have read a few articles that specify the .416 Remington in the Model 700 as having this problem and not recommending it as a dangerous game rifle due to the need for a fast bolt action.

    Does anyone have the same experience, are there any conversions or remedies out there?

    regards
    David

  2. #2

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    I think you should send it back to Remington and let them look it over.

  3. #3
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    Default Flawed

    Sounds like a design or manufacturing flaw if a bunch of people are having issues with the that gun in that caliber.

    I'd send it back to Remington and if they can't fix it to be 100% reliable trade it off to a Remington fan and get a controlled feed rifle that works. A dangerous game rifle is no place for a gun that malfuntions or can be easily jammed up.

    Quote Originally Posted by steyn View Post
    I have a .416 Remington Model 700 and have trouble with reloading and bolting. The action sometimes allows the first cartridge to jump up before the actual bolt is pushed forward to reload and then when the bolt does move forward it picks up the next cartridge.

    This happens in variations, it starts by the cartridge lifting out from the front end first, if it doesnt pop out completely (the back is still in the box) it has a tendancy to "stand up" as the bolt is closed. If it does come out completely you have a double feed. Slower reloading helps and also when putting the cartridges in, making sure that all of them are seated properly in the box being right up against the back. It is as if the retaining lips are too thin/narrow.

    I have read a few articles that specify the .416 Remington in the Model 700 as having this problem and not recommending it as a dangerous game rifle due to the need for a fast bolt action.

    Does anyone have the same experience, are there any conversions or remedies out there?

    regards
    David
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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  4. #4
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    This kind of makes sense...

    The 700 long action isn't really big enough for a full-lenght magnum but it works okay with the .375 H&H and 8mm Rem Mag because the cases are tapered enough to allow quick feeding from the front of the magazine box without jamming bullet noses into the bottom of the feed ramp. Open the case up a bit like the .416 Rem Mag, and they have to open the rails even further, causing the cartridge to pop out even earlier in the bolt cycle to avoid the bottom of the feed ramp, and sometimes it's just a smidge too loose and you get a mis-feed just like you're describing. Anytime there's feeding issues with a push-feed, the magazine lips are the first thing to check and in this case, I'd bet they're just a little too loose to properly control the cartridge. If it's new I'd suggest sending it back to Remington. If they won't look at it, take it to any of the gunsmiths local and they should be able to diagnose the problem and likely fix it with a little massaging of the feed rails.

  5. #5
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Have you taken the rifle apart and looked at the mag box & how it's situated in the receiver? ADL or BDL? Here are some things you can check:

    Make sure the mag box is fully seated into its recess in the receiver. Bend the very top corners of the mag box out, slightly, so that it better stays in place. You want the mag box to fit tightly into the receiver and stay put. On an ADL, sometimes the little tab at the back of the mag box is bent, and when you tighten the screw, it tweaks the mag box. In this case, I just bend the top corners to keep the mag box in place and leave the screw out all together.

    You can also adjust the feed lips on the mag box, itself, by bending them in or out. This gives the cartridge more or less contact with the feed rails in the action. If the round is coming out early (and it sound like it is), bend the mag box's lips outward to give the round more contact with the receiver's feed rails. The round should now stay in the magazine longer, and not jump the rails.

    Do your adjustments a little at a time, until it feeds properly. I use a small crescent wrench to do the bending. Tighten down the jaws of the crescent wrench, and just bend the top 1/8" to 1/4" of the mag box feed lips.

    Be mindful of rounds coming out on each side of the mag box. Sometimes they'll feed fine out of one side, but not the other. Concentrate your efforts to the side with feeding issues, as it pertains to mag box feed lips. Only bend the side that needs the help.

    If you have an ADL, use a piece of electrical tape to hold the magazine spring and follower in the proper location (one piece of tape, front to back, on the bottom of the mag box is fine). This will make it easier to properly assemble everything back into the stock.

    Lastly, check your follower. The follower should be fully seated on the magazine spring. The machined followers seem to work better than the stamped versions, especially in the .223 flavors. If everything above fails, I'd look at trying a different follower.



    ******* And, this should go without saying, use dummy rounds to check your feeding. You shouldn't be doing any of this with live rounds.

  6. #6
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    Default Amazing

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    You can also adjust the feed lips on the mag box, itself, by bending them in or out. This gives the cartridge more or less contact with the feed rails in the action. If the round is coming out early (and it sound like it is), bend the mag box's lips outward to give the round more contact with the receiver's feed rails. The round should now stay in the magazine longer, and not jump the rails.

    Do your adjustments a little at a time, until it feeds properly. I use a small crescent wrench to do the bending. Tighten down the jaws of the crescent wrench, and just bend the top 1/8" to 1/4" of the mag box feed lips.

    Be mindful of rounds coming out on each side of the mag box. Sometimes they'll feed fine out of one side, but not the other. Concentrate your efforts to the side with feeding issues, as it pertains to mag box feed lips. Only bend the side that needs the help.
    That's EXACTLY what I wooda said, but I probably couldn't have worded it as well.

    I had the same feeding problem with a Winchester Post 64 Mdl 70, and I came to the same conclusions, used the cresent wrench, on the side that I worked on, etc. right on down the line as you describe.

    Maybe, you were sending me telepatic messages.

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  7. #7
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    Dan
    A touch of Prussian Blue is a huge help in seeing where brass meets box... It should be consistent and include evidence of lateral movement of the cartridge. Otherwise it shows the cartridge is jumping out of the box rather than sliding.

    I would also add a little lip polish to make the kiss more gentle... Followed by Johnson's Paste Wax to maintain retention by geometry rather than friction...
    art

  8. #8
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    The rifle is not new, so there is no going back and trust me I have contemplated finding a Remington addict and moving it on, things just are not that easy where we are. Guns are more tools then toys at the moment, especially with financial and political red tape.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    Have you taken the rifle apart and looked at the mag box & how it's situated in the receiver? ADL or BDL? Here are some things you can check:

    Make sure the mag box is fully seated into its recess in the receiver. Bend the very top corners of the mag box out, slightly, so that it better stays in place. You want the mag box to fit tightly into the receiver and stay put. On an ADL, sometimes the little tab at the back of the mag box is bent, and when you tighten the screw, it tweaks the mag box. In this case, I just bend the top corners to keep the mag box in place and leave the screw out all together.

    You can also adjust the feed lips on the mag box, itself, by bending them in or out. This gives the cartridge more or less contact with the feed rails in the action. If the round is coming out early (and it sound like it is), bend the mag box's lips outward to give the round more contact with the receiver's feed rails. The round should now stay in the magazine longer, and not jump the rails.

    Do your adjustments a little at a time, until it feeds properly. I use a small crescent wrench to do the bending. Tighten down the jaws of the crescent wrench, and just bend the top 1/8" to 1/4" of the mag box feed lips.

    Be mindful of rounds coming out on each side of the mag box. Sometimes they'll feed fine out of one side, but not the other. Concentrate your efforts to the side with feeding issues, as it pertains to mag box feed lips. Only bend the side that needs the help.

    If you have an ADL, use a piece of electrical tape to hold the magazine spring and follower in the proper location (one piece of tape, front to back, on the bottom of the mag box is fine). This will make it easier to properly assemble everything back into the stock.

    Lastly, check your follower. The follower should be fully seated on the magazine spring. The machined followers seem to work better than the stamped versions, especially in the .223 flavors. If everything above fails, I'd look at trying a different follower.



    ******* And, this should go without saying, use dummy rounds to check your feeding. You shouldn't be doing any of this with live rounds.
    Thank you for that, however excuse the ignorance, ADL? and BDL? I will definetely be stripping it down this weekend and giving it a look over along the guidelines you have prescribed.

    Thank you to for advice on dummy rounds, unfortunately not so easily available in this neck of the woods.

    Regards
    David

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by steyn View Post
    Thank you for that, however excuse the ignorance, ADL? and BDL?

    Regards
    David
    BDL & ADL are simply two of the many different models in which Remington 700s come/have come--I don't think the ADL is still being offered from Remington. Typically what is meant in their comparison concerns the floor plate, or lack thereof. BDL has a hinged floor plate and the ADL has only a simple trigger guard with no access to the magazine from the belly of the stock. The BDL/hinged floor plate allows quick unloading and cleaning of the magazine whereas the ADL requires removing the cartridges as they cycle through the action.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by steyn View Post
    Thank you to for advice on dummy rounds, unfortunately not so easily available in this neck of the woods.

    Regards
    David
    David
    At minimum remove the firing pin before cycling it will not have any effect on feeding issues and at least eliminates most of the potential bad things which can happen while messing with guns.

    To remove it easily hold the bolt against a hard edge so the cocking piece (The long slender, notched part that rides in the groove in the bottom of the action) notch is held and pull the bolt perpendicular to the edge.

    This will expose a notch in the cocking piece on the stem coming through the bolt shroud. Put a dime in the slot and release tension. The dime will hold the cocking piece back and allow the entire shroud, firing pin, firing pin spring, and cocking piece to be unscrewed from the bolt body.

    Some do not have the notch and will require more pull to expose a shoulder on the cocking piece.

    Some folks prefer to use a boot lace rather than a board to hold the cocking piece back... And it is very easy to do. Just make a loop of lace and hook it on the cocking piece. Always be careful as the firing pin spring does not grant any forgiveness when it slips and flesh caught in tight spots will disappear.

    With firing pin out the rifle is a lot safer to test load...

    When reassembling, make sure the cocking piece is captured in the notch on the end of the bolt body just off the angled end of the cocking ramp.
    art

  12. #12
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    Thank you for that. Will be experimenting shortly.

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