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Thread: marmot helium sleeping bag...down??

  1. #1
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    Default marmot helium sleeping bag...down??

    Thinking of buying this down sleeping bag to save on weight and room. Anyone use a down bag, or this one?

    Any comments either way on down or synthetic when space and weight are a concern?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Marmot Helium

    I bought the marmot helium a couple of years ago to cut weight on backpacking hunts. The bag compresses into the size of a loaf of bread and is rated to 15 degrees. I wish the zipper was full length but I don't think you will find very many bags that are this light and still rated to 15 degrees. I have never had any problems with using a down bag in Alaska. Keep it dry as you would any sleeping bag!

  3. #3
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    When I finally made the decision to purchase this bag I went with the "Heliun EQ" - I figured that if I was going to spend that kind of $ might as well go the rest of the way...besides the water resistance it is a lot more wind/draft resistent. Mine has a full zipper...but still on the left.

  4. #4
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    Talking Keep it dry.

    As was stated above, keep your bag dry. I only problem with a down bag is, if it gets wet, they are hard to dry out and not as warm when wet. I prefer the Northface Galioth which is rated at 0*F. It comes with a stuff sack, and you can really compress it. I have had my Northface bag dripping wet, it took a swim, but once I got into it, it warmed up and dried out. It pulls the moisture from inside the bag to the outside while drying.

    Hope this helps.
    Mark

  5. #5
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    Red face Watch the loft?

    There is nothing like a good down bag, they pack better and weigh less than the synth. types. If you keep them dry that is! However if your out for more than a few days in a damp environment be prepared to loose a little loft. And remember with the decrease in loft, goes the decrease in warmth! No way to get away from this, as you exhale, and perspire water all night. I'm a long time backpacker, hunter that uses bolth types of bags in temps from the 50's to below O. Matter of fact the down bags do better in constant cold temps IMHO. Just something to consider. Bill.

  6. #6
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    Default

    I prefer down fill for cold weather bags. My warm weather bag is synthetic.

    Fluff the down bag and let it air before you stuff it and you won't have any problems with compressing it and re-lofting the next night.

  7. #7
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    Default

    plentycoupe, its tough, I know what you are after trying to find the lightest and most compressible bag for sheep hunting, its going to be a down bag. There are some bad azz down bags out there that weigh less than 2 lbs and compress to the size of a loaf of bread, and I have contemplated making the shift from synthetic to down myself but I am too scared of the what if it gets wet. Alaska can be so unkind at times in the mountains and when she wips your but it would at least be nice to know that your gear will get you through it. I have been using the cats meow at less than 3lbs it has proven its qualities to me, cant imagine how I'd feel if I went the down route and I am laying there in the tent freezing my wet butt off on top of a mountain and thinking why did I insist on shaving that 1 lb and now I am screwed, scares me to death! Then on the other hand if the weathers good and your moving around spike camping a lot it sure would be nice to have that 2 lbs loaf of bread in your pack. Your call buddy, wither way let us know how it works out if you go down!

  8. #8
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    Default

    Isn't the helium made with some kind of waterpoof or water resistant breathable material? Seems like some outfit makes them like that but they are pretty spendy. Marmot or Mtn. Hardware maybe?

    I second the Cat's Meow though. Works good.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  9. #9
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default North Face Orion

    I used the North Face Orion (long) rated at 20 degrees. It weighs 2lb 8 oz and compresses to a football. While hunting sheep this year in the bivy the bag was always wet from my body heat on the bottom. If I woudld have had a down bag it would have never dried and would have lost it's warmth rating.
    an extra pound is worth it to me IMHO.

  10. #10
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default My Momma...

    ...didn't raise no fool.

    Synthetic all the way and back.

    Just my most-humble opinion.

    Taylor

  11. #11
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    Default Helium EQ

    Snyd,

    shphtr's bag is the waterproof one. It's called the Marmot Helium EQ (2 lbs. 3 oz.) rated at 15 degrees F with 900 fill goose down.

    http://marmot.com/products/product.p...style_id=I2013


    I've had this exact bag for 3 seasons now and it works flawlessly. I use it here in Southeast in all weather conditions, as well as up north in sheep country. I guestimated the number of days I've spent in this bag and came up with around 75 days. This may be a little low, as I train a lot on overnighters, so I may be missing a few days here and there. Many of these trips include using bivies, which are susceptible to dampness through breathing and condensation via body warmth. On all occasions, the water never penetrated the bag. The dampness on the outside does not seem to effect the loftness much at all. I don't hesitate to take this bag out in ANY weather.

    With the EQ, you get the best of both worlds...

    1) It is lightweight and compresses to football-size using a Granite Gear Air Compressor X-Small Compression Sack (2.5 oz).

    2) It is waterproof - eliminating all of the "reluctance" to buy a down bag that will be used in wet weather.

    It is fairly expensive, but for me - it's worth it.

    I' was so impressed, that I purchased a new Marmot Couloir Dryloft 0 degree bag off of eBay for the colder trips. It is also down, waterproof, and weighs 2 lbs 15 oz (older model in short size, but fits me fine @ 5' 10"). It has a little more loft, so I use a Small-size Compression Sack (3 oz) instead of the XS.

    I always baby them by hanging them loosely indoors.

    --Shawn
    Last edited by rain4est; 01-04-2007 at 13:27. Reason: add a line on lofting

  12. #12
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    Ah. That's the one I must have been thinking about that I liked but couldn't afford! I too hang my bags. Thanks for the clarification.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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