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Thread: Fishing kit in Survival kit

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    Default Fishing kit in Survival kit

    I have noticed everyone seems to think fishing gear is a good idea in a survival kit. I would like to hear opinions as to why. When I was in the military all our kits had fishing gear, but this was because rescue was not always possible and there was a real possibility you could be stuck out several months before rescue. Therefore procuring food was a requirement.

    However, for the week long or weekend trip, I really don't see the need for fishing gear. If something happens, one could expect rescue within a week at the most.

    I read somewhere the best source of quick energy is butter, which is what Shakelton used on his trips. Another source I read, recommended traveling with tubes of cake frosting because it is the next best thing to butter. So for the short term survival situation why not just carry this. And for the long term, the human body can last quite a while without food. The frosting is for the situations like extreme cold where you need fast energy.

    Thoughts?

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    I carry a very small fishing kit inside my emergency kit. It fits in a plastic tube about 1/2" dia by 1" long. My primary reason for carrying it is that in addition to being used to catch fish, it can also be used for emergency stitches or an emergency sewing kit. I also carry a standard needle.

    I wouldn't preclude using a fishing kit in an emergency situation. If you're waiting for rescue, at the very minimum it could give you something to do and at best it gives you something to eat. While perhaps not necessary, a good warm meal is a huge morale booster, and my fish are more plentiful in many areas of Alaska than is wild game.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    ....my ears perked up when you mentioned butter...
    -I love butter, and eat a lot of it-

    ...I read somewhere years ago, that if you ingest large amounts of butter, you don't have to wear deoderant....
    -it really works....



    Quote Originally Posted by Rickb1b View Post
    I have noticed everyone seems to think fishing gear is a good idea in a survival kit. I would like to hear opinions as to why. When I was in the military all our kits had fishing gear, but this was because rescue was not always possible and there was a real possibility you could be stuck out several months before rescue. Therefore procuring food was a requirement.

    However, for the week long or weekend trip, I really don't see the need for fishing gear. If something happens, one could expect rescue within a week at the most.

    I read somewhere the best source of quick energy is butter, which is what Shakelton used on his trips. Another source I read, recommended traveling with tubes of cake frosting because it is the next best thing to butter. So for the short term survival situation why not just carry this. And for the long term, the human body can last quite a while without food. The frosting is for the situations like extreme cold where you need fast energy.

    Thoughts?

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EagleRiverDee View Post
    I carry a very small fishing kit inside my emergency kit. It fits in a plastic tube about 1/2" dia by 1" long. My primary reason for carrying it is that in addition to being used to catch fish, it can also be used for emergency stitches or an emergency sewing kit. I also carry a standard needle.

    I wouldn't preclude using a fishing kit in an emergency situation. If you're waiting for rescue, at the very minimum it could give you something to do and at best it gives you something to eat. While perhaps not necessary, a good warm meal is a huge morale booster, and my fish are more plentiful in many areas of Alaska than is wild game.
    This is exactly what I was going to reply! A few yards of line and a hook dont amount to much for carry, so might as well do it.

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    Survival gear? A gill net is survival gear. Hook and line is for sport.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Survival gear? A gill net is survival gear. Hook and line is for sport.
    Yes but we are discussing things that are practical to carry in a small survival kit. If we could take the kitchen and the sink, survival probably wouldn't be an issue. We're not talking about stocking up for winter, just having a warm meal in your belly while you wait for rescue. And, of course, it's seasonal. I take the fishing gear out of my survival kit in the winter. I am not going to dig a hole through 2 feet of ice with a pocket knife, so regardless of how light the gear is, it's worthless in winter and it comes out. I'll add another survival blanket in its place.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    I've stopped carrying much 550 cord as a "survival" item. If you want lightweight, strong cord, buy a spool of 75-lb braided fishing line. It'll save you a lot of space and weight; you can carry 1000 feet of the stuff in the same space as 25 feet of 550. Add a couple of hooks folded in a piece of tape and you have a basic fishing kit.

    I'll agree with you- there's probably almost never the survival situation that requires food. Yeah, we can last quite a bit longer that many people seem to think. But it is nice to have something to go fishing with when hiking or camping if the whim hits you, survival situation or not.
    Χάρις υμίν καί είρήνη άπό θεου...

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    I've always wondered about fishing gear in survival kits. I read once "It can also be used for catching birds" or something like that. The only fish hooks I'd want in a survival situtation are snagging hooks (treble hooks with lead on the shank), but I've only ever seen them for sale in Seward.

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    If you're honest with yourself you'll admit that there are days at the peak fishing times when you've taken very specific bait with very specialized gear to very hot holes and you still get skunked. What makes you think carrying a generic hook with a few feet of line into the wilderness during random seasons will be worth any effort? Define "practical".

  10. #10
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    It doesnt take much to catch a fish in a survival situation. Grayling, trout, dollies ect, will readily eat a cranberry on a hook. Or a piece of orange surveyors flagging. Or wrap a piece of squirrel or rabbit fur on a hook. Or you can just dig up a caddis or dragon fly nymph.

    If salmon are around try and catch those with your hands instead.

    But if the salmon are around so are the easier to catch trout, grayling ect and that is what you should focus on.

    I think it pretty agreed upon here that being in a survival situation long enough to warrant take of fish and game is pretty remote. But I dont see the problem if someone wants to take a few feet of line and a hook.

    Besides when in need, you might find another use for it like fixing your wheeler, backpack, lean-to building, sewing a rip in your jacket and the like.

    Often times my survival kit contents are used for completly different uses than what they were origanilly intended for.

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    You guys are confusing survival and camping. Douse yourself in gas and light a match. Put yourself out. Go camping. Or do the same thing but break both legs and give yourself a concussion. Then go camping. Or imagine those things happening to your wife. Put a cranberry on a hook and go fishing so she can eat.

    Survival isn't summer camp. Have a nice night.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    You guys are confusing survival and camping. Douse yourself in gas and light a match. Put yourself out. Go camping. Or do the same thing but break both legs and give yourself a concussion. Then go camping. Or imagine those things happening to your wife. Put a cranberry on a hook and go fishing so she can eat.

    Survival isn't summer camp. Have a nice night.
    I don't think anyone here is confused.

    If someone is in an airplane crash and has 3rd degree burns, no small survival kit is going to be of any assistance. If they are in a major accident, and break two legs, same thing.

    Most of us are considering the more likely possibility of spending the night or two in the wilderness due to a mechanical failure on an ATV, getting lost etc where injury is minor or non-existent and the entire point is remaining relatively warm, dry and comfortable until rescue arrives.

    We're all aware there are different degrees of survival situation. The ones you list no amount of gear is going to help much- what you need is a medivac.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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