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Thread: New rifle build questions

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    Default New rifle build questions

    My brother is going to build me a new rifle this winter. Its going to be a big bore on a Mauser action. He suggests a .416 Taylor for economics, action lenth. I am thinking of a .416 Rem. Any suggestions or thoughts.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    My brother is going to build me a new rifle this winter. Its going to be a big bore on a Mauser action. He suggests a .416 Taylor for economics, action lenth. I am thinking of a .416 Rem. Any suggestions or thoughts.
    What are your plans for this rifle; what and where are you going to hunt?

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    I will use it for bears and if I were to get a buffalo tag. Plus a guy can never have to many cool rifles.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Default .416 or similar

    I picked up a similar mauser rifle except .40 cal instead of .416 - also based on the standard short magnum cases. It is fun to shoot, packs a good punch and used inexpensive brass etc. I also have a .416 barrel I may turn into a .416 Taylor since I already have dies etc.

    The .416 Rem uses more espensive brass, more powder, and is a pain to fit to standard mauser action.

    Go for the .416 Taylor!


    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    My brother is going to build me a new rifle this winter. Its going to be a big bore on a Mauser action. He suggests a .416 Taylor for economics, action lenth. I am thinking of a .416 Rem. Any suggestions or thoughts.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Go with the .416 rem. No problem making it work, difference in cost of brass is nominal, factory ammo available and if you ever decide you dont like it, higher resale value

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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    I will use it for bears and if I were to get a buffalo tag. Plus a guy can never have to many cool rifles.
    There's not much to choose between them ballistically speaking. The 416 RM gets about 100-150 fps more velocity, but the Taylor is fast enough. IMO the most desirable attribute of a DGR is its ability to function properly. Of course you need sufficient accuracy and power, but if the rifle is not 100% reliable then it is of no value to me as DGR. I do not know your brother and he may be an outstanding gunsmith, but IME trying to lengthen a Mauser (3.4) action for the longer cartridge (3.65) takes a smith with a great deal of experience to have it function 100% reliably. This can be done, and is quite often, but I have seen many Mauser actions butchered in that process. It is much easier to only deal with the feeding rails to digest the larger cartridge case (belted magnum compared to .473 head size) than increasing the COL of the action. So if you have a Mauser with a magazine box that is around 3.4 inches long I would choose the Taylor. However if you have a longer action the 416 RM has the advantage of factory ammo and will be much easier to sell should that notion ever hit you. If your brother/gunsmith is recommending the Taylor I would take his advice as he is the one considering the changes necessary to make it function properly and there isn't any significant difference between them IMO.

    Regardless which cartridge you choose I would select a 21-22 inch barrel and I would want some type of iron sights. NECG makes several types of banded front sight bases and they are durable and very attractive. I personally do not care for an Express type rear sight and would use some type of rear aperture instead. There are no doubt others, but these come to mind: NECG makes a peep sight that attaches to a Weaver-type base, XS makes a ghost ring for a Weaver-type base (my preference) and Talley makes a back up peep sight for their detachable bases all of which can be paired to a detachable scope. I like a low power scope on my rifle for this purpose and prefer it in most situations, but there is no denying the benefit that a scopeless gun offers in handling and crawling through the alders; the iron sights are also unaffected by the weather.

    I prefer synthetic stocks (McMillan & MPI are excellent) and rust resistant finishes for the way I hunt, but blued steel and wood can be very serviceable given the proper care. You can keep the sling swivel stud on the forearm as the 416 just doesn't have enough recoil to mandate a barrel mounted stud. The barrel mounted stud (banded or otherwise) is a nice looking touch, but it is not necessary. The aftermarket 3 position safeties are a nice upgrade IMO and are worth considering.

    I would try to keep total gun weight to around 8.5-9.0 pounds to make it comfortable to both carry and shoot. I would also recommend the Hornady 400 grain Interlock RN. It is near perfect for this scenario. It is sufficiently flat for 250 yard shots, it has excellent terminal performance and it is inexpensive enough to shoot quite a bit. Anyways, these are just my thoughts.

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    I've decided on the .416 Taylor mostly because my brother has found everything I need sans the stock for 400 dollars. He is a huge fan of the cartridge, but to be fair he also is a huge fan of the .338 win mag, 7 mm rem, the .458 win mag, the .375 Taylor are you seeing a pattern here
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    I've decided on the .416 Taylor mostly because my brother has found everything I need sans the stock for 400 dollars. He is a huge fan of the cartridge, but to be fair he also is a huge fan of the .338 win mag, 7 mm rem, the .458 win mag, the .375 Taylor are you seeing a pattern here
    You'll be pleased with the performance of the Taylor. Come on now, how about share some more details on the rifle.

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    Good choice, I'm building a 375 taylor on a VZ-24. What action are you using?

  10. #10

    Default Ditto

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    There's not much to choose between them ballistically speaking. The 416 RM gets about 100-150 fps more velocity, but the Taylor is fast enough. IMO the most desirable attribute of a DGR is its ability to function properly. Of course you need sufficient accuracy and power, but if the rifle is not 100% reliable then it is of no value to me as DGR. I do not know your brother and he may be an outstanding gunsmith, but IME trying to lengthen a Mauser (3.4) action for the longer cartridge (3.65) takes a smith with a great deal of experience to have it function 100% reliably. This can be done, and is quite often, but I have seen many Mauser actions butchered in that process. It is much easier to only deal with the feeding rails to digest the larger cartridge case (belted magnum compared to .473 head size) than increasing the COL of the action. So if you have a Mauser with a magazine box that is around 3.4 inches long I would choose the Taylor. However if you have a longer action the 416 RM has the advantage of factory ammo and will be much easier to sell should that notion ever hit you. If your brother/gunsmith is recommending the Taylor I would take his advice as he is the one considering the changes necessary to make it function properly and there isn't any significant difference between them IMO.

    Regardless which cartridge you choose I would select a 21-22 inch barrel and I would want some type of iron sights. NECG makes several types of banded front sight bases and they are durable and very attractive. I personally do not care for an Express type rear sight and would use some type of rear aperture instead. There are no doubt others, but these come to mind: NECG makes a peep sight that attaches to a Weaver-type base, XS makes a ghost ring for a Weaver-type base (my preference) and Talley makes a back up peep sight for their detachable bases all of which can be paired to a detachable scope. I like a low power scope on my rifle for this purpose and prefer it in most situations, but there is no denying the benefit that a scopeless gun offers in handling and crawling through the alders; the iron sights are also unaffected by the weather.

    I prefer synthetic stocks (McMillan & MPI are excellent) and rust resistant finishes for the way I hunt, but blued steel and wood can be very serviceable given the proper care. You can keep the sling swivel stud on the forearm as the 416 just doesn't have enough recoil to mandate a barrel mounted stud. The barrel mounted stud (banded or otherwise) is a nice looking touch, but it is not necessary. The aftermarket 3 position safeties are a nice upgrade IMO and are worth considering.

    I would try to keep total gun weight to around 8.5-9.0 pounds to make it comfortable to both carry and shoot. I would also recommend the Hornady 400 grain Interlock RN. It is near perfect for this scenario. It is sufficiently flat for 250 yard shots, it has excellent terminal performance and it is inexpensive enough to shoot quite a bit. Anyways, these are just my thoughts.

    While this is verry solid advice, there is a NEW ALTERNATIVE. Ruger came out with it's 416 Ruger. Feeds on the long action, unbelted, and uses the same bolt face as the 300- 416 Taylor rounds, FACTORY AMMO.
    That said before this round was thought of I built a 416 Taylor.
    ENJOY your project!
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  11. #11
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    When I have the scope and stock picked out I'll give all the details I am jazzed.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    Picked out a Hogue stock
    I'm thinking a 1.5xsomthing for a scope

    any Ideas?
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    Default Scope

    Something like a Leupold VX III 1.75 - 6X would be a good choice in an affordable scope. The Zeiss 1.8 - 5.5 x 38 is another good choice.

    I'd get a scope with a front objective lense larger than the tube so your exit pupil is larger on the highest magnification. Also watch the eye relief on a magnum rifle esp. a light weight one.

    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    Picked out a Hogue stock
    I'm thinking a 1.5xsomthing for a scope

    any Ideas?
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    I have a Leupold 1.5x5 VXIII on my 458, and it has become my absolute favorite scope. Of course when I'm hunting things usually get shot at 3X magnification because thats where I keep it set and I dont usually change it before the shot. That being said Leupold makes a nice fixed 2.5 that will be cheaper than the 1.5x5, I have one of those as well and like it alot.

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    See no reason to go with the Taylor. Building up a 416 myself and decided to go with the standard Ruger 416.
    Tennessee

  16. #16
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    I would be putting an old 3x leupold on it. the new short tube 2.5 can be a bear to mount, especially when dealing with mausers of length... Too many times the objective lens has to go inside the front ring.

    At 3x the straight tube gives more exit pupil than most can use... And it is certainly adequate. It is also regarded as the toughest scope made by a lot of boomer builders of note. The variables are still inclined to have more problems than fixed powers on big stuff...
    art

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    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    I would be putting an old 3x leupold on it. the new short tube 2.5 can be a bear to mount, especially when dealing with mausers of length... Too many times the objective lens has to go inside the front ring.

    At 3x the straight tube gives more exit pupil than most can use... And it is certainly adequate. It is also regarded as the toughest scope made by a lot of boomer builders of note. The variables are still inclined to have more problems than fixed powers on big stuff...
    art
    I agree with hap. I replaced a 1.5x5 Vari-X III on a 416 RM with a M8-3X and have concluded it is a perfect match for my rifle and my purposes. It is lighter and IMO better looking than the 1.5x5, though I will quickly add the 1.5x5 Leupold is durable to a fault. There are rumors that the M8-3X may be reintroduced, but if you want one they are available on the used market for less than a 1.5x5 and of course are lifetime warrantied if there is any problem.

    Keep us posted.

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    Getting the bolt jeweled and caliber stamped still have not picked a scope getting excited to shoot this beast.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  19. #19

    Smile try...

    I have owned the old Leupold 3x scope. I also have the 1.5 x5 with the German #4 and the 1.75 x 6 with the Post Duplex reticle. The last 2 are from Leupold's Custom Shop. The 3x is not as fast as the other 2 if they are on low power and it does not transmit light as well as the lens is not of equal quality. Yet it is good enough and hard enough to find that it is now developing a unique reputation. That 1.75 x 6 with the Post Duplex reticle is a very practical scope for Alaska. Supposedly it is Leupold's toughest variable. Try it, you will like it.

  20. #20
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    Can't disagree with any of the ideas posted so far. Make no mistake about recoil as it pertains to scope choice, stock choice and matters of shooting ergonomics (can I say that word here) any of the big boomers do recoil. Not that it matters much when needed in the field but range time is sooo important. Also, ditto to the idea of 100% function and reliability is a must for one of DGRs!

    One thing I haven't seen mentioned, so I'll throw it out there. If the rifle were ever to be used for international hunting, unless I'm mistaken and no such issues currently exist- SO ANYONE EXPERT IN THESE MATTERS PLEASE JUMP IN, certain jurisdictions may require that the ammo headstamp match the gun's cartridge/caliber markings. No problem for the 416 Ruger, 416 Rem, 416 Rigby, etc. but a 416 Taylor gun with 458 Win brass headstamp may raise an eyebrow of some bureaucrat somewhere. Is that unfounded paranoia or international reality?

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