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Thread: new machine engine break in

  1. #1
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    Default new machine engine break in

    When you get a brand spankin' new machine what is the preferred method for breaking the motor in? Is it to run it for however long before going above a certain RPM and all that goes along with that method; or just mash the trigger and go for it?
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default When in doubt...

    ... consult the manual.

  3. #3
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    Default

    My new Arctic Cat's say don't go over half throttle for the first tank of gas.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    Take it easy for the first tank and add a shot of oil to the first "couple of tanks" was the advice I got. But like Sayak said it's in your manual.
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    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Default

    i use the second choice....what kind of sled?
    ------------------------------------------------
    pull my finger....

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    Default break in

    just got a new yamaha vkpro...manual said to keep it under 1/2 throttle the first 300 miles...good luck with that...i tried to do that but the engine was begging me to go full throttle, so i obliged.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    i tried to do that but the engine was begging me to go full throttle, so i obliged.
    Don't worry, I haven't seen a sled yet fail due to "poor" break in. In fact, most of those demo sleds the dealers have..the high performance ones..are rode full throttle from the first mile. I rode a full pull run on a Cat Crossfire 1000 last year and put the third miles on it. It's still alive and kicking after a full year of demo abuse.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  8. #8
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    I believe what you don't want to do is ride at one speed/ RPMs for too long. Varying the RPMs as much as possible will prevent an engine from developing a flat spot in the throttle curve (or so I've heard/ read).

    A 1/2 cup to cup of oil directly into the first tank or two of gas is also suggested. As is changing the belt after the first 100 miles or so to give you practice (if needed) and so you will have 2 belts broken in.

    I don't buy into remaining at < 1/2 throttle for the entire break in period, however. Obviously isn't NOT a good idea to run your machine from cold to sustained high speed/ RPMs right away, but I don't see how easing up to some higher RPMs for short periods, with a good cooldown period afterwards, is a bad thing.

  9. #9

    Default break in

    I know theirs going to be a ton of folks argue with what I'm about to say but here's my theory, like it or not. I've been building engines for 25 years, many were drag cars, tractor pullers, mud rigs and drag bikes, lots running alcohol or blowers and now it's sleds. Not one of them ever had a break in period. From day one I run my new sled's (6 so far) the way I'm going to run them as long as I own them. They have all lasted without problems. If an engine comes apart when perfectly in spec (new) how could you ever expect it to last thousands of miles. As a matter of fact, engines come apart for a reason, and it's not lack of break in, something has malfunctioned (ie oil pump, lean mixture etc) or it was out of spec from day one.
    Another way I look at it is, most people excluding AK and a few area's in the lower 48, only put a few hundred miles on each year. So as a manufacturer, if I can get people to take it easy on my product for the first season, by the next season most of the warrenties are expired. It's a win win for the man.
    Now like someone says above, always warm your sled up, regardles of age. Reving a cold engine is asking for disaster.
    As for the adding oil to the gas, Although I do not do it, I'm not sure if it's bad or good. I've read alot on the subject, and the general thought now, is it leans out the fuel mixture, not sure I buy it.
    In my mind, sleds are like two stroke dirt bikes, a small engine tuned to put out tons of horse power and torque = a grenade. Yes I'm talking about us guys that only know two throttle positions, idle and wide open. Now I'm going to sit and wait for the verbal beating to start.

  10. #10

    Default

    Years ago, (late 1960's) Mercedes Benz advertized their autos by saying that each engine, before being installed in a new car, was run at full throttle for one hour, while the oil was being changed once per minute and filtered. Could be that this was their way of breaking in an engine for the consumer?

    I think all manufacturers ought to do this. Cars, trucks lawnmowers, tractors, chain saws, 4 wheelers, etc.

    Why don't the snowmachine manufacturers break-in the engines on a bench? This could be automated. It would cost more. Sure it would - say $25 more? $100? They could use the optimum temps, oil, mix, etc.

    This is a no-brainer and really is a rip-off if you think about it for 60 seconds.
    Last edited by Jaymac; 11-27-2009 at 01:59. Reason: words

  11. #11
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Vmaxxer- I know a very reputable snowmobile engine builder, with tons of wins in drag racing in the midwest, as well as building huge quantities of custom engines for western mountain riding, that doesn't believe in engine break-in. He seats the rings on a new rebuild by pulling over the sled, without the heads on it, 50 times on dry cylinders. Assemble the rest of the engine and go riding.

    I did the same thing on my last two engine rebuilds and the sleds have run fine for a long time.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  12. #12
    Member mit's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ... consult the manual.
    First answer and correct answer. I would add; that you do what the dealer you bought it from said. That is, if you expect to get warranty coverage.
    Tim

  13. #13
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    I ran my mine hard to seat the piston rings...

    http://www.ntnoa.org/enginebreakin.htm


    seems credible to me..

    and went ahead with an extended warranty..lol

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  14. #14
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    Default

    just got new sleds and it says one pint of oil to 5 gallons of gas for the first tank and vary the rpms and don't run wide open. I cant ride till tuesday but ill tell you if they blow up.

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