Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: need info... on flying bears into unit 20 awhle back

  1. #1
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default need info... on flying bears into unit 20 awhle back

    Okay does any one have any documentation stored on when they transfered bears from the McGrath area over to 20A? i have asked for a number of how many bears have been flown from F&G

    the last population survey was in 1995/1996

    i am working on a proposal to extend the grizzly hunting season in unit 20 A
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  2. #2
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    I think Cathie Harms was involved with that, not sure which side she was on, might look her up.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Mcgrath relocation

    This may be the link. In states the relocation occurred in 2003 and 2004 and was 125 bears total. Thats a lot of bears!!! Hey, while you are at it consider the start dates of the Brown Bear season in 20. I think it stinks that early season hunters cant shoot brown bears, especially when there is no shortage of them!

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/manag...lan_mar_09.pdf
    Last edited by Sollybug; 11-23-2009 at 10:40. Reason: additional info
    “I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. “ Fred Bear

  4. #4
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sollybug View Post
    This may be the link. In states the relocation occurred in 2003 and 2004 and was 125 bears total. Thats a lot of bears!!! Hey, while you are at it consider the start dates of the Brown Bear season in 20. I think it stinks that early season hunters cant shoot brown bears, especially when there is no shortage of them!

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/manag...lan_mar_09.pdf
    thanks solly working on that start date as we speak...

    take a peak at the poll in the bear bait forum... would be great if i could get a bunch of bait runners inputs. on the grizz
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    FAI
    Posts
    2,294

    Default not 20A

    those bears, best I can recall, were relocated further north. That same spring, I spotted a collared bear with a tag at my bait site in 20A. I was able to get the info from it by using binoculars. The bear was a sow that had been flown out of Mcgrath as part of the relocation effort, and had made its way south almost 100 miles in a matter of weeks. Again, if memory serves me correctly she had been dropped north and west of Livengood.

  6. #6
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    actually AKRR... i talked to the bio and they "distributed" them throughout the unit 20. and supposedly only afew bears went into any one unit... but i remember finding diapers from transport out the rex. and then suppposidly MOST of them went back to magrath area
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    FAI
    Posts
    2,294

    Default Cool

    Thanks Vince for doing the research. I know that bear that visited me would not have made it further if she had been bigger than 4'. It was amazing how far and fast they moved to get back home.

  8. #8
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default aint this nee-toe


    McGrath Experimental Field Work Concluded Department of Fish and Game biologists wrapped up efforts to move bears out of an Experimental Micro-Management Area (EMMA) surrounding McGrath on Saturday. Efforts now will concentrate on learning how many moose calves survive and on whether any of the displaced bears return to the EMMA this summer. These efforts are being done to help restore moose harvest opportunities near McGrath.
    Field work began May 11 to capture and relocate bears from the EMMA to state lands between 170 and 220 miles away. Before May, staff estimated that up to 45 bears might have to be relocated, but by Saturday staff handled 87 black bears and 9 grizzly bears, and had moved 90 animals.
    Originally scheduled to stop on June 5, the field work wound down a week earlier because staff believe nearly all of the bears in the area have been moved, the budget had been expended, and the state’s supply of capture drugs had run out.
    Bears were moved to locations southwest of Nenana, northeast of Minto, northwest of Tanana and south of Fairbanks.
    Whether or how much the field work will benefit local moose populations remains to be seen. “Removing bears could allow moose populations to increase, or could allow wolf populations to increase their take of moose,” Research Coordinator Patrick Valkenburg said. “We will learn more as staff continue to monitor the collared animals and complete moose surveys this fall.”
    Valkenburg praised the contributions of crew-members from the McGrath area, particularly trappers and charter pilots. “Trappers caught some key bears that would have been difficult or impossible to capture by helicopter,” Valkenburg stated. “And pilots shared information about bear locations and behavior that greatly helped the research effort.” Trappers caught 16 bears, including three grizzlies and 13 black bears.
    Twenty-two black bears and one grizzly were radiocollared before release. As of Saturday, most bears were dispersing away from the drop sites. Less than a quarter of the bears were heading toward McGrath, but by Saturday, the closest was still 70 miles from its capture point.
    Three of the collared black bears have been taken by hunters: one near Healy, one near Livengood and one near Rex. About two weeks had passed since their capture, so the bears were safe for human consumption when taken.
    The research budget for all of Unit 19D East including the calf mortality study, moose surveys, handling and collaring yearling moose, and the bear removal project, totaled $200,000. The bear removal portion of the budget totaled approximately $60,000.
    A side benefit of the research project is perhaps one of the most accurate estimates ever generated on the area’s black bear population size. Staff learned that the area supported one black bear per 3.5 square miles. Of the estimated 130 black bears present, 81 were removed. Many of the remaining bears are sows with cubs of the year, which usually are not important predators of moose calves.
    Staff also estimate that 15 grizzly bears inhabited the EMMA, of those 9 were removed. Two of the grizzly bears were very large by Interior standards, where a 500-pound bear in the spring is considered large. One boar weighed in at 610 pounds, and the last bear caught on Saturday tipped the scales at 700 pounds. Each of the bears are expected to gain at least 200 pounds during the summer.
    Staff will continue to monitor the collared bears and are also continuing the third calf mortality study conducted in the past three years. As of Monday, 55 calves were radiocollared hours after birth, and six of the collared calves had died. One calf died of starvation after its mother died due to birth complications, two calves were killed by a grizzly bear and one by a black bear. Two other calves have died, but the cause has not yet been determined. (Subsequently, the grizzly bear that took two of the marked calves and the black bear that took one of the collared calves were moved out of the EMMA.) In comparison, by June 2, 2002, 10 of 85 collared moose calves had been killed by bears.
    A crew of about 12 ADF&G staff members, contracted trappers, charter pilots and volunteers cooperated on the project.
    For more information go to http://www.state.ak.us/adfg and click on “Restoring the McGrath Moose Harvest” under News and Features.
    ###
    .........................................
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    101

    Default

    Just out of curiosity, can anyone explain why they shift bears from one area to another? I would have thought the bears would spread around by themselves anyway. Is it to prop up numbers for hunting season or to address a drop in numbers?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •