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Thread: Sleeping warm

  1. #1
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Sleeping warm

    What matters most when you need a warm night's sleep in the field?

    Regarding a warm night's sleep in cold weather, most discussions for focus on sleeping bags, pads, etc:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...d.php?p=607044
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...d.php?p=594554
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=49415

    Gear is important, but the big picture for some includes many factors, features and tips:
    1. Fit: Down or synthetic a sleeping bag has to fit you - and the positions/movement you favor while in it.
    2. Hood: that will snug down to a small hole around your mouth and nose
    3. Layered sleep systems: (Lujon once posted something on this, but I didn't find it) work just like layered clothing - adaptable to the conditions
    4. Layered sleep clothing
    5. Pad: that protects you from cold spots
    6. Sweat: Years ago in the scouts, we learned that a layer of moisture from the day's sweat can keep you from sleeping warm. Now, I don't understand this exactly, but it does seem I sleep warmer when I towel off (handi-wipes usually) before heading to the bag.
    7. Hydration - might help too. I think of the body as a water-heated, water-cooled system which depends on enough circulating medium to work well.

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default What makes a good winter's night sleep?

    #1- a good flat, groomed base with no bumps to plague you all night;
    #2- a very good and thick pad that you won't roll off of or is too short;
    #3- don't drink too much liquids in the evening, and empty your bladder well (even still keep a pee-pot close by);
    #4- sleeping clothing. I have dedicated long underware and warm socks rolled right up in my bag. A sleeping toque is good too;
    #5- the best bag you can get;
    #6- a nice little pillow;
    #7- your parka to throw over your bag should you start to get chilly in the middle of the night.
    #8- a flashlight handy in case of second part of #3

    These things get more important the older you get!

  3. #3
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    Sleep nekid.

    Flat ground. Good pad. Good bag. Never wear your clothes in the bag (tighty-whities excluded). Let the bag do what it is supposed to do. Clothing just restricts circulation and also makes you overheat, sweat, and then get cold.

    Even mid-winter camping with sub-zero outside. Go nekid. Put your inner set of polys or polarfleece that you'll wear the next morning down in the bottom of the bag. You can slip these on first thing before exiting the bag in the morning to get dressed.

    YMMV
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  4. #4
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    I stuff all sorts of things in the bag w/ me as well, w/ the wiggys badgs it dries your gear out and eliminates dead air in the bag. When I lay down I usually have my mont bell thermawrap (the pants too when I can afford them) I have my hunting pant in there, along w/ everything I am going to wear the next day cept my rain jacket. If it real coad I also toss a hot nalgene bottle down in the bottom wrapped in my light weight gloves. Unfortunately it does stretch the gloves a bit but it also dries them out and keeps my feet toasty all night long. The water is used for oat meal and a hot drink the next moring.
    I agree with the dedicated sleeping base layer. I wouldn't call it "dedicated" but I do similar. I take some mid weight merino wool long johns on all my late hunts or anything up in the alpine after mid august. It would be worn under my gear if we got really snowed on and I had to hike out.
    For the winter I like the Big Agnes IAC pads with something under them. All of my winter camping so far has been done from a sled where weight is not an issue so I also like to carry a thick military wool blanket that can be used as a carpet in your tent. I lay it down then put the pad on top of it which seems to work pretty well rather than trying to keep two regular sleeping pads together all night.

  5. #5
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Nekid you say!

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Sleep nekid.

    Flat ground. Good pad. Good bag. Never wear your clothes in the bag (tighty-whities excluded). Let the bag do what it is supposed to do. Clothing just restricts circulation and also makes you overheat, sweat, and then get cold.

    Even mid-winter camping with sub-zero outside. Go nekid. Put your inner set of polys or polarfleece that you'll wear the next morning down in the bottom of the bag. You can slip these on first thing before exiting the bag in the morning to get dressed.

    YMMV
    Oh man would I hate to get up in the middle of the night in that mode.

  6. #6
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    I carry two pads to place between my bag and the ground.

    My trick to stay warm is to boil water immediately before bed, pour it into my Nalgene bottle, wrap the bottle up in a hat or other piece of clothing, and put it in the bag with me. Because I'm short and my bag is longer, I stuff my clothes into the bottom of the bag and then I have warm clothes to slip into the next morning. If it's extremely cold I'll wear my heavy arctic grade balaclava to bed, light thermals, and socks. I also usually stuff my "Woobie" (the liner from a military poncho) in the bag with me as an extra blanket. It's the hot water bottle that really makes it warm and cozy though. And it guarantees unfrozen water for the morning too.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Sleep nekid.

    Flat ground. Good pad. Good bag. Never wear your clothes in the bag (tighty-whities excluded). Let the bag do what it is supposed to do. Clothing just restricts circulation and also makes you overheat, sweat, and then get cold.

    Even mid-winter camping with sub-zero outside. Go nekid. Put your inner set of polys or polarfleece that you'll wear the next morning down in the bottom of the bag. You can slip these on first thing before exiting the bag in the morning to get dressed.

    YMMV

    HAHAHA So I am not the only one who believes in this method whole heartdly. Naked is the best way to sleep!

  8. #8

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    Lotsa good knowledge here but at least one important thing is missing:

    Keep you breath outside the bag! Completely covering your head and breathing inside the bag introduces moisture and reduces the insulating properties of your bag, liner, bed clothes etc. Know how I know?
    It doesn't matter what you miss them with.

  9. #9
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Man, I wish Marc Taylor would chime in...that guy knows bunches about sleeping warm.

    Yes, I'm a Wiggy's fan. It hasn't let me down yet.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KClark View Post
    Lotsa good knowledge here...
    yep and the most important thing I am learning is who not to share a tent with! No way am I sharing a tent with nakid pee-pot guy!! Especially not a little spike tent!

  11. #11
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    yep and the most important thing I am learning is who not to share a tent with! No way am I sharing a tent with nakid pee-pot guy!! Especially not a little spike tent!
    Sometimes staying warm ends up with spooning
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  12. #12

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    A good warm meal 2 hours before climbing in for the night. Most of the energy used by your body is for temperature control.

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default You're mixing things up!

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    yep and the most important thing I am learning is who not to share a tent with! No way am I sharing a tent with nakid pee-pot guy!! Especially not a little spike tent!
    There's the nekid guy and then there's the pee-pot guy.

    This pee-pot guy is talking about a sealable container such as a coffee can w/lid.... or bad things could take place.
    If one needs to get up to use a pee-pot at below zero, they'd best not be nekid. Especially if your flow isn't as fast as it what it once was.

    Spike tents.... oh no! I snore badly enough that I hardly ever share a tent with anyone anymore, so even in a 1-man I have plenty of room.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    Sometimes staying warm ends up with spooning
    Whoa......
    Attached Images Attached Images
    It doesn't matter what you miss them with.

  15. #15
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    There's the nekid guy and then there's the pee-pot guy.
    Ah, you haven't lived until you've held that morning pee as long as humanly possible, then go diving out of the spike tent into 3 feet of snow in your skivies to get "relief". That wakes you up faster than coffee every time!

    Spooning is banned during winter camping cuz the ladies refuse to go unless there is a cabin with wood stove involved.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  16. #16
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Spooning is banned during winter camping cuz the ladies refuse to go unless there is a cabin with wood stove involved.
    My ole lady won't even fit in a sleeping bag anymore (7mo preg)
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  17. #17
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Spooning is banned during winter camping cuz the ladies refuse to go unless there is a cabin with wood stove involved.
    Unless you are Alaska_Lanche and polarisblake....

  18. #18
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default I'll...

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Ah, you haven't lived until you've held that morning pee as long as humanly possible, then go diving out of the spike tent into 3 feet of snow in your skivies to get "relief". That wakes you up faster than coffee every time!
    ... stick to coffee. A plunge in the snow might stop my heart.

    I've been known to make coffee while laying in my bag.

  19. #19
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Flat ground. Good pad. Good bag. Never wear your clothes in the bag (tighty-whities excluded). Let the bag do what it is supposed to do. Clothing just restricts circulation and also makes you overheat, sweat, and then get cold.
    I have been trying to convince my wife of this for years. No, not for other purposes ...just to keep her warm. She's notoriously cold in her sleeping bag, yet she always wears a ton of clothes when sleeping in a tent. Glad to see someone else here understands the principles behind sleeping bags keeping you warm.

  20. #20
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Thinking that may vary from person to person

    I sleep much warmer in my Duo-therm long johns than w/o them. They're not really very constricting. Reflects my body heat and keeps me toasty.

    But then you nekid guys... cary on. You're just free spirits.

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