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Thread: Connector Rods

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default Connector Rods

    So I have watched Hunt_AK's glock animation post quite a few times over the last two weeks. My ? is what does the connector rod do and how do they get their rating of #'s. For example I bought a Lone Wolf 3.5# connector rod. The stock glock one is also 3.5#, I thought it might have been more. This new has a 25% reduction in side thickness plus it is polished, thus it says giving a lighter crisper trigger pull. How exactly does it do that?
    Just trying understand all this "lingo" and really understand how this pistol works. Thanks for any insight!

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    The connector rod is a stamped out piece of sheet steel that is hooked to the trigger and goes back to the firing pin. When you pull the trigger,the connector pushes back on the firing pin to finish cocking it. After is gets back to a certain point it slides out of the groove on the firing pin and releases it to go forward and fire the gun. The connectors are usually rough from the factory and polishing them properly can make them release much smoother. I'm not sure how they change the # of pull but I assume by changing the firing pin spring. I have polished a couple of the stock connectors and they do work smoother making a much nicer trigger.

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Thanks man. In the animation I the connector it shows doesn't look the same as the connector rod. I think it shows the connector rod as part of the trigger assembly. Yes the new one is polished. Yes to get a lighter trigger pull, you have to put in a stronger spring, stock is 5# and looks like guys buy up the 6#. Somewhere I thought I saw a 12#, that would be scary light though.

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    Ah, lets see here. The "connector" in a Glock is not connected to the trigger. That would be the trigger bar. The weight of trigger pull is altered at two points. The first is the "connector", which is the small piece of steel that sticks up at an angle at the right rear of the frame with the slide removed. By using a different connector with a different engagement angle, shallower, the pull can be lightened. These connectors are typically marked with a"-" mark to distinguish them from the standard, 5lb unmarked connectors. Also you can increase the pull with a "new york" trigger spring in conjunction with a standard, unmarked connector. Conventional wisdom says don't go hacking on your trigger bar. Been to Glock armorers school 4 times, every 3 years to keep certification.

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    Ah, lets see here. The "connector" in a Glock is not connected to the trigger. That would be the trigger bar. The weight of trigger pull is altered at two points. The first is the "connector", which is the small piece of steel that sticks up at an angle at the right rear of the frame with the slide removed. By using a different connector with a different engagement angle, shallower, the pull can be lightened. These connectors are typically marked with a"-" mark to distinguish them from the standard, 5lb unmarked connectors. Also you can increase the pull with a "new york" trigger spring in conjunction with a standard, unmarked connector. Conventional wisdom says don't go hacking on your trigger bar. Been to Glock armorers school 4 times, every 3 years to keep certification.

    It all makes sense. But the connector in the animation looks nothing like the connector rod, to me anyways. The trigger bar looked more like the connector rod, so I assumed it was two different connector pieces. Like I said I just trying to learn and make sure I know what is going on. Thanks man for the clarifying and confirming the animation parts. I will tear into the G20 soon enough and see for myself. I would never go cutting anything in a firearm!!

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