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Thread: best method to pack out a moose

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    Default best method to pack out a moose

    my friend has go the idea stuck in my head to pack in a few miles and camp out for a week while we hunt moose. the only thing we havent figured out is if we shoot a moose and we walked in how we would get it out. any ideas?

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    invite more friends
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradbow84 View Post
    my friend has go the idea stuck in my head to pack in a few miles and camp out for a week while we hunt moose. the only thing we havent figured out is if we shoot a moose and we walked in how we would get it out. any ideas?
    I have a cupla GI Packboards, that I'll sell for a reasonable price.

    And, maybe I'll toss in some parachute cord.

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  4. #4

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    One step at a time works pretty good. I have packed them as far as 7 miles maybe 8 miles, boned out, in a kelty pack. Took some out of the very back of Peters Creek, beyond Bellicose Mt. It takes about six trips, including camp. When your done, you are clear about where you stand in relation to being a man.

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    I have packed out the last 2 moose i have taken out of the Koyokuk they were almost a mile in the timber and brush. Most hunt on the river and condim those that don't but you step into a new world when you take a moose a mile or more from the river.
    You really need a couple of good friends when you do this or they will not be your friends when its over. When you add you camp to this i would camp really really light so you can make one trip out with the camp and the other six with meat. Course we could not use 4 wheelers on any of this that would make a big differance.

    One of the biggest keys to meat packing is as soon as you start quarting meat get it hung and let hang for a few days to drop weight and start to dry a bit.

    good luck on finding good friends.

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  6. #6

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    thanks for the info we have talked about it and the fact that we would have to make multiple trips to pack out a single moose and he was trying to think of another way.
    i suggested the raft or canoe but he seems against that.
    and as per the good friend my friend is the only 1 ive met to even go along with the idea that we will be hiking in and packing out a moose
    thanks again

  7. #7
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Hike in Moose hunt

    You'd probably not want to do it.

    3 years ago I hiked into an area that was "Walk in Only Area" (No Plane, Motorized vehicle nor Pack animal was allowed) and had to hike about 8 or 9 miles just to get to a bowl where I saw quite a few moose and several large bulls what I estimated exceeding 50" or better...well long story short, theres a reason why they get so big there...no one is willing to tempt that feat....of course I was not hunting moose either,, just spotted them while I was in the field.

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    Well, I think you should do it at least ONCE......... Git it outta your system.

    A moose is a big start~~LOL!!~~

    Remeber, one piece at a time, and comfortable loads at that. Plan for your pack out and do it in steps.

    Get a nice walking stick to help you pack out. Dont get a strain by stooping or sitting/getting up, just rest standing by leaning on the stick.
    when I have to pack out across Tundra, I carry a walking stick. Its actually a very lightly carved spruce thats been peeled, winter dried, has a rod protruding about 4 inches that is set with a 2 inch copper pipe abpout 2 inches long. Its a harpoon shaft for Beavers, Otters and such, a rifle rest after a long run across tundra, a tent pole and a fishing rod .....if Im not using it to lean against for a rest while packing heavy loads across tundra. Someimes I cut the head off a caribou, slit the for legs and pass the shaft through the forlegs and two of us can lift and drag a Caribou long distances across tundra as well.....and I also use the steel tip to jab and test ice. If it gos through , I dont walk on it, or to see how deep snow is....
    A great tool to assist those who carry heavy loads far. My wife tossed mine somewhere ???? Oh well, a good reason to make a new one.

    Anyway, "walk-in" wil be "pack-out".

    Go for it!!!
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  9. #9

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    I didnt see anyone mention one of those plastic sleds? If the ground is a little wet, it would help out a lot. I do have to admit it is a pretty rough job to pack an animal out. The last moose i got wasnt very far from where we could put the meat on 4 wheelers, but it was still a chore because of the swampy marsh/tundra we had to walk over.

  10. #10

    Default on the topic...

    I'm headed into ship creek for one last shot at a bull this a.m. I have a crew ready for pack-out, provided the hunt goes well on Sat., but would like to add more names to a "reserve" list. tradbow84, this would a good way to figure just how far you want to pack in without investing a week, one trip in, one day. I'll only shoot on Sat., leaving all Sunday for footwork. Any interested crazy folks like myself, please p.m. phone #'s, and maybe there'll be a call Sun. morn.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    thats a trip you will never forget. when i leave them on the bone i make 9-11 trips on an average moose. depending on pack weight. and Terran. this time of year if you walk in and hang one you have all the time you need to get it out.. fall hunts can be tricky getting the meat salvaged before it spoils, and that is by far the most practical reason for the one mile rule that on average you will do 25-30 miles of hiking before your done. and at 70+ degrees .. meat care is a tough issue
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Default Pick the right spot

    Know where you're hunting...some spots it has to stay on the bone, it's still doable, but the suck factor increases. Also, it always seems easier packing your own meat out (remember that when your buddy starts complaining during the 3rd trip out with 60-80 lbs on his back - make sure he knows there's some reward for his labor).

    salcha star road

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    Default Indoctrinate early

    My first packing experience came when I was 9 years old. It was the antlers off a large bull. I can remember hating it like it was yesterday, I fell, cried, whined and whimpered but my dad simply looked at me and said 'those aren't getting to the plane any other way, so you better suck it up'. He knew I could handle it and I eventually did. To this day packing is one of my favorite things to do. Don't get me wrong, it often hurts and seems like torture, but as AGL4now said, it is the ultimate in man vs. nature. Once you do it, and survive, it can be addicting. I hadn't packed a moose in a couple of years until this year, although I have taken a few sheep and goats over that time, which is clearly a different type of packing, and I had forgot how damm heavy a hindquarter of a large (64") bull was. The pack was only about 3/4 of a mile, but it is in an area that requires meat to be left on the bone, so on the Barney's frame it went, final weigh in of the quarter was 172 lbs.

    So, if you want to do it and plan the logistics carefully, go for it. But know what you're in for. I would start by loading a pack frame with 150 pounds or so, walking around in the woods until you fall several times, twist a knee or ankle, utter countless profanities, and when you start looking ahead to the next log or bench as a 'rest' stop, you are probably ready. Oh, and be prepared, the first time you walk up to a large bodied bull the size of him will blow your mind!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sockeye1 View Post
    I would start by loading a pack frame with 150 pounds or so, walking around in the woods until you fall several times, twist a knee or ankle, utter countless profanities, and when you start looking ahead to the next log or bench as a 'rest' stop, you are probably ready. Oh, and be prepared, the first time you walk up to a large bodied bull the size of him will blow your mind!!!
    Don't forget to put the waders on and wallow around in the much with that load as well!

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    Practice, practice, practice.

    Yes Iím not kidding. You can get all the advice you want, until you put a 80# pack on your back and walk to the area you want to hunt, you will not know if you can do it, or if you really want to do it.

    One thing I learn a long time ago, was to pack the animal, Ĺ way out, and go back for more meat. This way you reduce your distance in haft and there less chance of a bears eating your meat.

    What I would recommend you do is hunt off an atv trail, most people drive buy good moose areas. When you get a moose, Iím sure an ATVíer will help you bring out the moose

  16. #16

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    I think you have got a lot of good advice so far. A moose is a BIG animal. It is not like a deer or caribou. Once you squeeze that trigger, you can't go back. You MUST salvage all that meat and pack it out. I would do some soul searching and decide if you really want to take this on. If you do, I am sure you will discover a lot about yourself and your friend(s).

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    Depending on size, you are looking at the likelihood of packing out 500lbs of meat (boned out). Depending on terrain, a pull-sled could be a great help or a frustrating pain in the rear. The cheap ones will break up fast on rough ground or hauling over sticks and logs, they hang up, fall over into tussock holes etc. A stretcher-type carrier, or even a pole, with two people works well on even ground, but can really be a pain on rough uneven tundra and in thicker brush and timber. One person slips, the entire load is then on you...easy to hurt yourself that way.

    So...what often is the way to go is to just bone out the meat and bag it in heavy duty garbage bags when in the pack, mark a good route and follow it each time, carry what you can, typically 80-100lb loads, hang it in game bags at the dropoff point and keep at it. If you want the antlers, or must pack them out to prove legality, that is another load in and of itself.

    It certainly can be done. I used to figure about one mph packing over tundra like in the pic below.

    The main thing is to get the meat out out asap so it doesn't spoil. Your biggest issue with something like what you're talking about is going to be proper meat care. There are ways you can prevent meat spoilage depending on terrain features. For example, putting meat in plastic garbage sacks is typically a no-no, but if you have boned out meat you can really keep it good and cool if you put it in plastic bags and dig down to permafrost, set it down on top of the ice, cover with moss, or set it in cold water (bag must be sealed, don't put it all the way under the water). Have done this in the past and it is incredible how cold you can get meat down to, especially the permafrost method. And this can extend the time meat will stay good til you get it all back to where you can deal with it.

    Also, what Sockeye said in his 2nd paragraph would be a good thing to understand, as far as what things are gonna be like, feel like. Note also I'm wearing a headnet in the picture, also expect some of the worst gnats you may ever experience <grin>.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    hands down the BEST method is on someone elses back...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    For deer a plastic bucket and pole. For moose two buckets on a pole like the coolies carry and repeat untill done.

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    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...052&id=0005601

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...0005568226079a

    I've never used this on a moose as I don't stray far from the wheeler, but have dragged alot of white tail on one similar to this growing up as a kid in Maine. We also made a two man one with a single bicycle wheel in the center, kinda like a stretcher with a center wheel that worked great. Terrain was normally very hilly, blowdowns, swamp and creek crossings. It looked like an 8 foot ladder made with aluminum 1" square tubing, with a 26" fat tire bicycle wheel (old school) in the center. It was perfect height for both users reducing strain on the back and easy to take breaks as you just kept it balanced. Just a suggestion

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