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Thread: I need some help

  1. #1
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    Default I need some help

    helllo there.
    I'm a rookie in snowshoeing and I need an advice about models and sizes of snow shoes. I want to get myself a decent pair (perhaps several - for some friends of mine).
    I mostly travel on rather wet snow about 50-80 cm deep and on slopes angled 20 to 30 deg. also, I want it really durable.
    I want to get all around model - would 25 inch cover me?
    in terms of strentgh - should I go for an msr denali's (or similar) or somthing with alu frame?

    thanks in advance
    lior

  2. #2
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by liorhort View Post
    helllo there.
    I'm a rookie in snowshoeing and I need an advice about models and sizes of snow shoes. I want to get myself a decent pair (perhaps several - for some friends of mine).
    I mostly travel on rather wet snow about 50-80 cm deep and on slopes angled 20 to 30 deg. also, I want it really durable.
    I want to get all around model - would 25 inch cover me?
    in terms of strentgh - should I go for an msr denali's (or similar) or somthing with alu frame?

    thanks in advance
    lior
    Depends on your weight and the maker of the shoe. All of the snowshoe makers have weight tables that you should be able to use. Just remember to factor in some weight for your pack! My siblings got me a size too small several years ago because they went with what my weight was on a good day .

    btw: 25" seems small unless you only weigh 140 (65 kilos).

    -Gr
    My signature is awesome.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I'm 6'0" and 175lbs, and I like 30" snowshoes for day-to-day use and 36" shoes for deep snow, light snow, or when carrying weight on my back.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    This is an interesting topic and one that I am interested in as well. I have a set of 36" Atlas shoes and I find that they want to dive in deep snow. I think there is just not enough shoe in front of my toe to give me the flotation I need. Is there anything out there that would work better? It almost seems that most of the shoes out there now are for walking on a trail not true backcountry use. At this point I am leaning toward getting backcountry ski's and forgetting about the snowshoe deal all together.

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    If the snow conditions will not support my weight, I would not blame the snowshoes. I would use bigger snowshoes. They do make 56 x 14 or larger snowshoes or stay on a pack trail.

  6. #6
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    This is an interesting topic and one that I am interested in as well. I have a set of 36" Atlas shoes and I find that they want to dive in deep snow. I think there is just not enough shoe in front of my toe to give me the flotation I need. Is there anything out there that would work better? It almost seems that most of the shoes out there now are for walking on a trail not true backcountry use. At this point I am leaning toward getting backcountry ski's and forgetting about the snowshoe deal all together.
    I hear ya, but I'm not sure what to tell ya. When the snow is deep and fluffy, I sink in with my snow shoes as well. You could get humongous snowshoes to the point where you're wearing surf boards on your feet, but that would be just as much work as sinking in. I think you still go with the shoes you have. The advantage is that when there is any kind of crust or when you have late-season corn snow, you stay right on top. Plus, it only takes one person to tamp down the fluffy snow. If you are traveling with friends, take turns at the lead. Once one snowshoer has made a bit of a trail, those following have a much easier trail. Everyone wins on the return trip, unless you're doing a loop, of course.

    My back country skis sink into the fluffy snow too, and they can be a lot harder to manage in those conditions than snowshoes, since you can always pick a snowshoe right up out of the snow. If your ski tip is being stubborn about getting itself buried on every step, it can be a lot of fun .

    -Gr
    My signature is awesome.

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