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Thread: Penetration Test - 210gr Partition 2936fps

  1. #1

    Default Penetration Test - 210gr Partition 2936fps

    I did a penetration test with the 210gr Partition out of my 338Win Mag moving at 2936fps.

    Frist I used 9 hard plastic gallon jugs as the test media. I fired from 10yds away. Here are the 9 jugs measuring in length 49.5 inches or 4.125 feet deep.




    [b]
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  2. #2

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    Second here is the impact effect of the 210gr Partition and note it traveled to the back side of the seventh jug and punched a hole but did not have enough energy and momentum to exit the seventh jug. Also look at the front jug way off to the right and the 9th jug was knocked back and off the table from the impact. The 210gr Partition traveled 38.5 inches or 3.208 feet through the media.[/b]





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  3. #3

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    Here is the 210gr Partition recovered from the seventh jug with the front part of the partition gone and the back like it is suppose to be. The back remaining part to the partition weighed 148.4grs.






    I do not think there is any doubt about the 210gr Partition killing anything it hits up close or far off when traveling over 2900fps.
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  4. #4

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    That is really cool BT! Wouldn't want to be hit by that

    I'll have to try that with my 300 RUM and a 180 E-Tip @ 3400 fps

  5. #5
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    Very impressive indeed. Thats a good idea to use plastic jugs as test medium. I've wanted to test Hornady's I shoot, thanks for the info.!

  6. #6

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    More pictures of the remain back part of the 210gr Partition





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  7. #7
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    Thumbs up

    - looks like you are having fun -

    What are you 'testing'?

    Any other shots fired using the exact same elements of the experiment?

    What other projectiles and velocities do you have lined up for comparison?

    I sure like those Partitions... they've never let me down demonstrating downrange accuracy on paper and performance on game. All time favorites would be .30-06 180gr and .375 H&H 300gr.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Richardson View Post
    - looks like you are having fun -

    What are you 'testing'?

    Any other shots fired using the exact same elements of the experiment?

    What other projectiles and velocities do you have lined up for comparison?

    I sure like those Partitions... they've never let me down demonstrating downrange accuracy on paper and performance on game. All time favorites would be .30-06 180gr and .375 H&H 300gr.
    So far I have not tested any of the other bullets in this cartridge but plan on doing so. Saving up some more of those jugs now and when I have enough I will try another make of bullet at over 2900fps out of the 338Win Mag.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    I've got "the" relationship with the .33 calibers and have for many many yrs., like both the win mags and the A-sq. version. For many of the past yrs I took to the 210 Partitions/Win mag but of late stick with the 250 grainers. Getting older type thing and "just" wanting a heavier than thou' bullet.

    Them bullets hold up like they aught to .... good job on the "range" report!! Maybe you could for "grins" see what the 250's would do...now that "will" be the penetrator.

    cool to see what interests us in any type of "bullet" media.....thankx

    best regards

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    Default and then the 358 Winchester...

    Beartooth,

    I was thinking you should use the next few jugs to test your 358 with a Partition.., you know the ol' "slower is deeper" concept...

    Thanks man for the pics...very cool.

    Build yourself a "channel" to put those jugs in, with 2x6's on the bottom, sides, and end so they can't blow outa' there.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by 358wsm View Post
    Beartooth,

    I was thinking you should use the next few jugs to test your 358 with a Partition.., you know the ol' "slower is deeper" concept...

    Thanks man for the pics...very cool.

    Build yourself a "channel" to put those jugs in, with 2x6's on the bottom, sides, and end so they can't blow outa' there.
    Ditto on the .358 test. Great post Beartooth. By the way, what kind of recoil difference have you noticed between the .338 and the .358 in your other thread. I assume the guns are similar in weight.?? I have an old shoulder injury that "long in the tooth" is working on these days.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragtop View Post
    Ditto on the .358 test. Great post Beartooth. By the way, what kind of recoil difference have you noticed between the .338 and the .358 in your other thread. I assume the guns are similar in weight.?? I have an old shoulder injury that "long in the tooth" is working on these days.
    The recoil of the 338Win Mag is much more significant than the recoil with the 358Win. The 338Win Mag has a recoil that is faster, and more of a straight back recoil compared to the 358Win. The 358Win is a cup cake to shoot. Now that said, neither of these cartridges give me problem shooting and maintaining good groups.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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  13. #13

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    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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    You certainly get involved with each rifle and cartridge you test. Have you decided on one that stands above the rest that you've wrung out over the past few years? I think the .257 W you built was impressive, but the .375 W is too. And it is much more sexy than a .338 Winnie.
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  15. #15

    Default interesting

    What I find more interesting about this high velocity impact test isn't the fact that a Nosler Partition worked as designed; But at that velocity and range the base didn't loose any petals. Since the nose hasn't been pictured I assume it was either lost or vaporized during the test. Either way the remaining base weighed in at nearly 150 grns. , that's the original weight of a lot of 30 caliber bullets get launched at. Much less after 3 or so feet of high velocity impact.
    Guess that's why I've never had a failure with one, Huh !
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  16. #16

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    I have decided to take this test thing to another level. The penetrations tests like the one posted here are not very valuable, as an indication of what a bullet will do on animals, but they are fun to do anyway.

    What would show a better indication is if the jugs had been closed in between two one by six and fronted with about 8 inches of wet news print. Then a piece of 3/8ths inch plywood soaked for a few days before the test, then about three jugs, aniother piece of the 3/8ths plywood, then 8 inches of wet news print on the other end of the column.

    This would have more closely duplicated a broadside elk or moose, or with more added - a length wise shot on a big elk.

    I will try this after hunting season this year giving me some special to do and then really put the 210gr to a test moving the distance out to 25yds.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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  17. #17

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    The following is part of an article by Mac who knows what he is talking about and has done more hunting than I have and it gave me the idea for my next test, I think his comments say a lot and explains a great deal. I have only used the Partition on hogs, deer, elk and black bear.

    My experience with both types of bullets, (bonded and none bonded partitions) on very large mean animals that require some killing to stop.

    This may not mean anything to an elk or deer hunter, but I think it may shed some light on the subject. The two partition type bullets most commonly used on heavy animals are the Nosler Partition (Unbonded), and the Swift A-frame (Bonded). For this comparison we will take cape Buffalo, which have a hide and bone that can do some real damage to a bullet. and require a lot of penetration to get to the vitals, and beyond.

    The only one shot kills I have ever experienced on Cape Buffalo have been with a 300 gr Nosler Partitions from a 375 H&H, while all others required at least three shots regardless of bullet type, or caliber. The Swift A-frames are used a lot by client hunters on Buffalo in Africa, but are not well liked by most PHs there. The fact that they are bonded makes them form a mushroom type expansion, that is very smooth, and does far less tissue damage along the wound channel, than the same weight Nosler Partition, which framents the front part of the bullet, spreying shrapnell throug the lungs, and heart even if it misses the heart by a little. The penetration of the bonded A-frame may be a bit more than the Partition, but I haven't seen it if it is.

    I shot a Cape Buffalo bull just where the neck meets the shoulder and low in line with the heart/lung area, and aimed at the off side hind leg. The Partition entered about 10" above the brisket, ripped the top of the heart to shreds, and part of the front of the right lung, and totally destroying the left lung. rangeing into the paunch, filled tight with grass, and ended up just under the skin in front of the left hind leg. Killing the buffalo in 30 feet where he went down on his nose. The bullet is in front of me as I type this, and it lost most of the front half of the bullet, but the back took it all the way to his hind leg, about 4 1/2 feet of penetration, and the damage was extensive.

    I think the bonded core bullets are fine on deer elk, and moose, but on the big "bite backs" make mine a Nosler partition if it is available in the caliber I'm shooting.

    The penetrations tests like the one posted here are not very valuable, as an indication of what a bullet will do on animals, but they are fun to do anyway. That would show a better indication if the jugs had been closed in between two one by six and fronted with about 8 inches of wet news print, then a piece of 3/8ths inch plywood soaked for a few days before the test, then aboth three jugs, aniother piece of the 3/8th s plywood, then 8 inches of wet news print on the other end of the column. This would have more closely duplicated a broadside elk or moose, or with more added a length wise shot on a big elk.

    I like to see the results of this done a little differently, though nothing will actually duplicate an elk but an elk!
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    . . . I think the bonded core bullets are fine on deer elk, and moose, but on the big "bite backs" make mine a Nosler partition if it is available in the caliber I'm shooting.
    I've got exactly the same sentiments and IME he is dead on. One reason that A-Frames are/have been so popular is their availability in calibers over .338. For a long while Partitions stopped at the 33s.

    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    I like to see the results of this done a little differently, though nothing will actually duplicate an elk but an elk!
    I like bullet tests for comparisons and such, but the proof of a bullet is in its performance in living tissue.

    Thanks for posting this here BT.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    I like bullet tests for comparisons and such, but the proof of a bullet is in its performance in living tissue.

    Thanks for posting this here BT.
    Plus one on that...

    But... All the pics of TSX's and E-Tips recovered from game that I have seen look just like the adds and ones shot through gelatin and jugs and phone books.

    All this talk about bullet performce is great stuff. I love it. For most of the game we hunt, bullet type doesn't matter a whole lot, as long as the bullet expands and causes destructive tissue damage. Whether it's an explosive Berger or a tough monometal E-Tip, as long as the bullet is put in to a vital area and expands, the animal will be killed fairly quickly.

    Now for the real big tough critters, which I have never hunted, but if I ever do, I do not want a frangible bullet. I want a monometal or solid. For african lion give me a 300 g GS HV shot from a 375 Ultra @ 2800-2900 fps. One dead cat. For a Cape Buffalo which reqires more penetration. give me a 400 g Nosler solid or a 410 g GS FN fired from a 416 Rigby @ 2500 fps. The solids are designed to penetrate thick hide and heavy bone without deflecting or loosing mass for deep straight line penetration. Their blunt expanded flat frontal area causes much damage on the way through.

    But hey, that's just me

    Good thread...

    Mark

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    Default "..spreying shrapnell..."

    Mac said this about bullet performance, and except for one other person who I once heard speak of it, I haven't heart too much about this concept , but I believe it is a very real part of "bullet performance."

    Yes, the Partition does loose some of it's core weight.., But, where does "That" weight go..?

    I crank up 100 grain Partitions out of my 25-06 Ackley...Because I believe that on thin skinned game it gives the best of both worlds.
    The "core" of the bullet acts like a "monometal" penatrator, while the "spreying sharapnell" works like a shotgun...
    I have usually gotten 2 exit holes with these in my 25-06 Ackley...
    can't say what is causing the "other exit hole...
    But I can say that the Partition in that rifle is like shooting a "Big Game Varmint Load..!"

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