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Thread: Need a little help guys...

  1. #1
    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Default Need a little help guys...

    Ok Guys,

    Need a little help please. Just purchased a used 50cal Knight Original DISC. Got the gun home and found that there was a bullet in the barrel with more then likley gun powder behind it. Now I have shot guns since I was a little kid and always wanted to get into this side of guns. But being a rookie at this I don't even have the foggiest idea on how to take it apart. Hind site I should have bought a new gun but I didn't. So I'm stuck with what I bought. So my question is, is there a gun shop in Anchorage that could show me how to take it apart, clean, and put it back together. Oh and get the bullet out. I will also need to purchase powder, bullets, and everything else for this shooting and hunting with this gun. Or any members on here that would be willing show a rookie muzzle loader the ropes on how to disassemble this thing, get the bullet out, properly clean it and put it back together. And allow me to pick your brain on muzzleloaders and shooting them.

    Thanks,
    Chris

  2. #2

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    There are two courses of action you can do yourself. One is to get a CO2 discharger that has an appropriate nozzle end for about $15 and use that to blow out the charge. Really slick and easy, and a tool you should have anyway for days when you want to unload without firing and cleaning.

    The second alternative is to simply remove the breech plug pour out the powder and use the ramrod to push the bullet on out. Not a problem UNLESS..... Unless the gun was sold to you without the tool for removing the breech plug. I'm not familiar enough with the breech plug details on the Disc model to suggest alternatives to the tool. Virtually any gunsmith can do the work without the tool I bet, but if you have the tool there's no need for the smith.

    If you decide to try shooting it out, before doing so use your ramrod to push down on the bullet to make sure it's fully seated against the charge. That's assuming that the previous owner didn't put a dangerous overcharge in there. No way to know for sure, but I would have to doubt it. That still leaves you with the breech plug problem, because you need to remove the breech plug anyway to clean it properly.

    I just checked, and though they're not selling rifles any more, Knight is still in business selling parts and equipment to support their rifles. You can download a user manual for your Disc Extreme here, and that will tell you everything you need to know about disassembling and caring for your rifle. I'm sure they'll also sell you a wrench if you need it. While you're there I'd buy some spare discs, just in case they become hard to get. I don't have any experience with your rifle, but hear really good things about it from happy owners. I'm betting you'll find happiness starting at that link.

    Welcome to the world of muzzleloaders. You should find lots of help from other enthusiasts.

  3. #3
    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks, BrownBear

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Before the slick CO2 things we use to use a ram rod with a cork screw type attachment, provided the bullet is a round ball made of lead you can pull it out, done it lots of times.

  5. #5
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Cork Screw

    Quote Originally Posted by AKFishOn View Post
    Before the slick CO2 things we use to use a ram rod with a cork screw type attachment, provided the bullet is a round ball made of lead you can pull it out, done it lots of times.
    I agree with FishOn. Sportsmans WHSE has the attachment. I think it is less than 10 bucks. The bullet does not even have to be round or lead. I used it to pull a Barnes Sabot round out of my pro hunter and it worked fine.

  6. #6

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    One small word of caution, but not a reason to avoid the fitting. If you ever "dry ball" in the heat of the moment- seat a bullet with no powder under it- be aware that you might have trouble getting enough grip on the short stub of ramrod with wet hands or gloves in order to pull the bullet. Been there, done that. If you're going to carry one of these into the field rather than a CO2 discharger, add a ramrod puller to your kit. You'll be glad you did! They're light and relatively cheap, plus they fold up small and fit into your kit.

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    Default Caution if you have a wooden ramrod

    Be careful pulling a bullet out with a wooden ramrod and corkscrew. I had the wooden ramrod on my T/C Renegade break while twisting the rod and corkscrew into the bullet. Then I had to visit the gun smith since I didn't have a breach wrench.

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    Default bullet in barrel

    they make a bullet extractor that is simply a screw at the end of as shaft run down the barrel and is run directly into the end of the bullet and then you gently pull it out . this is a common problem sence the invention of the gun .A good steel fine threaded sheet metal screw brazed to a long shaft would do the trick . and I would keep it handy when your out and about with the gun just like a cleaning rod .
    I used mine a lot when I first started learning about black powder.

  9. #9
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    I was always told not to leave a charge in my muzzleloader for more than a day, one for safety, also because the powder is corrosive and will eat away at the barrel over a period of time. There is no tellin how long that powder has been in the barrel so it might be worthwhile to have a gunsmith check it out.

  10. #10
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    I was just going to post the same as the above. If the powder charge is real black powder and it's been in there for awhile, the barrel may be ruined. The black powder can eat away at the steel and weaken the breech area to the point where it will come apart violently if you shoot it.

    After you pull the bullet (a screw welded to the end of a metal rod is the best method), look carefully at the powder charge to see if it is BP or a substitute.

    Modern smokeless BP substitutes are not nearly as bad. But you should never leave these guns loaded.

    Never, never try to shoot out a stuck bullet or one that was loaded by someone else like you have in this case.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  11. #11
    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    can you guys recomend a gunsmith that could look at it?

  12. #12

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    Not sure about the gunsmith, but I can put your mind at ease on the powder corrosion issue. It's the residue AFTER firing that's corrosive and not the unfired powder. In fact, even if it did corrode the rifling down where the powder was, the bullet is never going to see that anyway, because it always sits on top of the powder. Either way, no sweat. When you pull the breech plug and clean it, you can look right down the bore and confirm the condition of the rifling below where the bullet has been sitting. If it was my gun, I wouldn't be worried about it.

  13. #13
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    BB, the BP charge certainly can corrode the inside of the barrel. It's well documented with antique arms, especially those which hung on the wall loaded and ready to go for many years. And it has nothing to do with the bullet going into the weak spot. The steel is weakened due to the acidic action of the BP sitting there for long periods of time. If the gun had been fired and reloaded without being cleaned, that makes the problem exponentially worse.

    As this case is a modern muzzleloader, it most likely hasn't been alive long enough to have such damage caused by leaving it loaded. And there's also a good chance the charge is Pyrodex, so that won't hurt the barrel at all.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  14. #14

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    That's a common fallacy about black powder. I've got a partial can of it dated 1971. The can has been half full for most of its 38 years, but the inside is still shiny bright even though the outside is rusty.

    I've also used my CO2 discharger to help a friend blow out a charge from his TC 50 cal Hawken that he can document has been sitting in the bore since 1978 when he last put it away. Using a bore scope, we found a few small rust spots up near the muzzle and general discoloration here and there all the way down to the ball. The bore was shiny bright below the ball where moist air never got to it. It shoots like a house afire.

    And even if somehow the bore was ruined below a ball, no sweat. I've got a couple that weren't cleaned right somewhere in their earlier lifes, and there is absolutely no rifling left in the lower 4 or 5 inches of the bore. Yet they shoot remarkably well because the remainder of the rifling is in decent shape.

    Download the manual from Knight.

    Locate a breech plug wrench and follow the directions to remove the rifle and pull the breech plug.

    Use your ramrod to push the bullet and charge out the rear.

    Clean normallly.

    Reassemble.

    Enjoy that new rifle.

  15. #15
    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks guys. Really apreciate all the help on this one. Been in medical training for the past couple days then have to head back to work. I will let every one know the out come when I get it out (corrosion or no corrosion). Again thanks every one who chimed in. I know I will have more questions to come.

    Chris

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    Default MZ help.

    I would avoid putting anything down the barrel that is not designed to be put down there. ie no ferrious metal. It can cause sparks and that is the last thing you need when you have powder in the barrel. The co2 dischargers work extremely well and have fittings to fit any action or ignition source. Another option is to take the barrel assembly and remove it from the stock as well as the trigger and place the breech end in a bucket of water for an hour or so to render the charge inert. Then you are fine to go ahead and remove the breech plug and push the load out the breech end with minimal concern of it going boom when it aint supposed to.
    It sounds like your new to this great sport and I would reccomend taking the ADFG MZ certification course. It is designed to get you in at the ground floor and give you all the necessary information and hands on experience to get you out shooting (not to mention your certification). You will unfortunately have to wait till spring for the next available classes but they should be just what your needing.
    Good luck and be safe.

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    Default Need a little help guys

    just spoke to a bow tech. at bass pro shop and he said to move my sights over a bit till on target, now im fixin to go outback and try some more thanks for looking and any help, would a forearm guard come in handy????

  18. #18

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    I think you have mistakenly posted in the wrong section Hannah. This one is all about muzzleloaders, and you're question is all about archery. Try it again in the archery section, and I'm sure you'll get lots of help.

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