Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Moose burger question

  1. #1
    Member wykee5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sodak
    Posts
    208

    Default Moose burger question

    I noticed on the moose burger processing post that there are different opinions on moose burger. I just got my first moose, and am planning on doing all the processing myself. My main question is;
    Do most of you add beef fat, or leave it just as is?
    When I have done deer, I trim all the deer fat off and add beef fat, because deer fat tends to stick to stick to the roof of your mouth. Is moose fat like this, or is it more like beef fat which stays liquid in your mouth?
    Any thoughts and opinions are appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,956

    Default

    There doesn't seem to be much fat marbled into moose meat. Once the meat is trimmed of "surface" fat, its pretty lean. I have had beef fat put in so the hamburger sticks together and is juicy instead of having a dried out hockey puck for a burger. But that's just me.

  3. #3
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Your going to get a lot of different opinions on this one.

    Some will say why add beef fat to lean healthy moose meat and those are some good points.

    It comes down to what you like.

    I like to add no more than 10% to my burger. It holds together good and you don't have to drain the pan when browned, but that's just me.

    Good luck, I hope you find what you like.

  4. #4

    Default

    Personally, I have never added any kind of fat to game meat. I trim off the surface fat and grind it as-is. I prefer to eat game meat when I eat game meat, not game meat mixed with some other processed fat product or something handled by who knows who before I ever saw it. Never had any problem with it sticking together when you go to make patties. Could just be the method I use, but I don't see where the stories of "my burgers fell apart" come from.

  5. #5

    Default Run it through twice

    I'm assuming you have your own grinder. I run mine through twice, once on course and once on a medium setting. I don't add anything to the burger. If I actually want to grill hamburgers, I use eggs to hold the burger together and don't overcook it. It will stay together and be about the juciest burger you have ever had. I also like to fry my moose burgers in a cast iron skillet and scrape the fried moose blood out and add it to my burger. Sounds kinda gross, but tastes really good.

    If you are used to fatty hamburger, you may want to take half of your burger and go with a 10% fat addition, and wean yourself into the world of lean and healthy burgers.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dipper View Post
    I'm assuming you have your own grinder. I run mine through twice, once on course and once on a medium setting. I don't add anything to the burger. If I actually want to grill hamburgers, I use eggs to hold the burger together and don't overcook it. It will stay together and be about the juciest burger you have ever had. I also like to fry my moose burgers in a cast iron skillet and scrape the fried moose blood out and add it to my burger. Sounds kinda gross, but tastes really good.

    If you are used to fatty hamburger, you may want to take half of your burger and go with a 10% fat addition, and wean yourself into the world of lean and healthy burgers.
    I second the "run through twice" method. First run is a coarse grind, probably in the 1/4" diameter range, then the 2nd is something about half that or less.

  7. #7
    Member ironartist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Meadow Lakes
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    I will never not put beef fat in my moose again. I made the same post 2 years ago stating I add fat and everyone jumped on the wagon saying how unhealthy it is, so I tried it without . Well I don't care I want to eat well and have my burg stay togather with 15% atleast I agree with Bill but if you like eating hockey pucks don't add it but from now on I will.
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
    Μολών λαβέ

  8. #8
    Member blasterak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    14A
    Posts
    912

    Default

    Usually have 15-20% beef fat added, like my burgers juicy and as said like to eat well.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    256

    Default

    I don't add anything while grinding, sometimes I add eggs or olive oil before cooking. If your burgers are coming out like hockey pucks-I'd guess they are way over cooked, mine are always juicy and my wife claims " This is the best burger I've ever had" on a regular basis.

    KK

  10. #10

    Default

    I use to add beef fat to my wild game meat but this year I decided to skip it and go with just the meat by itself. Like northriver21, I just don't see the point in adding beef fat from steroid injected cows when I have the best, most pure meat ready to eat. If you can find some natural freee range beef fat then I would probably got that route. Something to think about, I know a lot of folks that add pork to their wild game, though I have never done it myself, it would make a killer meat loaf.

  11. #11
    Member ironartist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Meadow Lakes
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandiyohi Kid View Post
    If your burgers are coming out like hockey pucks-I'd guess they are way over cooked,
    KK
    Nope my oladies a killer cook, the issue isn't over cooked the issue is a dry burger that falls apart. It's fine with pasta but as far as a hamburger goes and having to add an egg or olive oil isn't like adding good ol beef fat. And to agree with akhunter if I could locate a all natrual FAT then thats what I'd buy but since not I buy what shoprite has, it's probably the best in the valley.
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
    Μολών λαβέ

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    Nope my oladies a killer cook, the issue isn't over cooked the issue is a dry burger that falls apart. It's fine with pasta but as far as a hamburger goes and having to add an egg or olive oil isn't like adding good ol beef fat. And to agree with akhunter if I could locate a all natrual FAT then thats what I'd buy but since not I buy what shoprite has, it's probably the best in the valley.
    I still don't get where the "burger that falls apart" comes from. We have never added anything to our burger and never had any problems with it "falling apart". Don't add anything like eggs or olive oil to it other than maybe a litle seasoning either. Could be just by the method of packaging. I make patties when I grind the burger, so they are ready to cook right out of the freezer (after thawing of course). Make the ball of meat, pack the ball of meat in cellophane and compress with a plate. Once you do a few, you get good at having the right amount of "slack" in the cellophan to create the right size burger. Package as many as I like to get out of the big freezer at once in a single pack (usually 8 patties) and it's ready to go.

  13. #13

    Default

    Same here anchskier, i've eaten quite a few burgers from this years moose and have added nothing but some seasoning to it and they have never fallen apart. I always thought that was the case until I tried it for myself. Now i'll never go back to eating burgers with fat added to it.

  14. #14
    Member Huntress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Somewhere between here and there.....
    Posts
    1,173

    Default

    Ankhunter and skier,

    We don't add fat to our grind either and they are the best burgers/meatloaf I have ever had. The only time I have had a burger that crumbled and was dry was when it was over cooked.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  15. #15
    Member cusackla's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    676

    Talking Tons of different opinions

    Personally I like 15% beef fat for burger and 15% pork fat for breakfast sausage, but these days I don't have the time to process my own, so I just drop it off and pick it up.
    When I did my own, I used to try little batches of different mixes and than go with what I liked best at the time.
    If you are doing your own processing, you might want to run a couple of small batches through the samplier pan test, than go with what you like.
    Used to work for me.
    Heck there is a reason why there is 1.5 million plus cook books, being of Cajun descent I tend to like a lot of flavor in my food!

  16. #16

    Default

    Try grinding in some bacon. That's what we switched too. Makes some pretty tasty burger. The hickory flavored bacon gives it a nice flavor.

  17. #17
    Member moose-head's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    @ Seminary, Dubuque Ia
    Posts
    839

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hewey 260 View Post
    Try grinding in some bacon. That's what we switched too. Makes some pretty tasty burger. The hickory flavored bacon gives it a nice flavor.
    We do this with the really cheap bacon ends that are really fatty with some of ours that we will use for making hamburgers, but use most of it for hamburger helper and spaghetti and stuff so we don't add any fat to the majority of it.
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    439

    Default

    The first moose I ever shot was over 30 years ago and I ground up all of the moose tallow into the burger. It was very strong flavored. I always used beef tallow at about 10-15 percent until this year when I listened to a friend and used nothing but the moose meat. I love it and will never use the steroid injected beef tallow again.

  19. #19
    Member wykee5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sodak
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Thanks for the info everybody. I will probably try a few small test batches and see how it goes. I really am not overly concerned with "steroid injected beef" as much as I am with taste. I haven't bought hamburger in years, but I'll confess to hitting up Mr. Prime Beef for some nice ribeyes every now and then. I rendered some of the fat off the moose to see if it was strong at all, and it is very mild with no off flavor at all. I've actually been doing some cooking with it instead of butter. Not sure which one is more (or less) healthy. I'll run some test batches when I start grinding burger in a day or two and post what I find out.

  20. #20
    Member Sterlingmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Sterling, AK
    Posts
    293

    Lightbulb Porky Pig

    I use about 20% pork mixed with the moose or caribou when grinding. I mix them on the first coarse grind, then run it again through the finer grind so it mixes really well and has a good texture...I buy the cheapest pork rump roast I can buy. Here on the peninsula it can get as cheap as .99 a pound. Lots cheaper than mixing with beef and we prefer the subtle pork flavoring more that beef. Some beef has a strong tasting fat that doesn't do well with moose.

    If you decide to to sausage, you can use the same cuts of pork as your base for the sausage. Really makes a good Italian, hot or mild.

    As was shown on another post, package the burger in bags large enough to flatten out the meat and store it flat in the freezer. Great for storage and thawing.

    Have fun, however you go. Glad you have something to grind into fodder.

    M

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •