Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: My Wallas 2400 heater is sick?

  1. #1
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default My Wallas 2400 heater is sick?

    As you can tell from my sudden surge in posts, I'm trying to make good use of the off season by working on my boat.

    I never needed to use the Wallas 2400 heater this summer, but I tried to start it a few weeks back without success. It puffs some smoke out the exhaust for about 2-1/2 to 3 minutes, and then shifts into another mode as evidenced by the fan speed changing and the fuel pump decreases its pump rate by half.

    I talked with a friend who uses a kerosene heater in his garage (a wick type), and his advise match my thoughts about what was wrong. The kerosene tank was only about half full, and the fuel was not completely clear. My guess is the previous owner left the fuel in there for a good while before I bought the boat this Spring. I removed the fuel, cleaned the tank, let the fuel line and fuel return line drain, but I couldn't get into the heater very easily to do any more. My hope was fresh kerosene would fire it up, but the symptoms didn't change. She reliably seems to try and ignite, but I still only get a little less than three minutes of smoke exhaust and the red pilot light never lights up on the control panels.

    Suggestions please.

    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2

    Default Scan Marine very helpful

    Call Scan Marine 1-888-606-6665 - Seattle. I had the same kind of trouble with my Wallas and they gave me lots of help to resolve the problem. I'll bet the fuel drip tube in the burn chamber is plugged or sooted up, and that will require a tear down. I did the work myself with Scans help and was glad I did. You learn alot about the heater and was worth the effort. Their web site also has a lot of great information on heater maintenance and fuel care. Worth reading.

    I was extremely pleased with their willingness to provide technical support and parts were always shipped timely. Great company.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default How many volts are you at?

    The wallas heaters, stoves, and ovens are very sensitive to voltage changes for startup. If you house bank is low this could easily be the culprit. I had lots of issues with my wallas in the old boat and scan marine got me going each time. They were great to work with.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  4. #4
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Thanks guys! Sounds like Scan Marine is a great resource. I've sent them the details of my problem, and I'll talk with them Monday.

  5. #5
    Member breausaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Agree with other comment regarding voltage; make sure your battery is fully charged. If you haven’t used it for a long time it may just take a few cycles to get fuel up to the stove. When you finally get it working turn it on occasionally, lack of use is another enemy of the Wallas.

    We have the two burner ceramic cook top/heater in our C-dory and use it all summer long; early season it runs 24hrs a day. In the winter I replace the fuel in the tank with Number 1 so I can start it up periodically throughout the winter.


    Also, Scan will probable recommend Diesel over kerosene if your heater is made for it...it's stable much longer.


    Let us know how it goes,
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whatablast View Post
    Call Scan Marine 1-888-606-6665 - Seattle. I had the same kind of trouble with my Wallas and they gave me lots of help to resolve the problem. I'll bet the fuel drip tube in the burn chamber is plugged or sooted up, and that will require a tear down. I did the work myself with Scans help and was glad I did. You learn alot about the heater and was worth the effort. Their web site also has a lot of great information on heater maintenance and fuel care. Worth reading.

    I was extremely pleased with their willingness to provide technical support and parts were always shipped timely. Great company.

    Good luck.
    I agree wit this, i had a problem this summer and they helped me fix it myself. The heaters look daunting, but really aren't all that compliated. Givem a call.

  7. #7

    Default

    You may need to dissasemble it partially and pull out the fuel "injector". It's really just a small metal tube that drips fuel on the hot glow plug. It sounds like it's dribbling and not dripping... I fixed this on my boat by sliding out the injector tube and using a 1/8 inch drill bit to gently grind out the black soot that builds up in there. Once it's clear it will fire and the control unit detects a good burn and keeps the fuel coming out.

    Also, since you've had so many failed starts, you may need to run through the reset sequence that is laid out in the troubleshooting section of your manual. I don't remember it exactly, but it got my unit going again.

    If this doesn't work then definitely talk to Scan Marine. They're a great resource. Prices on parts are crazy expensive, but luckily the guys selling them are good about not selling you stuff you don't need.

  8. #8

    Default

    heathhjohnson was it a 1/8" or 1/16" drill bit???

  9. #9

    Default

    Hmm, now you have me doubting myself on that one! I'll break it down into something simple. Whichever drill bit fits perfectly into the injector tube is the one, I remember 1/8th from a year ago when I did mine, but whatablast may very well be right, a 1/16th may be the one. Start small and move up a size if it fits, and MORE importantly - do this without a drill, just use your fingers.

  10. #10
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Thanks guys! Great suggestions, and I'm not at all intimidated by diving into something. I'm used to getting into electronic equipment from my military years (28), and I've worked on repairing and restoring vehicles. As such, I know how much easier a job can be going into it with good guidance and not guessing.

    I was swamped at work the last two days getting ready to go on vacation for a week so I didn't call Scan Marine, and they didn't send me a reply to my on-line submission for help. So I'll give them a call when I get back and post the results for all.

    I don't think #1 is an option. The 2400 is for kerosene while the 30 and 40 are for kerosene or #1.

    I'll definitely exercise this thing a lot more after I fix it. Using a little fuel is definitely worth preventing problems. I find it curious they use a pretty clear tank and not one that keeps out the light....except a small vertical line for seeing the fuel level in the tank. The plastic tanks also seem to sweat more.

    Voltage is good. The boats only been out of the water a couple weeks, and I watched the fresh kerosene get pumped up through the fuel line pretty quickly since it had to push air in front of it.

  11. #11

    Default

    Well, at least you know your fuel pump is working. That is the expensive part if that were to fail, I priced one at around $450! It really sounds like you have a clogged injector. They symptoms are exactly what I had and I fixed it relatively easily like I described below.

  12. #12
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default Repair results

    I'm a bit late in posting the results of my troubleshooting, but I've actually had more than one thing happen. I've also made some decisions that I'll post for others to consider. I hope this will help others who may look for helpful info.

    I've talked with Mike at Scan Marine a few times, and he's been very helpful. He did as some of you said, he wanted me to verify my voltage and more importantly the current drawn by the heater during initial startup. Voltage was good, and current (measured in-line at the battery) was 6.9A (good too). Fuel flow was deemed good because fuel return into the tank was steady. It was time to take apart the heater and inspect the wick and combustion chamber. Removal from the boat wasn't too tough, but I dislike the whimpy power connections on the PCB.

    The wick and combustion chamber was badly sooted, and Mike believes this is a result of the previous owner using diesel instead of kerosene. I'm not entirely sure since I do believe the kerosene was too old, but another problem that I found (will cover a bit later) may have contributed to this symptom. Here's a couple pictures (my first to post on this site).

    I've included pictures of the combustion chamber bottom before I opened it, which with digital cameras is easy and makes sure I don't forget something when I re-assemble. I also included a picture of the open combustion chamber, the top of the wick (with the mountain of soot), and the bottom of the wick which also shows the heating element. Since I can only post two pictures in this shot, I'll continue with the othe two as I continue.

    WallasChamberBottom.jpg

    WallasCombChamber.jpg

  13. #13
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default Part 2

    Mike's other suspicion was the heater element had problems, but since the heater was creating smoke and the current was right, it was a bit of a mystery. Obviously, the soot shows the problem.

    So I cleaned the soot off all the components and out of the chamber, re-assembled, installed, and tested the heater. This time I could feel the chamber getting warm by reaching inside the lower hot air duct, but I didn't know how warm it was supposed to get. When I talked with Mike next, he told me it should get to something over 400 degrees. So something was still wrong. I ordered a replacement heater element kit that has the gaskets too for starters because cleaning the soot off the wick and heater element didn't was an improvement, but I wasn't confident everything was completely right.

    I installed the new wick, heater element, and gaskets, and then I tried the heater again. Something was still wrong, but I did hear signs of what i call a whoofing sound from the chamber, which was a sign the chamber was trying to kick in. Then Mike and I stumbled on the fact that the exhaust smoke was just drifting out of exhaust stack on the side of the boat without any force. He had me check the combustion fan that lightly blows air into the combustion chamber via the aluminum tube (not pictured) that directs air up through the heater element and wick. I partially disassembled the heater on the boat so I could check the air, and I barely felt anything. So from past experience, I tapped on the side of the fan motor case, and it started to blow. I did it a few more times, and then tried the heater. It worked!!!! I could hear the whoofing of the combustion chamber till it started up completely, and then the red pilot light finally came on signalling the unit had come up to temperature. The other fan that blows the heated air felt goooooood.

    this was the other problem I mentioned earlier that could have caused the heavy sooting with kerosene, but I still wonder since I don't know if burning kerosene (without the combustion air) would create soot like this. Since the combustion air fan is sealed and hard to remove, I brought my air compressor out to the boat and blew light psi (<20) air bursts into the fan outlet and inlet to clear any debris. Only do this in very short bursts with low psi air though. Long burst with higher psi could burn out the motor by spinning it too fast and too long. The saga isn't over, and I'll continue.

    WallasWickTop.jpg

    WallasHeaterElement.jpg

  14. #14
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default Part 3

    The last problem came up after a hunting trip when the pilot light wouldn't go off after shutting down the heater. Normally the heater should cool down enough in 5 - 10 minutes after flipping the toggle switch off on the control panel. During that time the blower fan keeps running to blow air across the heating chamber to cool it off. Once it cools off, a bi-metal switch inside the heater opens to turn off the pilot light, which turns off the fan. During turn-on, the pilot light doesn't come on till the bi-metal switch closes.

    So, you can see the problem, the fan continues to run endlessly after the heater has cooled off because the bi-metal swtch is telling the heater it's hot. Only way to defeat this is to remove power, which I did on the hunt by pulling the in-line fuse. Not a very convenient option since the fuse is back by the batteries, and I feel this is a weakness of the install. I've now installed a toggle switch in-line with the hot lead, and the toggle is inside the cabin under the dash. The toggle is rated for 15 amps, and now I can kill power to the heater for safety reasons too.

    To fix the problem, I ordered another bi-metal switch from Scan Marine and installed it. Good to go again!

    The only other problem I'm having is with the exposed through hull exhaust fitting, 2467. It's too open to water intrusion, and that's a real problem during rough seas when I am running the heater. Scan Marine sells a duplex deck fitting, 3468, that i think would work well, but the darn thing cost $225! So, I've instead ordered a S.S. 5" clam shell to cover the fitting, and that should provide the protection while still leaving enough room for exhaust smoke to get out while the heater pulls in fresh air too.

    This post is long enough, and I doubt anyone wants to hear any more. But I know how much I needed to learn about this heater in the beginning, and this should help others looking for tidbits of info.

    I've now run one of two heating ducts off the heater to improve it's effectiveness in the boat.

    Mike
    Last edited by HuntKodiak; 01-02-2010 at 15:44. Reason: paragraphs out of order

  15. #15

    Default

    Thanks for the update. Let us know how the clamshell works for you.

  16. #16
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Well, I've got the clamshell finished, but the install wasn't without modifications.

    I bought a clamshell that's about 5" tall and 6-1/2" long, and I added a couple of additional mounting holes on the front edge because it came with only one in the middle. Then I let myself get rushed with the install. I mounted the clamshell instead of taping it in position for a test run with the heater. I was restricted from mounting the shell any further forward because the bulkhead starts to curve around the front of the boat. So that meant the exhaust was positioned farther forward inside the shell than I should have mounted it. This ended up causing the heater to soot a bit on the high setting and soot even more on the 1/2 setting. This was because the shell created a cave like situation that limited the fresh air available to the intake.

    So crap. I knew better, but thought I'd dive in because I thought it would certainly work fine. I let it sit for about a week or so to ponder the best fix...patience.....something I should have done in the beginning.

    The solution I took was to cut the shell back so the edge was just past the edge of the exhaust mounting hardware. This also meant I had to plug a couple small hole that I drill through the aluminum into the cabin. You can still see them in the picture because I haven't finished their repair.

    Plus, I added some 1/4" vent holds on the bottom and front edge to give additional fresh air access. Only in the roughest of water should these holes let any water through them, and it'll still be minimal and indirect. So the heater should stay protected even then.

    Here's a picture. I'd have included a second one looking forward into the shell, but our wonderfully reliable cell service here in Kodiak just quit working again. Geez.

    Clamshell.jpg

  17. #17

    Default

    Sounds like at first there was maybe some backpressure of sorts because the exhaust couldn't freely exit. But looks like you might have fixed it the way you needed it. I wonder if you're sitting still and the wind comes from behind the boat (aft to forward) if the clamshell will trap or funnel the air into the exhaust and cause sooting problems.

  18. #18
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    I have my doubts that back-pressure on exhaust was the problem, but instead, I think some exhaust gas was getting pulled back in by the supply fan. That's the challenge with this kind of double pipe exhaust/supply setup. The combustion process needs enough fresh air blowing into the chamber for a proper burn. Without it, I think the sooting develops.

    With the original shell, I think the "cave" didn't create back-pressure but instead had a longer distance for the fresh air to flow in for the supply. Meanwhile, there was nothing keeping the supply fan from pulling in some of the exhaust gas that was on its way out of the cave, which resulted in supply air that was lower on oxygen content.

    Now that I cut about 2" off the length of the shell and added the 1/4" holes, I have a perfect burn on the high setting and a little sooting on the 1/2 setting while the boat sits on my property without any wind. I'll post the other picture taken from the stern perspective once I can send it off my cell phone.

    Normally I'll be making way on the water which will help the situation. I don't expect I'll have continuous wind from the rear since that would normally cause the boat to spin around and nose into the wind. But the fun part of finding out is that I'll just have to go fishing to test her! Hey honey, wanna go for a boat ride!

  19. #19
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Here's the rear view of the clamshell.


    Clamshell_Rear.jpg

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    9

    Default Thanks for the post

    I've been looking for troubleshooting help. You describe almost exactly what I've been having since rebuilding mine, including fingers on the combustion chamber 8>).

    I have an exhaust stream that looks "OK" to me, but I'll check it tomorrow to see if the fan is really going....I'm thinking it may not be.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •