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Thread: Day pack in the back-country

  1. #1

    Default Day pack in the back-country

    O.K., don't brand me an idiot but here's an honest question. I understand the point of a large bag to get you deep into the woods with your camp and still have enough room to pack out your beast but what do you use for a day pack once you set up your spike camp and you don't need your big bag anymore? I'm a huge Badlands fan. I can't say enough good things about the 4500 but once I get camp in, I don't want to carry that large bag around but I still need a good day pack to carry my rations for the day and my spotter. What are y'all using or how do you approach this situation? As usual, any and all wisdom from y'all is appreciated!!!
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  2. #2
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    What will you do when you get an animal down away from spike camp? Leave it there, go to camp, get the big pack, then going back to get it is not an option for me. Coming from a sheep hunting perspective you are always looking for ways to get lighter. Carrying a second pack for day hunting away from spike camp defeats the purpose. My sheep pack has cinch straps across the pack to snug up the smallest of loads. My pack contents on day hunts away from spike camp this year consisted of one mountain house, one game bag, cook pot, stove, and water. The spotter was in the top pouch and the pack was so light I don't notice it is full size. Some bags have the option of removing the top pouch and turning it into a waist bag, but that still leaves the question of what happens when an animal is down.

  3. #3

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    mod_elan, the shortcomings that you identify are part of the equation that I am asking for opinions on. While out west hunting elk, once I set up spike camp I used to just take the lid off of the Badlands 4500 and use it. I have found that this doesn't do much for carrying the spotter and yes, once you have an animal down you have to go back to camp to the big bag thus I am considering moving over to the Mystery Ranch 6500 because the whole pack is very modular. I assume you hunt with your camp on your back? I was just wondering what other did to get ideas for future gear purchases.
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  4. #4
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have a HUGE pack and I hunt with it on. I keep a bivi and several other key items with me at all times so there is allways something to tote in the pack. Mine was designed so that you could pull the top pocket, side pocket, and back pocket off toss em in the pack, then pull out the bayonetts which shortens the frame down so I can roll the top down. After that just pull the compression straps tight and you have a pretty compact light weight pack that can blow back up to haul a good sized goat out.

    Here is a stock phot to give you an idea what I mean.


    If I really want to go light I can just use the top pocket as a hip pack and for just a bit more storage I can yank the 700 cu inch back pocket off and carry it as a frameless pack.


    Here is the lid pocket in hip pack mode.

  5. #5

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    That's an interesting pack Lujon, what is the make and model?
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  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    My pack is a custom Dan McHale INEX. They make the cost of the MR packs look like a down right bargain but it is truly a fantastic setup built specifically for you with numerous options so basically you get to choose every detail.

    Ask Alaska_Lanche about the MR 6500 pack if you are interested in them, he has owned most of the line from Dana at this point and has got them pretty well figured out. I will likely purchase one of the MR packs for my wife in the next year or so to replace her Gregory. Unless of course I break down and have Dan build her one too...

  7. #7

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    The Kifaru longhunter g2 is an option. Remove the main bag and use the top pocket for day essentials still attatched to the frame so you can still haul meat.The top pocket can also be used as a lumbar pack w/o the frame. ENOUGH Mchale temptations-- its hard on a marriage!

  8. #8

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    I use a Mystery Ranch NICE 6500 accompanied by a Mystery Ranch load sling on trips that I know are going to require more than one trip out of when in the backcountry. The load sling simply rides between my pack and the NICE pack frame and when I get to my base camp I take off the NICE 6500 pack from the frame and use the load sling/ the daypack off my NICE 6500/and some NICE pockets as my daypack setup for hunting away from base camp. In this configuration it is more than capable of hauling 100 lb load back to camp when needed, but also able to fit my water bladder in the daypack lid in additon to some other emergency gear and my spotter and tripod in one NICE pocket and my raingear in the other NICE pocket. This still leaves the entire loadsling free to haul meat back. It the setup works well for me and the only weight penalty is 1 lb for the load sling in is doable in order to save 4 pounds in daypack mode. Plus as an added bonus the loadsling in conjunction with the NICE frame can make a killer camp chair for sitting around the fire similar to a bleacher chair.

    Here is a pick of my wife with the NICE frame, loadsling, daypack lid, and nice pockets, oh and the front half of a caribou



    It is hard to explain how the different packs work with the NICE frame without seeing them first hand so if you'd like to get together to see how these work let me know.

  9. #9

    Default $

    I agree, the Longhunter has daypack capabilities. I havnt used it on mine but it's an option.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6dZt2U6miM

  10. #10
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Most of the time I am hunting with camp on my back, but this year we were able to setup the tents and hunt a couple valleys using a spike camp. This meant we cinched the compression straps down on the Ospreys and went light during the day. I really don't see a downside with carrying a full size, empty pack during the day as long as it can be compressed properly.

    What do all these packs weigh? My experience is removable pockets and/or modular features add weight in a pack. If you're not going very far or not in vertical country then it would be okay, but for the mountains every ounce counts.

    Lujon: I'm guessing yours may be an exception as it is probably made with very light weight materials?

  11. #11
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I also use a fullsize pack all the time and have no issues with it. I was brought up that way though so maybe it has something to do with my outlook on the subject. Like mod elan points out they are real light once you set camp up!
    http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...0junk/reag.jpg

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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by mod elan View Post
    Most of the time I am hunting with camp on my back, but this year we were able to setup the tents and hunt a couple valleys using a spike camp. This meant we cinched the compression straps down on the Ospreys and went light during the day. I really don't see a downside with carrying a full size, empty pack during the day as long as it can be compressed properly.

    What do all these packs weigh? My experience is removable pockets and/or modular features add weight in a pack. If you're not going very far or not in vertical country then it would be okay, but for the mountains every ounce counts.

    Lujon: I'm guessing yours may be an exception as it is probably made with very light weight materials?
    G1 Longhunter weighs 6lb 14oz. Quite light.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitepalm View Post
    G1 Longhunter weighs 6lb 14oz. Quite light.
    Whitepalm, does that weight include the frame or is the weights that Kifaru quotes just the pack? I would suspect that the weight is for just the pack and not include the frame as I have never seen a pack of the size of the G1 and now the G2's that are that light...I could be wrong though so let me know.
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  14. #14

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    Good question, I've never found the perfect answer.

    I have a custom made fanny pack similar to the Badlands Monster ( http://www.badlandspacks.com/monster.php ), it's 1,000ci + with shoulder straps. When I pack in I strap it on my backpack with my daily hunting gear in it, then I wear it out from camp each day.

    When I hunt from a main camp or day hunt from the road I strap this little baby on the fanny pack: http://www.archerywarehouse.com/rmrhino.htm .
    It's awesome. Very well made and strong, easy and fast to put together. Well worth the bucks. It came in handy this year and it's the second of this type I've had, the other one was a different brand and I didn't like it as well.
    It doesn't matter what you miss them with.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by KClark View Post
    Good question, I've never found the perfect answer.

    I have a custom made fanny pack similar to the Badlands Monster ( http://www.badlandspacks.com/monster.php ), it's 1,000ci + with shoulder straps. When I pack in I strap it on my backpack with my daily hunting gear in it, then I wear it out from camp each day.

    When I hunt from a main camp or day hunt from the road I strap this little baby on the fanny pack: http://www.archerywarehouse.com/rmrhino.htm .
    It's awesome. Very well made and strong, easy and fast to put together. Well worth the bucks. It came in handy this year and it's the second of this type I've had, the other one was a different brand and I didn't like it as well.
    This is something that I considered in the past but it's an extra two pounds and whether I am pounding mountains in Montana or Alaska, that's just two extra pounds that I don't want to carry...unless it is truly worth it. The other disadvantage that I see is where are you going to place your spotter?
    Loving God, Loving People, Loving America--Serving All Three

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