Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: Strike indicator attach point

  1. #1
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    1,265

    Default Strike indicator attach point

    I was told when first learning how to fly fish (still learning a lot, only been doing it for a couple years) that you should try to determine how deep the water is, double that depth, and that is where you should attach your strike indicator and to use just enough weight to "bump" the rocks anywhere from 8 to 20 inches up the line. What is everone's thought on the subject?
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  2. #2
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Yes, but..

    That's pretty much the way I learned it, but I have gotten lazy the last few years and I now pretty much just leave it about 12 inches down from the tip of my fly-line. It seems to work pretty well for most situations. If I'm fishing a small stream, or a consistently shallow side channel, I'll lower it, but for the Kenai, I don't move it much.

  3. #3
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    I put it about 18 inches from my line at all times, unless I'm suspending something in really slow water, in which case I use a dry where legal instead of a bobber
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  4. #4
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    how much tippet material do you guys use? I've read that 18" is the norm and that's nomally what I use but with a 7-10' leader thats gonna give you a lot of line between the fly and the indicator. This just seems like to much line to me to be swirling around under the water. It just seems to me that this might hinder your hook setting or trouble detecting stikes with so much line out there the fish could pick up the fly and wander off with out you ever detecting a strike. Am I correct in my assumption or way off? I want to get better at this
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  5. #5
    Member tjm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor_1 View Post
    This just seems like to much line to me to be swirling around under the water.
    it is a lot just swirling around if your presentation is poor....but 7' to 10' is pretty good for most situations up here....keep the bobbers your furthest point down stream....keep the fly as directly upstream as you can..... bobber fishing is quite easy and effective when done correctly....
    ------------------------------------------------
    pull my finger....

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    867

    Default

    As far as hooksetting on the rig with the long leader and indicator you will need to keep in mind where you are? If you are dwon current from the indicator when it detects the strike a simple swift lift on the rod is in order. If you have mended lots of line and the indicator is down current a sweeping side strike might best get you in contact with the fly. The indicator will most always be down current from the presentation so a down current strike set or a side set is what you need to work for...

    George

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    I use as much tippet as I need to get a long enough leader, maybe 24 inches to start and it gets shorter and shorter as the days go on... Of course I build my own leaders too.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    Right on fellas I'll give these methods a whirl I really appreciate it, I'm just trying to get better at it....there's something about catching a fish on a fly, nothing beats it
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default

    For me it depends on what I'm fishing,

    If it's a bead, I usually put it at my fly line one a 8 to 10 foot leader, with a pair of bb's about 15 inches up. I'll shorten up to suspended fish in a slow water area but usually you want your indicator to be downstream of the bead and essentially dragging bottom. If you can see it tick tick tick, then you know you are down there.

    WIth a nymph, it's the ol "whatever it takes to get it near the bottom" technique. And try to have a near vertical presentation.

    I find i do nearly as well just dead drifting nymphs and even purposely giving a little swing at the end, however the indicator seems to help more with the beads.

    ps, I fish with both....a lot. But, do whatever starts workin.

  10. #10
    Member Danny Boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    182

    Default

    Lose the bobber ~ you'll catch more fish.

  11. #11
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    Not that good at it yet to lose the bobber
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  12. #12

    Default Need sugguestion

    I have lost most of the feelings in my finger tips, can't feel stikes any longer. Any ideas what I can do?

    Big Fisherman

  13. #13
    Member tjm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor_1 View Post
    Not that good at it yet to lose the bobber
    don't fall into that ego trap....properly fished the bobber will inform you of many many more hits....if it is a numbers game then the bobber will always win when nymphing....

    having said that, my preference is to ditch the bobber and swing/strip big flies...but yields less fish...
    ------------------------------------------------
    pull my finger....

  14. #14
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Over and over and over and over and over and over and

    It seems like we've had this discussion a time or ten. I'm one who believes there's a time to bobber and a time not to bobber. For small stream nymphing, I typically don't use a bobber, or I'll use a bushy dry with a nymph dropper (when I'm fishing in MT or northern CA where it's legal). With beads on the Kenai, I like to bobber; I know for a fact it slows my reflexes down so when I switch to dries, I miss the first many strikes. But alas, living in Kenai, I've just come to the conclusion that beads and bobbers work...period. I don't beat myself up anymore about whether or not it's truly fly-fishing. Call me less of a fly-fisherman if you like, but I still seem to do alright with the real thing when it's necessary.

    I will say that the first day of a trip to any place where dry fly fishing is the rule, I'm always cussing myself for getting so lazy at home. But when at home, I just can't help myself; bobbers work, and I just can't get enough of those big Kenai Bows!

  15. #15
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default really?????

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottsum View Post
    It seems like we've had this discussion a time or ten. I'm one who believes there's a time to bobber and a time not to bobber. For small stream nymphing, I typically don't use a bobber, or I'll use a bushy dry with a nymph dropper (when I'm fishing in MT or northern CA where it's legal). With beads on the Kenai, I like to bobber; I know for a fact it slows my reflexes down so when I switch to dries, I miss the first many strikes. But alas, living in Kenai, I've just come to the conclusion that beads and bobbers work...period. I don't beat myself up anymore about whether or not it's truly fly-fishing. Call me less of a fly-fisherman if you like, but I still seem to do alright with the real thing when it's necessary.

    I will say that the first day of a trip to any place where dry fly fishing is the rule, I'm always cussing myself for getting so lazy at home. But when at home, I just can't help myself; bobbers work, and I just can't get enough of those big Kenai Bows!

    Well said Scott. It seems that every post that has a question related to using an indicator, someone has to throw in a comment about not needing "bobbers", because they are better at fishing. It gets old after a while. If you want to debate the bobber vs. no bobber again, start another thread about it.
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  16. #16
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    I have nothing against the guys that like to go without a bobber/indicator or those that prefer to use one. I love fly fishing but I am not a purist. I just like to catch fish and whatever is gonna give me the edge to get more fish to the bank is fine by me. I am mostly a catch and release fisherman but keep the occasional salmon for the table. I've never kept a dollie or a bow but from what I'm told I am missing out. My opinion on the whole thing is to have a good time with good people and catch some fish no matter what the method. Of coarse there is gonna be some bantering to which method is better which is the nature of the thing and part of the fun. That's what makes this sport so great. People can share their methods and techniques and others can chose to adopt them or use their own. There's no better joy in this world than having a fish at the end of your line no matter what the method!!!!
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    867

    Default

    Raptor,

    Great thought process on fly fishing. My idea is fly fishing is personal and social. I think most of us have taken a path that is very similar to get to fly fishing and even if fly fishing the path takes many turns and forks in the road. I believe we have to mostly be honest with ourselve and then we can be happy with fishing.

    Wow, that was deep.

    George

  18. #18
    Member muzzyman87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    311

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jakec5253 View Post
    Well said Scott. It seems that every post that has a question related to using an indicator, someone has to throw in a comment about not needing "bobbers", because they are better at fishing. It gets old after a while. If you want to debate the bobber vs. no bobber again, start another thread about it.

    I just dont like "bobber" fishing I feel like im missing the little bumps.
    I am not against the flippin kenai, since I cannot but suspect it keeps armies of the unworthy from discovering every other stream... ~Paul O'Neil~/~Wyo2AK~

  19. #19

    Default

    boy there are days when I absolutely need one and there are days a senseless person could feel the hammer regarding strike indcators. I will say this, some of the best fisherman I see on the river use them, and they will typical out fish most if not everyone around when we're out. I dont use them too often....like I said some days I do some I dont, but I always have a couple.

    As for where to put it...another factor needs to be considered, how heavy of a fly it is and how fast the current. Sometimes you just dont have the right fly and have to make due for the situation. meaning throwing a overly weighted copper john when you could have done the same with a light we pt nymph. It'll still work and still catch fish, but you'll need to make adjustments to your set up for the extra or lack of weight...something that'll eat flies if you forget

    you could always use a dry for a indicator (and another chance at a fish where legal). It works extremely well. On lakes I like to ever so slowly skate a overly tied griffths (helps keep it floating, I'll palmer twice as many wraps for this and move up to a a size 12 instead of my typical 16's and 14s), so slowly the griffiths doesnt hardly ripple the surface, it worked so well fish and game had to check us to make sure we werent using bait . I mean really SLOOOWLY drag this setup, skate maybe a bad way of wording it. We've hammered some trout in lake using this method..absolutely deadly. Just a tip for those days you can do nothing to keep them from hitting strike indicators or they are hitting so light you can hardly feel'm. Depending on the water you can use this on rivers...however you may want to change to an even more boyant fly then an overly tied griffiths being you'll need a heavier nymph to get down to them. I alway have a couple though just in case.

  20. #20
    Member Danny Boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tjm View Post
    don't fall into that ego trap....properly fished the bobber will inform you of many many more hits....if it is a numbers game then the bobber will always win when nymphing....

    having said that, my preference is to ditch the bobber and swing/strip big flies...but yields less fish...
    I wasn't tring to be an ***** when I said lose the bobber... I've only been fly fishing since 2006 but this year ditched the bobber and have had much better success hooking up. There was one day I fished with a bobber as my backup rod was already rigged up from my buddy using it a few days before. I like having one rod rigged up for flesh and another for beads. Anyhow, I missed many more hits with the bobber than I do without. Fished beads on the Anchor w/o a bobber and caught 4 out of 5 hits over a two day span. It takes some getting used to at first, fishing without the bobber, but I truly believe it's more effective without.

    I've yet to give nymph fishing a go but have read that a bobber is almost necessary when doing so. As for big leeches, flesh gets hammered! Some would argue the necessity of the bobber with a bead, but I think those who use it with flesh are making the wrong choice. And flesh is a lot easier to swing without a bobber.

    To each his own and best of luck either way!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •