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Thread: newbie to Reloading, have a question

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Default newbie to Reloading, have a question

    I reloaded rifle bullets for the first time last night. I am reloading 30-06 with 49.5 grains of accurate 4350 powder and topped it off with a 200 grain nosler partion. I measured a factory load and set my bullet depth at that length. However when I reloaded, 2 cases came out with bulges in the necks. I was wondering what is causing this, and what I can do to fix it. Any help anybody can provide will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
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    Well, I initially had a problem with deforming cases due to not adjusting my dies right cause I didnt read the directions like I never do. Once I read the directions the problem was cured. I am not big on all the terminology, but basically you lower the ram (or handle) on your press and then screw down the die until it touches the case. You back off a tiny bit then lock the die. Then you adjust the seating depth with the screw on top of the die.

    Make sense? I had skipped step one which creates all kinds of deformed case problems!!!!
    Good luck.
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    I measured a factory load and set my bullet depth at that length. However when I reloaded, 2 cases came out with bulges in the necks. I was wondering what is causing this,
    A likely culpret is the seating die is set too low, the case length is uneven and the longer cases bumped the end of the die a bit too hard.

    Another problem could be proper alignment of the bullet when it starts it's slide into the case neck. Make sure the bullet is well centered and pointed straight and the case mouth is chamfered well.

    Good luck.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sollybug View Post
    but basically you lower the ram (or handle) on your press and then screw down the die until it touches the case. You back off a tiny bit then lock the die. Then you adjust the seating depth with the screw on top of the die.
    About the thickness of a nickel works well for no-crimp seating, that's what the little cardboard washer in the die box is for, it's an adjustment guage.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I did set the die to touch the ram, and did the adjustment with the screw on top of the die (Lee Dies) Are you supposed to widen the mouth of the neck to set the bullet before running it through the die. I noticed the bullets wouldn't fit in the neck and had to hold them with my fingers until it went into the die. I am thinking that may have been the problem, but the instructions didn't say anything about how to set the bullet before running it into the die.
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    Default cases

    Something you might look at is chamfering the case mouth. I have had 'issues' with new brass in the past. I chamfer all of my new brass and then re-chamfer them after I trim them.
    Just something else to look at.

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    Thanks for the advice everybody, I will double check my seating die and champher the neck to see if this fixes it. again thanks for the help.
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    I did set the die to touch the ram, and did the adjustment with the screw on top of the die (Lee Dies)
    If I understand what you are saying and Lee dies are like the rest then that's your problem.

    The shell holder is not intended to touch the die, the shell holder should be spaced away from the die the thickness of a nickel when the ram is at the top of its stroke.

    Hope I'm not confusing this more.

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    Default cardboard washer

    The cardboard washer is actually a rust inhibitor - vapor phase inhibitor (VPI) similar to the paper that handugns are wrapped it.

    Also works O.K. as a clearance gague.


    Quote Originally Posted by KClark View Post
    About the thickness of a nickel works well for no-crimp seating, that's what the little cardboard washer in the die box is for, it's an adjustment guage.
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    By a Redding Micrometer seating die and all will be well

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    OK first off read your directions if you have some. If not you should put the proper shellholder on your press run the ram to the top of its stroke. Screw in your seating die until it touches the shellholder then back it off 1 to 2 complete turns. You are supposed to do this to create a non crimped cartridge. If you bullets dont have a cannelure you will crush the brass because it has no groove to press into. As far a case necks go your fine with having to hold the bullet til it goes up into the die. The case is resized smaller than the bullet to set up proper neck tension this tension is what holds your bullet in the brass. You can bell the case neck a tiny bit to help the jacket slide into the neck of theb rass but if you do it too much you over work theb rass and get neck cracks after a few reloads. Lee sells a universal belling die which I use but only for Cast lead bullets, not for jacketed stuff. If you have any more questions you can PM me and I will elaborate more..

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