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Thread: More by catch ....Halibut

  1. #1
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    Default More by catch ....Halibut

    Hmmm Trawler by catch of halibut....Seems to have no redeaming social value and all users of the resource feel the pinch.... I am sure it is highly regulated ...and the influence of the billion dollar Alaska trawler fleet never influences public policy...(Ben Stevens)....And that the management system is fair to all users...(Adak Fisheries)....And that our system of checks and balances works just fine...(Never any charges filed)....anyway check this one out...

    http://tholepin.blogspot.com/2009/10...but-waste.html

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    Default All bottom trawling should be banned

    Like I've said before I have seen this first hand, couldn't believe it was legal then and still wonder why it is allowed to continue. Like you said money talks.

    As you can see in that video most, if not all the halibut thrown back floated away dead.

    Not only is this a wasteful way of fishing, it also wipes out the ocean floor, I liken it to hooking up a 500 yard chain to two D8s and dragging the chain threw the forest nocking down every tree for miles just so you could harvest a moose.

    I think if more people could see the end result of a tow there would be an outcry that would stop this waste.

    This will stop someday one way or the other, before it's to late, or after it's to late to save the fish stocks.

  3. #3
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    Default That just seems wrong no matter who you are...

    Maybe I'm crazy, but I always thought that if it were really all about saving stocks, we should force the retention of bycatch and distribute the proceeds and apply the poundage to quota share holders in troubled areas (say 2c). No waste, incentive to decrease bycatch, less pressure in areas of decreasing abundance, and quota share holders still get the money. Surely more complex programs have been created.

    Sure, the areas are far apart, but don't halibut generally migrate eastward? How many more individuals are in a ton of halibut out west versus a ton in the Gulf?

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the video.

    This has gone on for years and years, with no end in sight right now. As I've said before, plenty of halibut to go around, if we would just eliminate bycatch.

    I hope more videos surface to show the waste that is going on. A load of dead king salmon on the deck of a factory trawler would be very revealing.

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    Default Harmony?

    I am shocked to see such waste!

    I though the trawlers "lived in harmony" with the sea like the commercial guys live in harmony with the red salmon in Upper Cook Inlet.

    Perhaps someone has lied to me.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Default

    And some people complain about a few fish that charters take. those at least get eaten. There is no excuse for this. Make it mandatory for any trawker to have an observer on board. Let the trawlers pay for them.

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    Default who makes laws?

    I'm not sure why, but what they're doing is legal.

    Too bad we have no say about that... oh wait, maybe we do...

  8. #8

    Default An upstream battle!

    The trawl fleet controls the governing body, North pacific Fisheries Management Council, so this is going to continue untill organized oposition can call attention to it. All sportfishermen and longliners should be outraged. This can not continue.

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default

    g d i t m m m ! ! ! !
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

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    Default By catch good, commercial charter operators still are the bad guys...

    Come one, you guys are not seeing both sides of the argument....

    1) Commercial fishing is high regulated here in Alaska

    2) Trawlers were catching and wasteing those halibut before the "commercial charter" fleet started stealing halibut from the ocean for the general public to catch and eat.

    3) Nothing goes to waste in the ocean, the 15 millions pounds of juvinile halibut thrown back in dead, is really just food for the rest of the halibut to grow faster

    4) The State and Federal government is making sure that all the fish are being allocated to the highest and best use....so don't worry about those fish being thrown back in dead...Cod are just more important...

    5) It was just one bad tow, they don't usually catch that many.....

    6) The checks in the mail.....

    What should happen is that the trawlers should have to keep every single halbut they catch, record their harvest and sell the fish and give the money back to the IFQ shareholders for the fish they accidently caught while pursuing high value fish like cod(.30 cents a pound) or Turbot ( .20 cents a pound). If you compare the burden us illegal commercial charter operators have to go through to document every single fish our recreational fishing clients catch, to what is going on in that video, it should make you a little concerned...

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    Default I can't believe I'm saying this.

    Maybe we need to get the nut jobs at Greenpeace involved.

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    Default

    Where are the defenders of commercial fishing practices to explain to us how beneficial this is? Surely one of them has a well reasoned ( or at least well presented) argument in favor of allowing this level of bycatch to continue. This practice must be good as it allows commercial fishermen to feed the greatest number of people at the lowest cost and highest profit.

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    Default Benefits

    What is a few dead halibut thrown back overboard compared to the many tons of freezer burnt salmon taken to the dump every spring? Salmon that could be caught by the commerical guys and shipped down south to feed all those nice people down there that want wild caught fish. After all - commerical guys do render a nice service.

    Maybe more money needs to be spent on developing farm raised halibut.


    Quote Originally Posted by gusdog44 View Post
    Where are the defenders of commercial fishing practices to explain to us how beneficial this is? Surely one of them has a well reasoned ( or at least well presented) argument in favor of allowing this level of bycatch to continue. This practice must be good as it allows commercial fishermen to feed the greatest number of people at the lowest cost and highest profit.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Default It helps the needy

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    What is a few dead halibut thrown back overboard compared to the many tons of freezer burnt salmon taken to the dump every spring? Salmon that could be caught by the commerical guys and shipped down south to feed all those nice people down there that want wild caught fish. After all - commerical guys do render a nice service.

    Maybe more money needs to be spent on developing farm raised halibut.

    The food bank gets all my extra fish and game every year, long before it's freezer burnt.

    I start every spring with an empty freezer,

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    Default

    I am sure a lot of us only keep as much fish as we think we will eat. I've not taken fish to the dump in many years.....my eyes used to be bigger than my stomach.

    Bycatch is a huge waste of fish.

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    Default Everyone should be contacting Juneau to stop this

    We can talk all we want about this on the forum - but until everyone takes the time to send an E-Mail or phone their reps in Juneau - it will continue. It's very easy to send a short note on the subject to your
    representives in Juneau - take the time now and DO IT.

    http://w3.legis.state.ak.us/index.php

    http://w3.legis.state.ak.us/docs/pdf/800numbers.pdf
    How stupid is it to be wasting tons of salmon and halibut as bycatch in the Bering Sea and then have the coastal villages hollaring they have no food? It's got to stop!

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    Default A bit of sarcasm

    This was just a bit of sarcasm - a flashback from some previous threads concerning Kenai sockeyes. I totally agree that most of use use the fish we freeze.

    On aspect of charter halbut fishing does concern me: the catching of the huge trophy fish that are breeders and really not that good to eat anyway. All the derbies seem to give prizes for the largest fish. Is this really a good idea and how much of these large fish actually get consummed?


    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    What is a few dead halibut thrown back overboard compared to the many tons of freezer burnt salmon taken to the dump every spring? Salmon that could be caught by the commerical guys and shipped down south to feed all those nice people down there that want wild caught fish. After all - commerical guys do render a nice service.

    Maybe more money needs to be spent on developing farm raised halibut.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Default Old wives tail.....

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    This was just a bit of sarcasm - a flashback from some previous threads concerning Kenai sockeyes. I totally agree that most of use use the fish we freeze.

    On aspect of charter halbut fishing does concern me: the catching of the huge trophy fish that are breeders and really not that good to eat anyway. All the derbies seem to give prizes for the largest fish. Is this really a good idea and how much of these large fish actually get consummed?
    I've eaten fillet's off of fish over 300 pounds and it tasted just fine.

    I agree it's not as good as 20 pounders but it's still good. Like I tell my clients, people that catch small fish are the ones that are always saying how their the best eating.

    If you only go fishing for Halibut once a year, like many people do then you want to try for bigger fish, it only makes sense.

    Long-liners catch way more fish over 300 pounds every year then charter boats. You just don't hear about it. I took a Sitka long-liner fishing last year and he told me that his biggest fish ever was 426 pounds gilled and gutted, and that the fish over 300 hundred pounds seem to come in schools, sometimes he would get 8 or 10 over 300 # on one set.

    He also told me that they prefer not to catch them, because their harder to deal with on deck and they get a lower price for them, but they never release them.

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    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the clarifications.

    I suspect there is a "sweet spot" in size between best eating and yield but I've heard different stories. As long as the meat gets eaten and not wasted it really doesn't matter to me.

    The catching of the really large halibut by the long liners doesn't get much attention. Is there any data or fact based speculation as to the affect of the removal of these large fish on health of the fishery?


    Quote Originally Posted by Captain T View Post
    I've eaten fillet's off of fish over 300 pounds and it tasted just fine.

    I agree it's not as good as 20 pounders but it's still good. Like I tell my clients, people that catch small fish are the ones that are always saying how their the best eating.

    If you only go fishing for Halibut once a year, like many people do then you want to try for bigger fish, it only makes sense.

    Long-liners catch way more fish over 300 pounds every year then charter boats. You just don't hear about it. I took a Sitka long-liner fishing last year and he told me that his biggest fish ever was 426 pounds gilled and gutted, and that the fish over 300 hundred pounds seem to come in schools, sometimes he would get 8 or 10 over 300 # on one set.

    He also told me that they prefer not to catch them, because their harder to deal with on deck and they get a lower price for them, but they never release them.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  20. #20
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gusdog44 View Post
    Where are the defenders of commercial fishing practices to explain to us how beneficial this is?
    Come on, gus. Just because some of us defend commercial fishing in general does not mean that we will support wasteful practices. Lumping a longliner on a family-run boat in with factory trawlers is a stretch at best. Just as many sport fishermen have different ethics, so do many commercial fishermen.

    Personally, as a halibut fisherman (both sport and commercial) this kind of waste disgusts me. I would be happy to support a change that would put an end to this practice.


    tv - Fish farming is one of the more harmful things we do to aquatic ecosystems. Farms harm the wild fish more than they benefit them...by a long shot.

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