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Thread: Square back-this is different

  1. #1
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default Square back-this is different

    Have any of these Gheenoe canoes made it to Alaska? Just wondering but they are not light and don't seem to carry a very big load. It is square back and can take a good size motor. There is one for sale locally and thinking it might make a versatile fishing boat.

    http://www.gheenoe.net/fifteensix_classic.html
    Last edited by markopolo50; 11-03-2009 at 19:09. Reason: added web

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    Default light load

    I don't get why the load capacity is so small - it looks like it would be a lot more than that.

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    Default Load

    I agree with the small load question. As stable as they are touting it seems like it should haul more. I don't think it would haul a moose and a couple hunters very well.

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Load ratings

    look at the shallow sides on these boats.
    the displacement looks pretty good, and they would be a great boat in flat calm waters. Florida is a perfect place for this type of Panga type boat.
    It just looks like the shallow sides give it little room to draw..
    think that these people building these boats are not loading a moose into them, they are day trippers out on the everglades or a flat lake,, not designed for expeditions or carry more than a couple of guys and beer and fishing poles,,,
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Default

    The weight of the boat uses alot of its load weight.looks to be about 3x of a canoe at 16'

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    Default floating your moose

    personally I would take a couple of innertubes,and a hand pump and a rope . why jepordise the canoe and all your gear?

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    Default this is a planing hull and not in any way a canoe

    If this does 35mph, it is clearly on step and not in any way except pointed bow related to a canoe. The most important fact is that a canoe is a displacement hull, hence the high load capacity. No planing hull that small has much load capacity. It is the functional equivalent of a small jon boat.
    Last edited by foamsfollower; 11-29-2009 at 18:21. Reason: spelling mistake

  8. #8

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    Old thread but this video with a mud motor was pretty impressive. 24mph and pretty stable.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K1pHxew8SQ
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    I don't know if this will help you or not, but I grew up on a lake in Florida and have owned and used a number of Gheenoes; I can't say enough good things about them. I WISH I had brought one up with me. I think a lot of the things mentioned here already are at least somewhat true. The Gheenoes are, indeed, designed to be used for shallow water fishing-either coastal salt water flats (they actually market one version with a poling platform specifically for for gliding through inches of water), or freshwater backwaters, such as creeks and narrow rivers.

    They're heavy (a 16' Gheenoe averages about 120# IIRC) because they are made from thick fiberglass. They're tough; I've bounced them off rocks in the Suannee River, but that's class I, II at best (all Florida has to offer.) Even though the smaller ones are marketed as "car toppers," they're not-you need a trailer.

    The reason they're so stable is because the gunwales curve inward; it's difficult for a user to lean way out over the edge, which makes it difficult to capsize. I won't comment much on the "planing hull" theory mentioned early, but they are very maneuverable at any speed; they turn on a dime.

    A Gheenoe would be great on local lakes, such as Nancy, Big Lake, etc, but I would not want to portage it-ever. (My Old Town is 1/2 the weight of a Gheenoe and I dread portaging my Old Town.)

    If you hunt in a river where you have easy access (boat trailer access) and the worst you may have to do is pull it over shallow water, the Gheenoe would be fine. I don't know what a dressed out Moose weighs, so I couldn't guess if they'll carry the whole load. However, ours carried me, (at age 10 ~90lbs) my mom and dad, (~400lbs-ish between them) a MinnKota trolling motor and deep cycle battery (~70 lbs?) plus a 4 man canvas cabin tent, propane stove and bottles, food for 3 people for 3 days, clothes, sleeping bags, etc etc etc without an issue. (There's a photo in a family album back home-looks like a trapper's canoe loaded with beaver pelts.) I think the comment about carrying inner tubes to stay afloat is way off base.

    Anyway, hope this helps.

    PS, they're great for families because of the stability.

  10. #10

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    I think my 19 foot grumman is about 120 pounds and I sure wouldn't want to put a 27 hp beavertail on it. I'm going to look into these a little more. Anyone want to buy my 19 foot freighter so I can start my Gheenoe fund?

    Here is an interesting description of it.
    http://donjordanoutdoors.com/pages/gheenoe.htm
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    FL2AK,

    Where'd ya grow up? I'm from Winter Park but not the snobby part of town.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    Lutz, a suburb (well, it used to be a rural area) north of Tampa. I used to tournament fish with my dad at Apopka (among others), and my girlriend (Alaska raised) loves Wekiwa Springs, so you're in a nice area.

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    Know it well. We had a cabin on the beach North of Tarpon Springs and we took 19 back when it was a 2 lane road (50's-60's) to get there. I used to fish Lake Apopka too...nice bass in there. Great place until the yankees moved in. I left in 67 and never went back and I don't miss the humidity a bit.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    I don't know if this will help you or not, but I grew up on a lake in Florida and have owned and used a number of Gheenoes; I can't say enough good things about them. I WISH I had brought one up with me. I think a lot of the things mentioned here already are at least somewhat true. The Gheenoes are, indeed, designed to be used for shallow water fishing-either coastal salt water flats (they actually market one version with a poling platform specifically for for gliding through inches of water), or freshwater backwaters, such as creeks and narrow rivers.

    They're heavy (a 16' Gheenoe averages about 120# IIRC) because they are made from thick fiberglass. They're tough; I've bounced them off rocks in the Suannee River, but that's class I, II at best (all Florida has to offer.) Even though the smaller ones are marketed as "car toppers," they're not-you need a trailer.

    The reason they're so stable is because the gunwales curve inward; it's difficult for a user to lean way out over the edge, which makes it difficult to capsize. I won't comment much on the "planing hull" theory mentioned early, but they are very maneuverable at any speed; they turn on a dime.

    A Gheenoe would be great on local lakes, such as Nancy, Big Lake, etc, but I would not want to portage it-ever. (My Old Town is 1/2 the weight of a Gheenoe and I dread portaging my Old Town.)

    If you hunt in a river where you have easy access (boat trailer access) and the worst you may have to do is pull it over shallow water, the Gheenoe would be fine. I don't know what a dressed out Moose weighs, so I couldn't guess if they'll carry the whole load. However, ours carried me, (at age 10 ~90lbs) my mom and dad, (~400lbs-ish between them) a MinnKota trolling motor and deep cycle battery (~70 lbs?) plus a 4 man canvas cabin tent, propane stove and bottles, food for 3 people for 3 days, clothes, sleeping bags, etc etc etc without an issue. (There's a photo in a family album back home-looks like a trapper's canoe loaded with beaver pelts.) I think the comment about carrying inner tubes to stay afloat is way off base.

    Anyway, hope this helps.

    PS, they're great for families because of the stability.
    FL2AK-Old Town,


    Thanks for the informative and thoughtful post. Iíve wondered about Gheenoes. It seems a Gheenoe might fill a niche as a cross between a canoe and a flat bottom river boat. That is, it would be lighter and narrower than a similar length river boat, but plane better than a canoe and have a thicker hull than a canoe.


    They look like their side height is less than 20 inches. If it were increased to be greater than 20 inches, it might be very suitable for shallow river use. Maybe a custom project could incorporate all these features.


    How do you think a 16 foot Super model would do with a 27 or 35 hp surface drive motor?

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    Those Gheenoes have a nicely designed hull. It's a hybrid boat combining a narrow planning hull/wide transom with a canoe displacement hull. My canoe is essentially the same with more of a canoe bias, but with the same wide transom that actually plans out in the same manner.

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    The depth of a 19' Grumman is 14", which IMHO, is not enough for rough water. (The Scott HB is 20" deep, and the boat handles rough water quite well.) One time, on rough water with white caps and wind, my partner had to bail our 19'er while I drove the boat. The Gheenoes as pictured don't look like they have enough freeboard for serious conditions. Again, my opinion.

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    If you take some water and can keep it on a plane with the bow a little high, pull the plug and drain the water. You guys need a drain plug in the back of your canoes!!

    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    Wrong picture.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rifleman View Post
    FL2AK-Old Town,


    Thanks for the informative and thoughtful post. Iíve wondered about Gheenoes. It seems a Gheenoe might fill a niche as a cross between a canoe and a flat bottom river boat. That is, it would be lighter and narrower than a similar length river boat, but plane better than a canoe and have a thicker hull than a canoe.

    Quote Originally Posted by rifleman View Post
    They look like their side height is less than 20 inches. If it were increased to be greater than 20 inches, it might be very suitable for shallow river use. Maybe a custom project could incorporate all these features.
    They are kind of shallow boats as I remember, but they can be loaded up pretty well. I'm not sure how more freeboard is an asset in shallow water, though. Aren't most canoes less than 20" as well?


    Quote Originally Posted by rifleman View Post
    How do you think a 16 foot Super model would do with a 27 or 35 hp surface drive motor?
    When you say "surface drive" are you referring to those weed eater type outboards with the long shafts that go way back, at a low angle to the transom, and just barely go under the water?

    If so, I think you would loose some maneuverability just by the nature of making the boat longer. I've never seen those engines in FL, though. If you're thinking shallow draft issues, and weren't trying to do a lot of sharp turns etc, I think it would work great. Gheenoes draw next to no water as it is, and most of what they draw is from the outboard. (Most folks try to go with a short shaft engine.) So in that respect, you'd do well.

    As I recall, the Super16 is essentially a bass boat in diminutive form.

    As a side note on that, I broke a shear shaft on my 4hp Evinrude in the Suwannee river going over a floating log. The Gheenoe went right over the log, but the log tossed the lower unit up, which broke the shear shaft. If I had been using a surface drive, I likely would have avoided it. (Along with the 5 mi x-country hike to get the truck and trailer because I was headed upriver when it happened and, without the engine, couldn't make headway. I had to go down river several miles to another boat ramp.)

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    Often, to get to shallow water, you have to travel through varied conditions, before you reach the shallows, etc. For a dedicated shallow water boat, it might be fine, but for going exploring in the bush there are better choices. Probably a good fishing boat. Does anyone in the Fairbanks area have one?

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