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Thread: HELP!......??? about snaring Foxes.

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    Default HELP!......??? about snaring Foxes.

    I'm using snares for my 2nd year now and have nothing to show for it, so I thought I'd pick your brains for you experts out there. What in general is a good method for this and do I need to use any scent etc...? Thanks for any input. I appreciate it. Daniel

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    Default Snares for fox

    Daniel,
    Not sure what your gear looks like, but here are some basic tips that may help you get on target.
    Try to hang your snares on "sign". By that, I mean wherever you see fox tracks going through brush, hang snares. Generally, I try to hang at least two and sometimes three snares on every set of tracks I come across. The idea being that other fox will follow in the same footsteps or the original fox will pass that way again. The reason for multiple snares is in the event the fox leaves the "trail" and then re-enters further along, you'll still have a shot at him. If you only hang one snare and the fox jumps off the trail to investigate something, he may miss your one snare. Multiple snares means multiple opportunities. I like to space them out far enough apart that in the event of a double, they can't reach each other. When you get into the breeding season (Jan/Feb down here), doubles are fairly common because they are starting to pair up and run together. If you lack tracks, try setting rabbit runs and natural travel corridors (brushy creek bottoms, ridgelines, etc.). On the rabbit runs, make sure your snares are set high enough to let most of the hares pass underneath. I say "most", because no matter what you do, you'll get the odd one that jumps right into your snare.
    If you have a carcass pile or find a winter kill, back off at least 50-75 yards and set your snares perpendicular to the bait pile and in a circle around the bait. If you find a kill that is already being visited and there are existing trails, set the trails well away from the bait site. Animals get more cautious the closer they get to the bait because they don't know who or what might be already there. If you set too close to the bait/carcass pile, you're apt to catch birds (Ravens and Eagles).
    Whenever possible, set your snares on straight-aways. Canids are generally looking as far out in front of them as they can and moving at a quicker pace on straight sections. They also tend to slow down on the curves to see what might lie ahead (prey or predators).
    I know it seems like a lot to digest, but it's just a start. Once you start catching on, you'll pick it up even quicker and you'll probably never stop learning. I know I don't!
    When all else fails, contact the ATA guys in Fairbanks and ask for some help. You can usually find somebody to show you the ropes and break it down for you. Hope this helps!

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    so spike how big is your hoop and how high off the ground?

    when you see that fox sing do you fence with sticks to steer them in or let it be alnatuarl?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    A good rule of thumb is dinner plate size hoop. Fox (about 7-9 inches in diam) and 6-9 inches off the ground, Coyotes just a little larger 9-11 in diam. Coyotes are about knee height.
    We use twigs and sticks to steer them and somewhat camouflage the snare. We have had some that will completely avoid a snare in the open. but do keep it natural, they will avoid anything if it's been "changed". We have had better luck when we don't disturb their tracks or sign, try to stay to the side or make your own trail into where you want to set the snare without disturbing the area too much. We have even better luck when we set our snowmachine tracks/trails.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    All of what was said above...and NO SCENT!!

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    dkwarthog,

    I have to agree on the no scent thing, We use cotton gloves and when they get wet they are changed out to a new pair. Some folks I know use medical nitrile exam gloves.

    BUT, what about these folks I have seen setting sets with a cigarette in their mouths and STILL catch stuff?
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Default Snares for fox

    When it comes to scent control, I am a fanatic about it. Not sure it is really necessary in areas where there is normal human activity, as I think the animals get rather used to it, but I do it all the same. I figure it is always better to be careful with scent control so you don't develop bad habits and screw up when it really counts! Like Huntress and her spouse, I use cotton gloves and change them frequently throughout the day.
    Echo what Huntress said about loop sizes (though I keep experimenting with them) and heights from the ground. If you get your loops too big, you'll have animals jump through them and occassionally get caught around the waist or by the back legs. Both situations are ones you want to avoid, as it is rough on the fur and the animals.

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    Default cool! Guess Im just unlucky for now...

    THANK YOU everyone as Ive been doing what ya'll have stated, except Ive been walking in the trail made by the Fox...NOw On one set Id di come in at a 90 degree angle of my own trail and thats the only one that was tripped by a Fox, but we had wet snow that night and my snare froze up and the tracks went right thru the snare

    Oh! and BTW Mr 54" (VInce) my loops are about 7-9 inches and oh! Id say 4-5 Inches off the ground. Maybe that explains the dead hares I had ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel in Ak View Post
    THANK YOU everyone as Ive been doing what ya'll have stated, except Ive been walking in the trail made by the Fox...NOw On one set Id di come in at a 90 degree angle of my own trail and thats the only one that was tripped by a Fox, but we had wet snow that night and my snare froze up and the tracks went right thru the snare

    Oh! and BTW Mr 54" (VInce) my loops are about 7-9 inches and oh! Id say 4-5 Inches off the ground. Maybe that explains the dead hares I had ?

    Prolly, and over there watch out for neighbors cats....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Default Snaring fox

    Daniel,
    Huntress mentioned she catches them in her sno-go trail and that reminded me of another tip. Even though I try to stay off the established fox trails and off their tracks when setting snares, I have often snared them in trails I have made through the brush using snowshoes. Like every other creature, they will normally take the path of least resistance, even when it is a trail you pack down just for snaring! Good luck and don't give up!

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    Thumbs up

    If you have driveways with culverts, try hanging your snares on either end. They like holes.
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    Another thing that I would suggest is to go to Trapperman.com and get yourself registered, then go to the forums area, then go to "Wilderness Trapping and Living" forum, that is where all the Alaska guys and gals hang out. More trapping info there than you could ever hope to digest. Also go to the archive area and do a search for fox trapping techniques. Best trapping information resource on the web as far as I'm concerned.

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    Oh..I assumed he was asking if he should USE a scent...like a gland lure or urine...

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    Default who? Me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Huntress View Post
    BUT, what about these folks I have seen setting sets with a cigarette in their mouths and STILL catch stuff?
    I prefer cigars. Used to be a fanatic about scent....now not so much. I'll live w/my results w/a lip full of Kodiak or a nice cigar:

    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

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    Yup! You are one of em!...I take so much time being so careful about scent and here you are with a catch I'd only dream of..


    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan22 View Post
    I prefer cigars. Used to be a fanatic about scent....now not so much. I'll live w/my results w/a lip full of Kodiak or a nice cigar:

    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Nice batch of furs you have alaskan22..
    I am in serch por a great fox lure do you have a favorite one.
    As far as hideing our sent you can never be to carefull. If you trap where theres alot of people there is a higher percent of trapwise critters. It seems i have had better luck when it is more remote.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matsuthunder View Post
    As far as hideing our sent you can never be to carefull. If you trap where theres alot of people there is a higher percent of trapwise critters. It seems i have had better luck when it is more remote.
    My experience has been the opposite. If a fox or yote comes calling to my yard, I can usually have them caught, within a few hours or overnight at most. Their guard is down and they feel perfectly at ease. If I go out on the line, it usually takes two or three days to nail one. I have never tried to mask my human scent, so I can't make comparisons on that aspect.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Default lure/scent

    If I had a favorite lure or scent for fox, I'd say urine. Something about it allows them to think "all is well" when they find fresh urine. Kind of lets their guard down and then they aren't so nervous knowing another canine has been there, or maybe they are eager to remark the territory. Who knows.

    As for specific lures for a set, I don't really have any. Use lots, from K9 gland lures (Dobbins Lures), to loud skunky Gusto (Minn trapline products), all the way down to just some ground up beaver castor.
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan22 View Post

    Looks like a little silverback gorilla there next to the stretcher: do you get him to do the skinning for you?

    NICE wall o' fur!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Default Snares.

    Do you recommend that you boil your snares?

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