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Thread: WSM recoil

  1. #1
    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Question WSM recoil

    For those of you that have shot multiple WSM calibers, how do they compare? Is there noticeable difference in recoil between the 270, 300, 325, etc? I am not so worried about recoil for hunting, but I would like to get a rifle that is fun to go "plinking" with (just becuase I enjoy reloading so much) and bench shooting isn't as fun if I'm getting beat up all day. What do you folks think?

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    Default Recoil

    I've got a Tikka T3 Lite in 300wsm and my buddy has a 270wsm in the same rifle. I would say his 270 kicks less...probably due to the lighter bullet he's shooting out of it. He had loaded 140gr TSX's, so an even lighter bullet and charge may not be too bad on recoil. As it is right now, it's still a lot more kick than I'd want for a plinker.
    When I've worked up loads for my 300wsm I usually start mid way between the min and max loads. I can usually tell a noticeable difference in kick between my starting and max load. Soooo, if you can find an accurate load around the starting charge weight, the recoil really may not be that bad.
    If you're looking for a plinker, check out a 6.5x55. Another buddy has one of these and it's a blast to shoot! You could sit there all day shooting. His has a laminated stock and a slightly heavier than standard barrel. Or how about a plain jane .308? The same friend picked up an ol beat up Rem 700 in 308 at a pawn shop for the action to build a project gun and the darn thing shoots so well he may just leave it as is. Or another plinker suggestion may be a .243 Winchester.

  3. #3

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    I think there's a lot of value in plinking with the same gun you hunt with. I'm no fan of getting beat up all the time or the high cost of powder. Therefore I work up reduced loads for all my rifles, often with cast bullets. They're great small game loads as well. You don't have to get into bullet casting to do it- there are lots of custom casters around, including several in Alaska. Between the huge savings in bullet costs and much smaller powder charges, you can shoot a whole lot more for a whole lot less money, even as you aren't getting pounded.

    Interesting enough, in about half my rifles these reduced loads hit just about dead on at 50 yards when the gun is sighted in normally with my heavy hunting loads. Therefore I always carry a few rounds of the reduced loads on big game hunts for shots at small game. Nice addition to camp meat or consolation on days when the main game doesn't cooperate. Another big advantage for cast bullets in your reduced loads- You can spot them at a glance, so there's no way to mistake them for your full-powered loads.

  4. #4

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    My plinking gun is a Savage S/S .204 Ruger. The difference in recoil is marginal between the 270WSM and the 325 WSM. I have shot all three of the WSM's you listed and I own own a 300 WSM ( I also had a 325WSM but sold it) and they all have the kind of kick associated with short Magnums. None of them are brutal to shoot, but plinking guns to me are ones with hardly any recoil at all but adequate velocity to do some serious killing. Just depends on how you define plinking and what you are plinking at I guess.

  5. #5
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    Default WSM recoil.

    I have a 7mm WSM and a 325 WSM. The 7 has less felt recoil with the same bullet weight (160) than my 7 Rem Mag. The 325 has less than my 338 and is about like my 06 featherweight (pre 64) with no pad. A lot of felt recoil depends on loads, type of pad, muzzle brake or not, and weight of rifle. With a brake and a Sims pad the 270 WSM should be fairly tame.

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    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the good info. Maybe I should clarify a bit further...I am mainly looking for a gun for sheep and 'bou, but one that is also fun to shoot at the range. I was leaning towards the 270 WSM, but then thought, "why not go with the 325 WSM, unless it is a mule?" My thinking was that if I went with the 325 then I could get by without the 338 WM. More guns is better, but you know how budget constrains are. In general, what would you say is the difference in felt recoil between the 270 WSM and the 270?

  7. #7

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    Ripper recoil is such a subjective topic that its hard to say. To me I can shoot a 270Win or a 270WSM all day long. For a big game rifle that is soft on recoil the 270 is a good choice and is what I bought my 9 year old son for his first rifle. He can easily shoot an entire box of 270 ammo and never complains of recoil and he ways 85lbs.I would also look at something like a 7mm-08. My Kimber Montana in 300WSM perceivably (to me) kicks a lot less than a equally light 300WM, but thats just me. I can shoot an entire box plinking at targets at 250+ at the range with my Kimber and not be affected by recoil at all. So really recoil is different to all of us.

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    Moderator Snyd's Avatar
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    Default

    Here's what posted about my 325 wsm a few months ago. I will add that since it is such a light gun it has some muzzle jump but it is on it's way back from being mag-na-ported, that should help that.


    Well I went out and shot the 325 today for the first time. 200 grain winchester accubonds. The gun with the VXIII 2.5-8x36 Leupold weighs 7lbs 2oz. It kicks more than my old Ruger M77 30.06 obviously but I tell you what... it doesn't feel like it on the shoulder. With the stock design and the pachmeyer deexcelerator recoil pad it soaks it up pretty good. I shot 20 rounds and my shoulder does not feel a thing. I used to hurt after running 10 180 gr rounds through the Ruger M77. From a recoil stand point I'd rather shoot the 325. No lie.
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    Default

    Alaskacub, have you ever shot an M1A or an M-14? If so, how would you compare the recoil from your 300 WSM to them?

  10. #10

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    I have never shot an M1A but I have shot a M-14, believe it was a .308. The M-14 is night and day different from my Kimber, weighs more less powder than the 300 WSM cant really compare them, the Kimber in 300WSM kicks a lot more than an M-14.

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    Default

    Hi Alaskacub, thanks for the reply. Of course the M1A is a semi-auto copy of the M-14, I imagine the recoil would be about the same. The reason I asked is because a salesman in a gunshop told me his Savage 300 WSM had about the same amount of recoil as his match grade M1A. Sounded kind of fishy to me.

  12. #12

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    I would suspect the weight of the rifle has some variance on this. My Kimber all up with scope is just a hair over 7 lbs, although never firing an M1A I have held one and the barrel alone is pretty heavy. The weight of any gun is the single most adjustable factor that will either reduce or increase the felt recoil. A buddy of mine had a 375 H&H in a Model 70, with scope it probably weighed near 9 1/2 lbs and it kicked less than my other buddies 338 WM which was a Tikka and only weighed 6 lbs 6 oz without scope. The weight of the gun is huge when it comes to recoil. the ergonomics of some stocks also help with perceived recoil as well.

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    Default WSM Kicks!!

    Ripper,

    I have shot all of the WSM calibers. Different guns with different stocks and different weight.

    The 270 WSM kicks the least, about like any 7 pound 270 Win.
    The 416 kicks the most. 350 grains at 2400 fps in a 8 pound rifle, about like a 375 H&H.

    Recoil can be calculated but certainly heavier guns recoil less. Stock design is a factor in felt recoil. Some stocks just make it easier on the shooter plus the judicious use of good recoil absorbing recoil pads help a lot.

    I have shot the 300 and 325 in the Kimber Montana rifles. I shot 60 rounds through 3 rifles (One 300 WSM and two 325 WSM's) in about two hours. No sore spots, my arm still worked. A can't really say there is any difference in recoil in these two calibers. The next day I shot 20 shots through a 416 Rem Mag and 20 through my 404 Dakota. Still no sore spots and my last group was 3/4" with the 404. The Dakota difinately has less recoil than the 416. Both are 400 grains at 2450 fps, both are about 8 1/2# but the stock design of the Dakota is better.

    Everything is relative. Find a friend with a caliber you want to try and buy the ammo. Do you wan't to shoot the 416 Alaskan Express? I have the ammo, just show up at high noon tomorrow.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  14. #14
    Member GreginAlaska's Avatar
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    Default

    When the salesman told me that his 300 WSM had the same kick as his M1A, I asked him how that could be. He said it was a stock rifle but for every foot pound of energy produced at the muzzle of a 24" barrel on a 300 WSM it takes 17 PSI of chamber pressure. He said it takes about 35 PSI of chamber pressure on a 300 WM. Is that possible?

    It'll be interesting to hear how Snyds 325 does after mag-na-porting.

  15. #15
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    Question Simple math...

    Quote Originally Posted by GreginAlaska View Post
    When the salesman told me that his 300 WSM had the same kick as his M1A, I asked him how that could be. He said it was a stock rifle but for every foot pound of energy produced at the muzzle of a 24" barrel on a 300 WSM it takes 17 PSI of chamber pressure. He said it takes about 35 PSI of chamber pressure on a 300 WM. Is that possible?
    The WSM and Win Mag operate at the same pressures and produce similar ballistics. The 300 Win Mag will out perform the WSM by about 100 fps or so with the 180 grain bullet.

    Depending on whose ballistics you subscribe to those two will give 2900 to 3100 fps with a 180 grain bullet. In my experience with it the 300 WSM is about at it's limit at 2900 fps. They both operate at about 65,000 psi.

    180 grain @ 2900 fps = 3378 ft/lbs = 19.24 psi/ft. lb.
    180 grain @ 3000 fps = 3615 ft/lbs = 17.98 psi/ft. lb.
    180 grain @ 3100 fps = 3860 ft/lbs = 16.83 psi/ft. lb.

    Looks like the Win Mag would win that. But there is no reason to even mention this the advantage of the WSM over the Win Mag is similar ballistics with less powder. The Win Mag uses 75 grains to get 3100 fps and the WSM uses 68.0 grains to get 2900 fps. The WSM uses 10% less powder to get 13% less muzzle energy. What is the advantage of the 300 WSM over the 300 Win Mag?

    I love sales clerks with third grade educations!
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  16. #16
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    What is the advantage of the 300 WSM over the 300 Win Mag?
    Great info Murphy. So then what IS the advantage of the wsm, if any? My guess (and just that, a guess) is that for very similar performance you can have less recoil and a lighter gun? Plus winchester has something new to sell but that's another thread!

    It seems the the 300wsm has really caught on. Can it all be attributed to marketing?

    What are your thoughts?
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Smile The Wonderful WSM

    Well, it certainly was maketed well. It has caught on so well because it's ballistics are very useful and fall in between the old '06 and the established 300 WM, with a promise of less recoil and nearing the Mag in performance. That is in good company. We could debate the merits of less recoil and comparable ballistics, but it no doubt is a very useful caliber. And the same could be said of the other WSM numbers. None of them are bad but we should view with suspicion the notion of better ballistics, less recoil and a lighter package.

    Our sales clerk is an example of the hype working, which in reality is responsible for many WSM sales.

    "Why, with this new WZZZM caliber you barely have to pull the trigger at all and the moose just falls over and starts to field dress its self."
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  18. #18

    Default wsm advantages (or why I hate my 300wsm)

    the real advantages of the short mags can most be appreciated by the mountain hunter. My 300wsm montana weighs 7lbs complete and has a 2" shorter barrel then a 300wm. Pack this rifle up a steep alder mountain side and you'll realize why these are significant attributes. Hunt from a treestand or raft and these features aren't important (but also aren't a drawback). I've come to begrudge my kimber montana 300wsm because it's eliminated any good excuses (too heavy, too long, not accurate, wood stock, mediocre ballistics) I had to buy a new rifle.

  19. #19
    Moderator Snyd's Avatar
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by kloshe View Post
    I've come to begrudge my kimber montana 300wsm because it's eliminated any good excuses (too heavy, too long, not accurate, wood stock, mediocre ballistics) I had to buy a new rifle.

    HAHA. I can relate. I too like my Kimber so far. Can't wait to get it back from mag-na-port, install new Talley lightweights and go shoot. I'll report on it after I do. Might be in the spring though unless we get a chinook!
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  20. #20

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    Me too kloshe, this Kimber Montana 300 whizzum I got is screwing me all up too, cant want something else to shoot. Snyd drop me a PM when your gonna go shoot your new MagnaPorted meat getter and I'll bring my Montana to shoot as well.

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