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Thread: Taking your dog along in the winter.

  1. #1
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default Taking your dog along in the winter.

    I would like to take my dog to the cabin and ice fishing this winter VIA snowmachine. It is too far for him to run. His dogbox is not insulated. How do people take their pets down to -20. I am thinking about building a 2 ski ice fishing box for him to ride in and to carry my gear.

    Thanks
    Mike

  2. #2
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Sorry no real anwers but I have seen pics of a guy logging in serious sled miles with his 70lb lab on his lap...

    I would like to see a sled/trailer setup too. Perhaps just a kennel or box in an Otter Sled?

  3. #3
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    our chessy, rides the wheeler seat fine. all the rest have willingly rode the sled behind the sno go when tired... make them a spot they can hold on and they will ride..

    ply wood with carpet.... short side to lean into works good.

    atv strap on seats are great...

    any thing they can brace themselfs too.. all mine love to go. and it is a LONG run to camp for them ( 26 miles one way )
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  4. #4

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    My 65 lb lab rides in front of me, butt on the seat and front paws on the fuel tank. It's a little tricky but at least she get's to go with me - most of the time. I have a 10' homemade Siglin sled but have not made her ride in that yet (in her kennel box). I suppose that would work if you went slow enough not beat the tar out of the pooch! Good luck.
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  5. #5
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default On the lap

    My shorthair rides on my lap inside a little half sleeping bag with a hole cut in it for her head. Ive logged hundreds of mile that way. When the going gets tough and I need to stand up she runs along in front or behind the sled. I have to keep an eye on her ears as they are not "cold weather dogs" but the heat blowing off the engine seems to keep them warm down the -20 or so. Ive tried the kennel in the Otter sled and that works ok, but its a pain in the butt to get them out when you come upon birds. On the lap works better.

  6. #6
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    I take the dog in a travel kennel with an insulated kennel cover. That forces me to pull a sled but that's usually helpful for other stuff. Unless the temps drop way below zero I leave the door rolled up so she can see out. I always point the door to the rear. No problems unless you take the dog powder busting. The kennel will fill up with snow but my dog seems to like it. In really cold temps I may add an insulated dog jacket and I always have a cushioned dog pad attached to the kennel bottom. I used velcro but I'm switching to snaps. Velcro gets clogged with snow. A friend uses friction fitted blue foam board for the bottom of his kennel and it seems to work well. Sportsman's Warehouse sells the insulated kennel covers. I don't hesitate to take the dog in any temps I'm willing to ride in.

  7. #7
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default Loose in the trailer...

    Our large lab (120 lbs) rides in an otter sled with a dog bed tossed on the floor of the sled allowing her to grip the bottom and cushion the bumps along the trail.
    She doesn't like it too much when I venture off the trail into the powder and "dust her" pretty good.
    On slow sections like thru the woods she hops off and leads down the trail putting on a few miles and keeping her warm. When we come to the open areas she hops in and we pick up the speed till we arrive at the cabin.
    Some days she'll run most of the 12 miles in.
    Ours did NOT like the kennel idea as we tried it initially. Also-keep in mind those plastic kennels become brittle when the temps get cold, FYI.
    BK

  8. #8
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    Here's my trailer with the kennel attached. I have several friends who do the same thing on a variety of different sleds. We all travel further than a dog can run at speeds that no dog could maintain. We've done it for years. My old dog didn't like it, but he was old. The new dog can't wait to jump in and go. If I'm working on a sled in the garage the dog climbs into that kennel and watches.
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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Mr Pid,
    How does that trailer suit you? Would you recommend it or one like it?

    Mike

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    I have an old ATEC with no suspension that I like better. This one needs the spring rate relaxed. Then it should work well. Suspended sleds are set up for a specific load weight. My loads vary. If I was doing it again I'd go with another no-suspension ATEC. I've tried several sleds and for going fast the ATECs are the best I've pulled. Best being they allow me to ride faster without hammering the dog.

  11. #11

    Default Taking the dog on the snowmachine

    I have an extremely short-haired jack russell (Toby) that is miserable if she can't go on the snowmachines when we take a ride. To keep her warm I crocheted her a 'snowsuit', kindof dumb looking but it sure does the trick. Makes her happy and keeps her from destroying something in the cabin because she's in a huff. Yes, I know, I could put her in her kennel in the cabin but something about her wanting to ride so bad is just plain irresistable. I'll try to load a picture of her here ... don't laugh please!
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    There's nothing to laugh at. Good for you! My wife used to take my old Samoyed, when he was a pup, in a baby snuggly and would wear one of my jackets to make room for the dog on her chest. He liked that arrangement but he out-grew it. We knew the drill since we used to take our infant daughter in the same way. She out-grew it, too!

  13. #13

    Default riding snowmachine with dog

    ... funny how both dogs & kids outgrow stuff; however, my pudgy jack russell is as big as she's going to get. Her belly doesn't know that though!
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    That's precious! You should have taken the dog out on Halloween! Great picture!

  15. #15
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    jlady - Great pics! I have a lab (mix) that would decide to bail out on a whim and could possibly hurt everyone around. He is going for rides in a box of some kind. He will learn to loadup and get in to stay warm when I am ice fishing or he will have to stay home.

    My chihuahua may ride in my coat though.

    Thanks!
    Mike

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