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Thread: Syn. vs. Lam.

  1. #1

    Default Syn. vs. Lam.

    Ok, we all know the pros and cons on each but when it comes down to weight, just how much are you saving? Does anybody know just how much weight you can save by going to a synthetic. Holding my laminated stock in hand by itself sure feels light and couldn't imagine saving much with a syn. Wondering if its really worth the money or just bed the one I have see where it ends up.

  2. #2
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Of course there are lots of variables in your question regarding synthetic stocks. As a baseline a Ruger laminated stock for a stainless 338 weighs 2lbs 3oz. A McMillan synthetic, sako style sporter weighs 1lb 9oz. Both with factory pads and swivel studs. If you are willing to spend around 400+$ then you can get a Brown Precision synthetic that weighs less than 1lb finished with a pad. Known as the kevlar "pounder". Of course, recoil will increase with a reduction in overall weight of the rifle, basic physics. Some of the laminates, like Rugers, are known to break out at the recoil lug on occasion, but that is usually repairable or preventable by bedding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    Of course there are lots of variables in your question regarding synthetic stocks. As a baseline a Ruger laminated stock for a stainless 338 weighs 2lbs 3oz. A McMillan synthetic, sako style sporter weighs 1lb 9oz. Both with factory pads and swivel studs. If you are willing to spend around 400+$ then you can get a Brown Precision synthetic that weighs less than 1lb finished with a pad. Known as the kevlar "pounder". Of course, recoil will increase with a reduction in overall weight of the rifle, basic physics. Some of the laminates, like Rugers, are known to break out at the recoil lug on occasion, but that is usually repairable or preventable by bedding.
    Well said GB.

    Probably going to save 10-12 oz on average and as GB mentioned you can get synthetics that weigh 16-24 ounces less than laminates. If you really want a laminated stock it can be lightened somewhat, but that always means less wood which means less strength. Synthetics can maintain their strength by using different materials. So with a synthetic you can have ultra light weight with strength comparable to that of a heavier weight synthetic stock.

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    It depends, on the rifle, and on what style stock you are buying. McMillan edge stocks are lightweight but there standard stocks are not, especially if you need "magnum fill".

    Generally people think the laminated stocks, such as the gray ones offered by Ruger are pretty heavy. Purchased a left hand Ruger 375 and it was stocked in the gray laminate. The laminate stock as it came from the factory weighs 38 ounces. The McMillan ordered for it weighs in at just shy of 41 ounces with the 1 inch deceralator pad. Weight in this caliber is not a bad thing so I was not disappointed. But if anyone would of asked me I would of bet the McMillan would weigh less, but it didnt.
    Tennessee

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    It depends, on the rifle, and on what style stock you are buying. McMillan edge stocks are lightweight but there standard stocks are not, especially if you need "magnum fill".
    I've had two McMillan Hunter's Edge stocks with 1/2" Decelerator pads and standard sling swivels inletted for Model 70 Fwts that each weighed 23 oz. I have a similar MPI stock that comes in right around the same weight. Several good gunsmiths have told me that the Edge stocks are good to go up to a 338 WM.

    All the laminated stocks I have owned have felt heavy and club like. I imagine if a person reshaped a laminate and milled some voids into the forearm channel and butt you could make it a lot handier.

  6. #6

    Default recoil

    Quote Originally Posted by Chisana View Post
    I've had two McMillan Hunter's Edge stocks with 1/2" Decelerator pads and standard sling swivels inletted for Model 70 Fwts that each weighed 23 oz. I have a similar MPI stock that comes in right around the same weight. Several good gunsmiths have told me that the Edge stocks are good to go up to a 338 WM.

    All the laminated stocks I have owned have felt heavy and club like. I imagine if a person reshaped a laminate and milled some voids into the forearm channel and butt you could make it a lot handier.
    Is this to say that some syn. stocks shouldn't be trusted past 338WM? I want to restock my 338 RUM which according to the nubers and some pros, hits the same if not harder than a 375. What's a guy to do?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dammlm View Post
    Is this to say that some syn. stocks shouldn't be trusted past 338WM? I want to restock my 338 RUM which according to the nubers and some pros, hits the same if not harder than a 375. What's a guy to do?
    For starters you should contact several stock makers. You can do it via email and get some direct quotes on weight and available patterns for your application or when you are serious about a purchase give them a call. I've always been treated well by McMillan, but there are other synthetic stock makers that know the business as well and I can personally recommend these:

    http://mcmfamily.com/mcmillan-stocks.php

    http://www.lonewolfriflestocks.com/stocks.html

    http://www.mpistocks.com/

    I've not used the High Tech stock or Brown Precision, but I've seen them on many rifles and know that they are a good product.

    http://www.hightech-specialties.com/index.html

    http://www.brownprecision.com/brown-...ion-stocks.htm

    I've no doubt left some fine stock makers out, but you can look at these websites and get an idea of what you want. Then send them an email or give them a serious inquiry call and go from there. There is some difference in price among these manufacturers, but you should figure 600-700$ for a complete stock bedded to your rifle from one of these companies. You can save a bit having a local gunsmith bed it or you can do it yourself, but the stock makers do excellent work.

  8. #8
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dammlm View Post
    Is this to say that some syn. stocks shouldn't be trusted past 338WM? I want to restock my 338 RUM which according to the nubers and some pros, hits the same if not harder than a 375. What's a guy to do?
    Certain very light synthetic stocks may not be the best choice for heavy recoiling rifles. Check with the stock makers mentioned in the previous post and they will get you squared away.

  9. #9
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    FWIW, most factory synethetic stocks are a joke. Some laminates are nice, but are heavier. Might as well spend the coin and get a McMillan. No second-guessing yourself with such a purchase.

    Or get a Bansner....

  10. #10
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    Default Magnum fill

    Some stock companies, MPI and McMillian to name a couple, recommend adding extra reinforcement in the recoil lug area for calibers above the 338 WM. They call this Magnum Fill, or at least thats what Lisa at MPI call it, they normally dont strengthen the recoil contact areas of the stock as much on a stock meant for a lighter caliber because it is unneccessary and it also adds weight.

    The MPI stocks are my favorites for lightweight and as far as getting something odd or different they can do about anything you can dream up. Just last week Lisa told me that they had done some Ambi Thumbhole Mannlicher style stocks for a few people and they also offer synthetics for guns like the Win 88 and 100, Savage 99 and just about any other action ever made, now where else are you gonna find stuff like that?

    The Bansners stocks are extremely strong and quite lightweight, although they look a little bulky to my eye. They are also reasonably priced. As far as strength I think that the Bansners is the stongest out there, I have seen a half ton Ford pickup backed over the butt of one and it didn't break, hows that for stout?

    The Mcmillian is a great product and pretty darn tough. But the wait is a long one and I have personally broken one, stupidity on my part but accidents happen and I did break it. They also seem overly bulky in some models to me but that is just how my eye sees them, your veiw may differ.

    I have owned several laminates and I really am not a huge fan. They have their place, but I find most of them to be a little on the bulky side and they normally are heavier than walnut or a quality synthetic, normally.

    So pick as you wish, its your rifle, I just thought i might add some of the things I have picked up in working with the various different brands and styles of synthetic stocks.

  11. #11
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Kid View Post
    The MPI stocks are my favorites for lightweight and as far as getting something odd or different they can do about anything you can dream up.
    MPI is very good to work with. They would stock my 1903 Springfield Scout when McMillan would not touch a 1903. I recently had that stock modified and Doc was great to work with.

    McMillan's wait time seems to have shortened a bit recently. My last Hunter's Edge ordered late in 2008 took 4-5 months. Another ordered this summer took two.

  12. #12
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    My 300 ultra mag sits in a McMillan edge stock. Plenty tough enough, and very light.

    And I don't mind waiting a little extra for the best stock out there....

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