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Thread: Wrangell Fishing??

  1. #1
    Member Gundog's Avatar
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    Question Wrangell Fishing??

    I am starting to plan my next year’s AK vacation. I trailer my own boat up and spend 2 + weeks fishing each summer I take 3 weeks off. Last year we went to Craig and 2 years before that Ketchikan.

    The trip to Craig had some problems (truck broke down then weather) and I am thinking I would like to see some more of this great State so I am thinking Wrangell possibly if not I will go back to Ketchikan.

    We dry camped for 2 weeks on POW Island and that sucked so next summer will be at a lodge unless I take my truck camper like the first year to Ketchikan where we had hookups.

    I liked Craig but we got blown off the water the last week we were there just bad luck I guess but it is expensive to get there and to not be able to get out for a week well just doesn't work when you spend that much. I have been doing some calculating and the trip to Wrangell would cost less than it did to Craig by ferry. How is the fishing around Wrangell I can plan the trip for any month in the summer?

    Last year I took a 21' NR Seahawk with 3 other guys and it was way to crowded I sold that boat and I am having a new Wooldridge 26' SS pilot House boat built. I have always trailered up to Prince Rupert BC and ferried from there. I am toying with the idea of launching the boat in Prince Rupert and piloting up this year. I calculated 186 miles and I should have the range easily the new boat will have a 150 gallon tank and be ran with a 250 HP Yamaha. I should get between 2-3 MPG I can always stop off in Ketchikan if I need more fuel. The ferry will run me around $1800 to Wrangell and probably $1200 to Ketchikan round trip.

    This looks like a big piece of open water between Rupert & Ketchikan I have a fair amount of experience offshore off the Oregon coast but never anything this far. The Ferry trip across to Ketchikan has never been too bad during my crossings but I know how things can change. I would definitely look the weather forecast over but I would think I could cross it faster than the ferry if the weather is favorable. What do you think about this crossing in a 26'er?

    Are there any places in or around Wrangell that have RV hookups? I am not sure with my new boat if I will still be able to haul my truck camper it maybe too much weight for the truck now I will have to see, if there are no hookups I won't bother anyway.

    Thanks for any info you may have.

    Mike

  2. #2

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    Wrangell is a great place to fish. You can be on good fish 10 minutes from the harbor. You never really get blown out by weather and we have the salmon derby also witch is fun. There is one place in town with rv hook ups. If you need some info just ask.

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    Member Gundog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanap View Post
    Wrangell is a great place to fish. You can be on good fish 10 minutes from the harbor. You never really get blown out by weather and we have the salmon derby also witch is fun. There is one place in town with rv hook ups. If you need some info just ask.
    I would like some info on the RV park and also what time of year is good for Kings I think I read once they have a terminal fishery with generous limits on hatchery fish? How is the Halibut & rock fishing around there? How about a lodge with a dock that would not mind me bringing my own boat? Maybe something close to a public dock could work also.

    Thanks Mike

  4. #4

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    The rv park is owned by Alaska Waters. There is no lodge with a dock but finding a place to park your boat wont be a problem and every thing is close the docks. Kings come in late april but the best is mid may through june. There is good halibut and rock fish fishing also. I think you would really enjoy it here. There is alot more than fishing too. There is the Anan bear observatory and the Stikine river.

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    Hi Mike,

    We've crossed the Dixon Entrance from PR to Ketchikan several times, first in a 22' C-Dory and more recently in a 26' Bounty 257. It's about 85 nautical miles by the shortest route. Definately do-able in a small boat, but you sometimes have to wait for the right weather conditions, in either direction. Most often we've been able to cross within 1-2 days of when we were ready to go. You will have RADAR, right?

    Some excerpts from my book "Cruising in a Big Way" that might be of some use:

    Where to Launch?

    If you want to cruise only SE Alaska, Prince Rupert is a great place to launch. PR is only about 35 miles by water from the Alaska border, and it’s easy to reach by road (though the road is long). PR has supplies of all sorts, a good launch ramp, and even a place to store trailer and tow vehicle indoors.

    Rushbrook Marina, northeast of downtown PR past Cow Bay, is where much of the fishing fleet berths, and is often heavily rafted up. Launch at the Rushbrook ramp, and tie up briefly at the ramp’s courtesy dock. Ask the harbor office for access to the water hose (in their shed on the dock), and you can rinse truck and trailer right there near the top of the ramp. Park temporarily back along the road, and then run the boat down toward Cow Bay. If you need to fuel up, the Esso and Petro Canada docks are along the way. For a slip at the Prince Rupert Rowing and Yacht Club, call VHF 73 (you might want to call or drop in earlier and reserve a slip). PRRYC has clean rest rooms and showers, and friendly folks. It’s a fine place to stay until weather is good enough to head north across the Dixon Entrance.

    From PRRYC you can easily walk back to your truck and trailer, and take it to wherever it will be stored (not along the road). For indoor storage, call the Philpott-Evitt Do-It Center to make sure they have space for you, and arrange a time to arrive. If the Do-It Center’s space is full, outdoor storage is available from Four Seasons Maintenance and Storage.

    Update: the Do-It Center no longer does indoor truck/trailer storage. North Coast Storage does, however. See:

    http://listings.allpages.com/bc-0002...ce-rupert.html


    Crossing the Dixon

    Crossing the Dixon Entrance into Alaska is something like crossing the Queen – longer, but maybe a little less challenging. Check the weather forecast and current actual conditions, and pay attention to wind versus tidal current. Heading north from Prince Rupert, you might be surprised by how rough Chatham Sound can be when wind and current are opposed. Wind versus current at the outflow of the Portland Canal can also be a bear.

    If the forecast is decent, and conditions at both Green Island and the Central Dixon Entrance buoy are reasonable, it’s probably OK. What’s reasonable? For a small boat, winds less than 15 knots, and seas less than 1 meter. As with the Queen, there are anchorages that can break up the Dixon, including Brundige Inlet on Dundas Island, and Foggy Bay in SE Alaska. You are asked to call US Customs at (907) 225-2254 for an OK if you plan to stop in Foggy Bay rather than come all the way to Ketchikan after crossing the border.


    Southeast Alaska

    From Dixon Entrance up to the top of Glacier Bay, Southeast Alaska is another almost 400 miles in a straight line. It’s a huge, dramatic, and sometimes forbidding place. Scenery tends toward the spectacular, with tall snow-capped mountains, glaciers that reach down into the water, and lots of whales, sea lions, sea otters, eagles, and bears. Fishing can be really terrific, and whale-watching as well.

    Weather can be fairly terrific also. A keen non-stop watch on both forecast and actual conditions is advisable, pretty much everywhere in Southeast. Southeast has several long, wide, and straight channels that provide plenty of fetch for wind to work on the water. They can generate ferocious conditions for a small boat, particularly when wind and tide are opposed. A few that are worthy of particular attention: Clarence Strait, Chatham Strait, Stephens Passage, and Lynn Canal.

    There are so many beautiful anchorages – they’ll knock your socks off! But safe anchorages do tend to be somewhat further apart than down south. So when you’re planning the next leg of your trip, be sure to identify possible “bailout” anchorages along the way, in case the seas start getting beyond your comfort level. There are a few stretches where 20-30 miles or more must be traveled before the next anchorage, and this could offer enough time to kick up a nasty chop.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

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    Member Gundog's Avatar
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    Hi Richard,
    Thank you very much for taking the time to write that. It is a lot of good information.

    Thanks to you also AN for the local info. I usually start early planning a trip like this and all the info I can gather helps.

    Mike

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