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Thread: This dog won't "come"

  1. #1

    Default This dog won't "come"

    So, my pup is about 20 weeks old. She knows sit, come and is learning "heel". When I sit her down and tell her "come", she does. Now, when she gets something in her mouth and I tell her to "come", she runs around and won't come at all.

    I've given her a tongue lashing from hell, but it doesn't matter.

    Oh, and I've tried the "come girl, come girl" nice dog thing too. I actually tried the nice thing first, no luck. Any tricks out there??

  2. #2
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    not that i know much ... but with a .. well bonded dog .. just turn your back.. they will see and hear that you are upset with them ... they will come back (possible without the fetch) but if they have identified the object its easier for him to get.. then bring back ... start close and walk back ..

    just remember your not happy till he brings it to you.. then your REALLY happy..

    I could be wrong though... But this is what i have to do with my service dog...

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

  3. #3
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    4-5 month old pup = let's play keep away! I haven't had a pup yet that brought back any item on his/her own accord....LOL

    This is perfectly normal behavior for a puppy of this age. Actually it is a good thing, in my book. It means the pup has prey drive...

    So, now that you know she likes 'her' toys (she thinks they are hers), you have to use other methods to teach her to come back to you...I prefer the tried and true method of the long line...Yep, the good old rope.... ...snap it on her collar and reel her in...running away or 'disappearing' behind the corner of a building can also work...

    When she gets back to you praise her up and let her hold the bumper for a minute...then repeat...distance does not matter...Once she gets the idea that you will throw the bumper again she will hopefully come back pretty consistently.

    Make sure that you do not scold her for not coming back, unless you actually go out and catch her as she is running off. (near impossible with a pup this age)...If you scold her after she comes back to you then she will associate the negative pressure with coming...not a good situation.

    If you are planning on force fetching her, this will be the time when she really and truly learns the routine of going to retrieve something and delivering to hand...for now I would continue to use the rope....

    Juli
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  4. #4

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    As mentioned... a long rope is a great tool. All my young dogs go on a long line until obedience is thorough.
    " Recall "..It all starts by walking at heel and then changing direction 180 degrees. Just before you change direction ...cue them with a verbal command. Either by name or a simple "here" or "heel" If they don't change direction with you ...you give a leash tug to get them to change in your direction to make them follow with you. After several lessons they learn to follow your lead and pay attention to your leg movements as to which direction you are going. This is how I get dogs started on coming when called. Once they come to you or your lesson is over you can reward with a treat. Usually as they come to you and sit in front of you.

    To prevent possessiveness and wanting to play the chase game...
    Again...use the long line. As the dog comes close to you grab the long line not the collar. Get on the ground at the dogs level and pull the dog to you. Do not reach for the retrieved object let them hold it. Command them to sit. Use the long line to reinforce if you have to. Once they sit 90% of the retrievers out there will drop the retrieved object at that time. Use the long line to prevent them from reaching for it again. Then you simply pick it up. They dropped the retrieved item on their own and didnt relate you as an object to take the item away. They are learning to trust you and you are developing a nice delivery habit.
    Now if you have one of the other 10% of the dogs that won't drop the retrieved item. Simply have two of the same object. Again use the long line to get them to you. Get them to sit. Then get them focused on the second object and go ahead and throw it out. They will spit out the one they have and want to get the other one.

    Later on, if you decide, force fetch is another great tool to fix retrieving issues. I like to use the above method first before force fetch. Again ..it gets the dog to trust me and I have found that it makes the process of force fetch a lot easier on me and the dog. Less stress the better.

    P.S. watch your tone while training. I wouldn't come to you either if you were yelling.

  5. #5
    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Do you plan to collar condition the dog?

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    Good advice given. The check cord is your friend! As dog trainers we don't want to issue a command we cannot enforce. And the command is not "Come! Come here girl! Come on! Come 'ere! Come here **** you!" The command is one word, just one word, and the correct response is for pup to come to you. Then the operative word is "Good!" Nothing like the power of the word "Goood!"

    Best of luck to both of you.

    Jim

  7. #7
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Default fourth for the long check cord

    My pup was on a 50ft check cord for most of her first year. Most folks do not use one this long but she had a longer distance keep away habit than most pups. In mid winter I attached a second 50ft section to keep distance control over her if she saw another dog or person and wanted to run over them.

    I use a simple yellow braided poly 3/8 or 1/2 rope from Ace Hardware. It is easy to splice a snap into with a fid. It is light weight and the dog can drag it all over in the snow. It floats as well.

    Another option is the 20 ft climbing gear rope pieces from REI. They are static cord about 9mm (3/8) and don't tangle as bad as other types of ropes. they are heavier than the braided poly. Their woven structure will absorb water more than the braided poly.

    Stay away from the e-collar until the dog is under control with a check cord and voice commands. It is the last tool to be used once all the learning is solid.

    I also had to switch to using a pinch collar to get the dog to heal on lead. Without that pressure and discomfort she would just drag me all over the yard.

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    Something else I failed to mention in my previous post is consistancy. You need to stick with this training stuff every time you tell the pup to come to you. If you only enforce the "come" command now and then, you can expect pup to comply now and then.

    You'll get to where you want to be. It just takes repetition. Good, solid foundation training (work) done now will make life easier for both of you for a long time...maybe even forever... but I doubt it.

    Best of luck.

    Jim

  9. #9

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    Thanks for the advice. I have been working with the check cord, things are better because she cannot get away, but she still won't give me the dummy back until I get her right by the collar.

    We will keep working hard. She seem to be calming down a little, but it's a slow process.

  10. #10

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    Have you tryed making her sit at your side with the bumper in her mouth as she returns. Use the lead as much as possible instead of grabbing the collar. If she doesn't spit out the bumper when you tell her to sit then use another to tease her with. Toss that one out. She will instantly spit out the one she has or she will allow you to take it from her with little coaxing because she at that point is focused on the other one.

  11. #11
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    I'll second Wetlands "two dummy" method, but you have to watch the dog's behavior about the second dummy. I have to keep the second one hidden or she will drop the first one on the return and think the second is some kind of fun bumper and start acting up.

    The narrow bumpers fit in a back pants pocket, but the larger canvas ones won't. You may need a nail bag or something to hide the second one in.

  12. #12
    Member rrjfish8's Avatar
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    Default run away

    go to a baseball park or a finced yard, run from her she will come to you. Then make her heel

  13. #13
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default rewards / commands

    Are you using a command when she is to the point where you want her to drop the bumper?
    I've done a couple things, one was when I gave the command to drop & she does I gave her a treat / reward. No drop no treat. The other thing I did when she didn't drop on the command was to give her ear a small pinch. In fact I really don't even have to pinch the ear just the fact that I start to grasp it would get her to drop it immediately.
    However if you plan on force fetching I don't know if I would do this as it is common to use the pinch to get the dog to open & insert the bumper with the fetch command.
    Being that I have a pointer & didn't FF her or use an e-collar the occasional grasp on the back of the ear between the thumb & fore finger always gets her to obey what ever command she is trying to ignore.

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