Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Anyone make a tipi?

  1. #1
    Member hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    221

    Default Anyone make a tipi?

    I would like to get one of the Ti Goat Tipis but don't want to pay the big bucks. I was toying with the idea of making one on the sewing machine. The problem is I don't know the dimensions of how to cut the fabric. I have found a source of Sil Nylon that seems to be a good price. I can get factory 2nd for half the price and think it would be a good idea if I screwed up the first one I wouldn't have as much invested.

    Has anyone made their own?

    My Idea is to sew a piece together in about a 10x10 dimension and then use a string and marker to make a semi circle, bring the two straight edges together and sew a zipper on them. Of course I'd have to reinforce the peak for the pole with cordura or something similar and sew on tie outs around the circumference and a few half way up.

    Anyone got a Ti Goat tipi and have any idea on the dimensions?

  2. #2

    Default

    I have not sewn one but if you pick your diameter and calculate the circumference . Then decide how many panels you want and how tall you should arrive at the dimensions for each panel. Leave a little extra for seam allowances. Does that make sense,,,is it any help?
    Where are you finding the sil-nylon seconds if you don't mind sharing the source?


    PS I have a tipi from here http://www.wyominglostandfound.com/ that I will be trying out this year. I made a small woodstove for it and am working on a stainless steel roll up chimney.

  3. #3
    Member hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    221

    Default 2nds

    http://thru-hiker.com/materials/coated.php

    http://www.owfinc.com/Fabrics/NylonW...stop.asp#Nylon

    The way i was thinking and the way that Ti Goat appears to do it would be to have one seam that went side ways across the tent. Hard to tell from the photos on thier website but seems it would be much easier than making 8 seperate triangular sections.

  4. #4

    Default

    I checked the pics at the site and didn't see a sideways seam. To my thinking a sideways seam is an increased risk of leakage. Thank you for the link for the fabrics!!!

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    867

    Default

    How about getting some vis-queen ( sp) and duct tape and making a template? You can even errect it to see if you are getting what you want. Just my idea, I am a visual kinda guy and can wrap my brain around what I can see.

    George

  6. #6
    Member hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    221

    Default Template

    Good idea Ive got some visquine in the garage.

    As far as the seams leaking I think every one who makes tents out of silnylon recomends sealing the seams with silicone anyway, and If I overlap it in the correct direction, water should roll right over it.

  7. #7
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default horizontal seem

    The integrity of the tipi is held intact by the guy lines pulling it tight to the single center pole. A horizontal seem will degrade the structural soundness of the design. I have some horizontal seems in my Kifaru - because of rips and tears - and you have to sew them up good or they will re-tear.

    Silnylon is a pain to sew the stuff is slippery.

  8. #8

    Default I've made 2

    Guys,

    About a year or so ago I made a couple of tipis. One is in between size of the kifaru 4 and 6 man and the other bigger one is sized between the 8 and 12 man kifaru. I didn't know a lick about sewing but figured it out and it was actually not too hard. The laying out part is mostly a geometry thing. Mine are actually more of a hex design. Esentially you cut the fabric into big triangles, sew them into bigger triangles then conect them all together, sew in big #10 zippers, and the stove jack. I did reinforce the top and ends. Also sewed in attachements for guy lines on the outside and drying lines for the inside. Let me know if any of you are more interested in the actual design and I can dig up some of the dimensions.

    First pic is the smaller one. I can stand fully upright in the very middle. Works great for backpacking with me and my two boys.

    second pic is the bigger one. This tent is perfect for 3 guys and gear on a float trip. With two guys its luxury living. I think the center point is 10' or so.

    I really like the floorless design. You are in touch with the earth and never have to worry about mud/water/etc on the floor!

    Rick
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9

    Default

    It look like you did an excellent job Rick!! Especially for a non sewer. A couple of questions
    1. What fabric did you use?
    2. General demensions?
    3. What size/type woodstove?
    Thanks for sharing.

  10. #10

    Default Tipi specifics

    Material- SilNylon( I found it in discount bins for a $1 a yard at walmarts in virginia when I was TDY. I've looked here in AK a few times but have not seen any of it around home. Other places that sell all of the goods like the silnylon and the zippers and other roll goods are either outdoor wilderness fabrics or thru-hiker.

    I named them based on the dimensions of each hex side and each tipi is essentially a hex shaped pyramid. I played around with 8 sided designs as well for a more rounded shape but really just more sewing with not that much more room.

    The Hex 5
    sides- 5'
    height in middle- 6'
    floor dimensions- 10' x 8'8"

    The Hex 8
    sides-8'
    height in middle- 10'4"
    floor dimensions- 16' x13'10"

    tips for construction

    Some of your planning factors are related to the fabric size since it is about 60'' wide you are kind of limited with that for your start. from their you cut them up into big triangles, join them together and then join the panels together.

    Add about .37" per foot for sewing seam shrinkage. So if you plan your panels and don't add for this your overall length will be off after sewing.

    once you lay out the big triangles use a glue stick to join where you plan to sew them together. This keeps the slippery silnylon from moving around too much.

    Play with the tension on the sewing machine until it doesn't pucker the fabric too much. it also helped to pull it along while sewing the seam.

    Use little baby triangles of pack cloth or cordura on the stress points at the top where your pole goes into the cone, at the guy line tie in points, and the stake holds.

    bone up on some basic geometry rules for triagles and dimensions within hexagons to figure out your slope lengths. I found a site like math.com or something like that to jog the memory bank.

    A good plan would be to get the feel of sewing this stuff would be to make some stuff sacks or a little tarp tent for bivy options.

    I did alot of searching around the web and if you look around there are some good sites with instructions for a variety of gear. Some sites give good sewing tips like how the seams are supposed to look and how to sew zippers together (tricky but doable).

    The stoves I got from Titanium Goat. I got the little box one for the small tipi and the big box one for the bigger tipi. They also sold me the stove jack material to sew into the top. great little stoves. The pole is a little tricky to get rolled out the first few times but gets easier once you burn some time into it. I splurged on these and went the cheap route on the tipis. I think both of the tipis materials only cost about 200 bucks.

    The great thing is the size and weight savings with these tipis and the packable stoves.

    Pitching is a little tricky but I followed the kifaru instructions on their website and modified it by trial and error for my sized tipis.

    the pole for the little one is a smaller collapsible pole from another tent of mine and the bigger one uses dip net pole pieces broken down into 4 pieces.

    thats all I can think of right now. fire away if you have any questions.

    Rick

  11. #11

    Default

    Hey Rick
    Thanks you for taking the time to write up all the info on the tents! Another project to add to my list : ) I need to get some silnylon to practice on to see how tough it is to sew.
    Thanks again!!

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    161

    Default Sil Nylon

    I saw this thread and broached the sudject of a tipi style tent to my wife for backpacking and she bought into it (since she is going to make it that is a good thing). I have been doing a little reading on Sil Nylon and apparently there are two types. Type 6 and type 66 nylon. The type 66 is much stronger and rated for parachutes and hot air balloons.

    Wasn't sure if this would be a consideraton in your application.

    Regards,

    Jeff

  13. #13
    Member hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    221

    Default Thanks

    Much thanks for the info that is exactly what I am interested in making, about a 10 ft diameter one to start and then possibly a bigger one later on with more room. I was going to try an 8 panel but may have just changed my mind to a 5. I have mocked up an 8 panel using scaled panels cut form notebook paper.

    What is the length of the panel on the short side and lenght of the panel from the short side to the apex at a right angle?

    Is yours vented at the top? I was thinking a two way zipper so I could unzip at the peak to vent if needed.

  14. #14
    Member RainGull's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    The S.E. of the N.W.
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Haven't read the responses, but if you cut each length diagonally and then stitch the two pieces back to back to get an even triangular piece and then piece together several of those pieces you will come up with a tipi with minimal waste (waste increasing as your circumference increases). Not sure how wide and long the nylon you are buying is, but it wouldn't be difficult to figure out your angles with a little simple Trig/Geom (or cheat with an online triangle solver something like this).
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

  15. #15
    Member .338-06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,045

    Default

    I've always thought that the tipis were more of a cone shape, made up of a series of triangle shaped panels. I'd look up formulas for cones and plan material sq yds accordingly.

  16. #16

    Default Much better pitching option.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick in Fairbanks View Post
    Pitching is a little tricky but I followed the kifaru instructions on their website and modified it by trial and error for my sized tipis.



    Rick
    Great looking tipis. Plus you saved a bundle over buying one. I own a 8 man Kifaru and thought I would share some advice for pitching. First off the Kifaru instructions just make me pist off and frustrated so I come up with a system that I believe works much better. Heres how to do it. First set up your tipi at home taking time adjusting the stakes to have the perfect pitch. Second, take the tipi down leaving all the stakes in the ground. Third, measure, find the center, and put a stake in the middle of the tent stakes. Forth, Use a string or webbing with a hole in it connected to the stake in the middle and go around the circumference marking all the stake positions. The next time you set up your tipi simply put the string and stake in the center of were you want your tipi and use the sting/webbing as a guide for the diameter of the tipi. perfect pitch every time in less time.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slow reflection View Post
    Great looking tipis. Plus you saved a bundle over buying one. I own a 8 man Kifaru and thought I would share some advice for pitching. First off the Kifaru instructions just make me pist off and frustrated so I come up with a system that I believe works much better. Heres how to do it. First set up your tipi at home taking time adjusting the stakes to have the perfect pitch. Second, take the tipi down leaving all the stakes in the ground. Third, measure, find the center, and put a stake in the middle of the tent stakes. Forth, Use a string or webbing with a hole in it connected to the stake in the middle and go around the circumference marking all the stake positions. The next time you set up your tipi simply put the string and stake in the center of were you want your tipi and use the sting/webbing as a guide for the diameter of the tipi. perfect pitch every time in less time.
    Here is a diagram. Note that my 8 man only requires 3 different diameters for all ten stakes. Start at any stake and work your way around the tipi back to the starting point and install the pole.

  18. #18

    Default great idea for pitching distance

    slow reflection,

    I like your idea about using the center point and string method. I will definately try that.

    I think it should eliminate the slop and staking and restaking working towards a tighter pitch.

    One question- I get your point and diagram about various lengths out to the stakes but how do you space out the distance from stake to stake. Like when you stake the first one and then move over to stake 2 how do you space that out.

    I'm guessing you would get your four initial corner stakes in and then equally space the other ones between? Or do you measure your tipi sides and already know the distance? The only trouble I see with that is if you error around the circle you might get out of whack when you get around to the last stake.

    great discussion

    Rick

  19. #19

    Default

    start at any point and work your way around using the tipi as your spacing guide.

  20. #20
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    I had a 16' for camping that I bought in 1980 and over the years have built 4 total. Funny what you learn when your best childhood friends are Navajos, Pimas, and Mandans. I lived in my 26' for 3 years through Flagstaff Arizona winters, 6’ deep snow, -20f nights and all. To my amazement it stood to 100+mph wind with just ten 12" nails holding it down, wind acutely makes down force on a tipi that’s made right.

    A plains tipi pattern is a true half circle with the smoke flaps added to and the door cut from the flat side. All seams should run parallel to the flat side so when erected they run at an angle making water follow them down to the front. It is not a true cone when set because the flat sides overlap and pin together making the cone lean to the back (west) some.

    Heavy ripstop nylon is the best stuff I have found for larger tipis (so you don't need a crane to pitch it) and 20oz untreated canvas for smaller ones, the woodsmoke from the fire waterproof treats it without rotting it.

    You need an inner wall (liner) as tall as you are and a partial ceiling (ozan) inside so the smoke will draft while keeping heat where you are. The outer wall does not touch the ground but the inner does allowing air to draft up between them taking the smoke out.

    It's hard to explain but easy to do, here are some links I googled just now.

    http://www.shelterpub.com/_shelter/www_teepee.html

    http://www.tipis.org/images/laubinti.jpg
    http://www.tipis.org/images/crafts286.jpg
    http://www.tipis.org/images/CatP6_4se.jpeg
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •