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Thread: Looking for info on boats for SE Alaska

  1. #1
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    Default Looking for info on boats for SE Alaska

    Moved from MN a year ago and am getting boat fever. What kind of boat has the best quality and is most ecconomical to run in salt water. We are looking for something with a cabin to sleep at least 4. Have been looking at some 28' Bayliners. Just need some opinions.

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Bayliner 2859 is a good one if you want to sleep 4. Not much fishing space (fine with 2 or 3 rods). I have 2 friends with 2859s
    Last edited by Sobie2; 10-28-2009 at 15:27. Reason: extra thought

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    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    Although Bayliner gives you a fair amount of boat for the money, I don't consider them to be of the "best quality." For that, you'll need to pay a little more.

    Among the more common quality fiberglass boats that are popular where I live (Juneau) are SeaSports, Ospreys, C-Dorys and probably one or two others I'm overlooking right now. Popular aluminum boats include NorthRiver, Boulton and Hewescraft.

    Really depends on how much you want to spend, and what features you're looking for.

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I'd add Uniflite, Glasply, and Tollycraft to the mix between that and bhollis you've got the brands covered that have staying power here in Southeast.

    Sleeping 4 is the challenge though I saw in the original post.

    Lots of Bayliners around here though, and their "quality issues" aren't really an issue. There are 3 bayliners in town that are used by the USCG auxillary... and two are 2859s. Lots of old ones around as well. Also the most common boat in Southeast for the last 35 years (except a 16' lund) is the Bayliner Trophy.

    BTW I don't own a Bayliner. And I am not picking a fight with bhollis.

    Bottom line, those are the brands that are popular here in Southeast. Clifftonallen, what ever you are looking at, even if you are paying cash, since you are not from here and looking at a big boat get it surveyed and they can tell you if the boat is ready for the water, safe, and going to hold up to the seas.

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    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    Sobie2,

    Don't really disagree with anything you say. Didn't mean to suggest that a Bayliner is a bad choice, or somehow isn't suitable for Southeast Alaska. On the contrary, they seem to be a very affordable, and very popular way to get out on the water, and that's what's it's all about.

    But, that said, there's a reason Bayliners cost less than some of the other boats mentioned above, and I think it's fair to say that the reason has to with quality--quality of materials and equipment, and quality of craftsmanship. Does that make the Bayliner a bad boat, or an unsafe or unseaworthy boat? No. It just means that the windows might be more likely to leak, or the fit and fit finish might not be as nice, or it might not ride as well as some of the others boats mentioned, or some of the equipment might be more prone to failure, etc., etc.

    In short, it's like anything else--you get what you pay for.

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    I think the used Bayliners are about the most bang for your buck you can get in a boat. I have been out on a 24' one, and it seems like a reasonable boat for a very good price. I think you could expect quite a but more out of am Osprey or Parker, but you will pay a lot more money for it. Another thing I would look at is what they are powered by. If it is an I/O, I would look at Diesel over gas for safety, longevity and economy.

    Jim
    2009 Seawolf 31'
    www.seawolfmarine.com
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    Default Reply:

    Thanks for sharing the information.It is definitely going to help me some time.

    Credit Cards

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    Bayliners have always been an entry level boat.

    But in todays market, I'd be looking for a used Seasport with a diesel and a Volvo-Penta duo-prop.

    Lot's of deals out there, as many of the charter guys who survived switched to aluminum a couple years back, and the rest are bailing due to bad economic times.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    What are the most important factors to you in a boat? Is sleeping comfort most important? Is fuel efficiency? Is toughness? Is the deckspace for fishing important? Ability to handly sever water? Stableness when fishing? Will you ever need to beach the boat?

    Everything in boat design is a tradeoff, so the best boat for one situation isn't the best for another. Are your tyipcal trips 3-5 days with the occasional day trip, or will you mostly use it for day trips with the occasional multiday trip? You really need to nail down how you plan to use the boat before jumping into one.

    The guy who uses his boat for hard core fishing and hunting will have a totally different opinion of what the best boat is, than the guy that is looking for a floating RV. Neither guy is wrong, they just have different needs and gear what they use towards their use.

    I forgot to add, how fast do you want to go, and what range do you need for the trips you will be making. There are some very efficient displacement hulls that have small diesel inboards that get great fuel efficiency. But many folks (especially day use folks) can't live with a hull that cruises at 9 knots and wot is 12 knots. And efficiency can be greatly swayed by purchase price, if you can get a boat that burns 20-30% more fuel for $20k less than the more efficient boat, the less efficient less expensive boat may be less expensive when you factor in all costs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    What are the most important factors to you in a boat? Is sleeping comfort most important? Is fuel efficiency? Is toughness? Is the deckspace for fishing important? Ability to handly sever water? Stableness when fishing? Will you ever need to beach the boat?

    Everything in boat design is a tradeoff, so the best boat for one situation isn't the best for another. Are your tyipcal trips 3-5 days with the occasional day trip, or will you mostly use it for day trips with the occasional multiday trip? You really need to nail down how you plan to use the boat before jumping into one.

    The guy who uses his boat for hard core fishing and hunting will have a totally different opinion of what the best boat is, than the guy that is looking for a floating RV. Neither guy is wrong, they just have different needs and gear what they use towards their use.

    I forgot to add, how fast do you want to go, and what range do you need for the trips you will be making. There are some very efficient displacement hulls that have small diesel inboards that get great fuel efficiency. But many folks (especially day use folks) can't live with a hull that cruises at 9 knots and wot is 12 knots. And efficiency can be greatly swayed by purchase price, if you can get a boat that burns 20-30% more fuel for $20k less than the more efficient boat, the less efficient less expensive boat may be less expensive when you factor in all costs.
    good advice/input
    but i want one of all the above

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