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Thread: Another Sea Duck question

  1. #1
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default Another Sea Duck question

    With them being tough to bring down, what size shot and ammo should I use? I was thinking #2 Blackcloud.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  2. #2
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    Default Go...

    6-4, you'll get more pellets on them & a smaller size pellet as well...

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    Are the "Sea Ducks" you are talking of are the black seascoter variety?

    I use #6, #4 or #2 steel, with good effect.

    I LOVE Sea scoters, 'Tinmagrook' around here, and are average/large "duck" size.

    I often use #2 out there as I am also hunting Eiders, which are bigger than most Geese.


    Mmmmmmmm......orange fat dripping from the cut in 1/2 duck, 60-90 minutes at 300', roasting in my oven...
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  4. #4
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Default shot

    I've always used #2s on about everything, but when I used to hunt divers on Lake Michigan I always carried small shot too. You can blow off half a box chasing one cripple. Lot easier to take the head off with #6s than #2s. Bring lots of shells.

  5. #5
    Member DoubleSHOVEL85's Avatar
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    Default 4's and 6's

    use 'em and abuse 'em, unless you are a bad shot. Then I would say to go with the 2's. If your shooting is off, you are more then likely going to cripple the bird with 4's and 6's. That's when 2's are your best bet. Even if you get a bird with just a couple BBs, it is gonna come down. Most people can't knock down birds with 6's @ 45 or 50 yards. Just have to think about the wind and how far your spread is . Lighter b's mean thatt your swing will be effected b/c of the wind. So take a box of 2's and one of 4's and if the wind is honkion and the birds are decoying out on the edge, shoot deuces.

    But i never have a problem with 4s or 6s so...

    Have fun! Post up b/c i wanna know how it went.

    Rob

  6. #6
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Wow guys, thanks for all the info!!!!!
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  7. #7

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    You cant go wrong with #2 Heavishot!! that is what I would use if it were me. those bird are tough!

  8. #8
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    In Cabelas last night I saw hevi shot.
    Might have to try them this week
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  9. #9

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    I used it to duck and goose hnut back east last winter. Its GOOD stuff, and well worth the money. Dont forget about a quality choke tube as well. That will help too! It sounds like you are going onm a great trip. Where to?

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    Don't waste your money on the Black Cloud or Hevi Shot or any other of the high dollar steel alternatives unless you just have cash to burn. I killed a pile of sea ducks up there and never shot anything other than 3" #2 Kent Faststeel. You can go lighter if you like, but I shoot #2's for everything from puddle ducks to sea ducks. The only time I switch sizes is during the early teal season down south (#4's) or when goose hunting (BBB). It's more effective to stick with one size shot and learn its limitations than to try and swap around on specific hunts and try to relearn the lead on each type of shell and shot size.

  11. #11
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    I've never swapped choke tubes either. I shoot the factory modified choke in my Beretta Xtrema II and my Benelli. Those fancy after market choke tubes are fine for shortening your shot string and will definitely make the pattern more dense at the point of impact, but you'll notice you'll miss alot more birds cleanly than you normally would. That shortened shot string makes precise aiming that much more important. It's literally a hit or miss situation with those tubes. I prefer to learn how to shoot my particular shotgun, my shells distance limitations, and how to correctly lead a bird than to spend extra money on a fancy after market choke tube.

  12. #12

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    I havent tried the Kent Faststeel, so I cant give an opinion. As for the chokes, you are talking about two really great guns that come with good chokes. Once I upgraded the choke in my mossberg, I noticed a significant difference in birds down. I really do prefer hevishot. I believe that all but eliminates cripples. But, with that being said, your pictures speak for themselves Ringking.....You did shoot a pile of sea ducks!!!!

  13. #13
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    Chokes and shot are all up to personal opinion and preference. It's like the arguement I always heard about when it came to lead vs steel. To me there was no problem with shooting steel shot b/c it's all I ever knew. When I started duck hunting the law had already been inacted requiring the use of nontox shot. Therefore, I learned to shoot ducks with steel and never knew the advantages of lead.

    I know now , but still don't see a great enough advantage to the hevi shot, tungsten matrix, bismuth, and all the other "magic" killing shells to convince me that $28 for 10 shells is the way to go. I simply learned the limitations of the lead shells that I always shoot and I kill my birds without any problems. I may not be able to knock a bird down at 70 yards like I always hear about with the expensive stuff, but then again I question how many of those shots are taken at a true 70yds anyway.

    To each there own I guess!!

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