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Thread: Snowshoes

  1. #1

    Default Snowshoes

    Has anyone here ever made these? Are they usable, or only good for decoration?
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  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Those aren't Eskimo snow shoes...

    Quote Originally Posted by Wulfslęd View Post
    Has anyone here ever made these? Are they usable, or only good for decoration?
    ... those are an Indian design. They can be seen in lots of old photos of Athabaskan groups from the Interior and Canada.

    When I first moved out to the Bristol Bay area, some old timers used to still make round-nose trail shoes from bent birch. They would lace them with hanging twine and use lamp wicking for the bindings.

    The shoes in your plan are plenty serviceable and would be easier to make than steam bending the rounded bows of regular shoes.

  3. #3
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Default

    I had that same book when I was a kid! I made everything from a Bowie knife to moccasins. Go for it and see what happens. I'd use ash or hickory and rawhide.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for the insight. I'm going to give it a shot. I'll post pics here when I'm done as long as they aren't too embarrassing.

  5. #5
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    Default Ojibway Snowshoes

    I have two pairs of those that I made from kits - got the kits in Minnesota. They are known there as Ojibway Snowshoes. Work well snowshoeing in forests, the pointed tips also do a good job of breaking through crusted snow in the spring. Used to break trail for my dog team with them.

  6. #6
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    Default

    cool site wulfslaed www.inquiry.net

  7. #7

    Default laceing

    If you decide to use rawhide for the laceing be sure and seal it as if it is exposed to melting or slushy snow it will stretch. You also might consider a set of bindings made from inner tube instead of lamp wick. YEA it ain't as traditional but it makes pretty good bindings.
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    Default

    I was thinking about making snowshoe frames out of pex tubing. It's light and pretty tough.

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    Default Pex Snowshoes

    Did you ever do this? I was thinking of the same thing, it can be pressurized down to -100 celcius, flexible, drillable easy to work with my only concern was forcing it to hold a desired shape.

  10. #10
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    The pictured shoes were in use from interior Alaska to the great lakes basin and northern new England, basically anywhere that got decent amounts of snow in north America. I've seen them called Ojibwa, freight and fur traders shoes. They are comparatively easy to make and great floaters. They really shine with a heavy pack on as they are normally very long. Raw hide sealed well with spar varnish is your best bet for the deck webbing. I like the bindings from Iverson snow shoes best but several home made bindings work great too. One thing most folks fail to think of is that traditional snow shoes have no cleats, a dog "training" collar wired and zip strapped to the foot bar works great.
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  11. #11
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default dream it make it test it, maybe toss it..

    here are some snowshoes made from light weight conduit.
    One winter I hauled on a sled 16 pieces of conduit and a big roll of rope on a sled out to finger lakes, ( Kenai national wildlife refuge) one weekend.
    this is back when they had the little cabin out there, before it mysteriously burned down .. the Refuge knows nothing about that of course...
    we brought along a bender, bent them and screwed in a toe plate made of hardwood, and laced them up... as this one shows,, in not a real particular fashion,,..
    Some of the boys used car inner tubes for the straps, I had an extra few of the leather lace ups, and in one night, we made 8 pairs of somewhat usable snow shoes..
    I was thinking about your idea of using PEX for the frame, and wondered if you bent the tube to shape on a jig, then using a long straw, filled the insides of the tubes with spray foam insulation.. maybe this would help it hold its shape and give it some rigidity without much of any weight..
    then using nylon straping you could lace them up for some fun and cheap get out of danger snow shoes..
    Max
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