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Thread: Great Glock Animation

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Default Great Glock Animation

    Found a link to this animation on GT and thought I would share

    You can adjust the settings at the bottom, stop the animation in any part of the sequence, and mouse-over any part to see it and what it does during the firing sequence....pretty cool

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    That's awesome! Thanks for posting Hunt
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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    No prob. It was the best one I'd seen so far!!

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    I'm actually planning on using this in a talk that I have to give, aptly titled "The Physics of Firearms"

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    I have heard this before, but never really believed. Does the bullet actually leave the barrel before the slide cycles? That is how it shoes it in this illustration.

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    I have heard this before, but never really believed. Does the bullet actually leave the barrel before the slide cycles? That is how it shoes it in this illustration.
    Yes. The breech stays locked until well after the bullet exits. If it didn't injury or damage would result from the high pressures generated.
    Now what ?

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    You wouldn't be able to hit the broad side of a barn if the slide was in motion before the bullet got out of the pipe. Notice that the first thing the barrel does is drop at the breach and lift at the muzzle. There would be no way shoot a group with that. And Glocks will shoot a pretty tight group as far as combat pistols go.
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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    And Dave Sevigny seems to do OK w/ 'em in competition too...

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Makes sense guys. Just from shotguns to pistols I have always heard you loose velocity because of the slide or action. So that has been a myth flying around for years? I have heard that so many times, even at the gun shops.

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Is the proper name 'Delayed Blowback"?

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    Makes sense guys. Just from shotguns to pistols I have always heard you loose velocity because of the slide or action. So that has been a myth flying around for years? I have heard that so many times, even at the gun shops.
    You do loose a bit of velocity with a gas system like an AK. The amount of velocity lost in a gas system ain't worth fretting over but I think this is what keeps the myth alive.
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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    Is the proper name 'Delayed Blowback"?
    No. Delayed blowback is a different design and is how the HK-91/G3 operates. Delayed blowback relies on direct chamber pressure to cycle the bolt. However, the mechanism has been engineered to put the brakes on bolt movement until chamber pressures drop to safe levels. HK-91 achieves this by cutting flutes in the chamber and using what they call a roller locking mechanism.

    The recoil operated system is designed so the the breech remains locked while the bullet travels down the barrel which makes it possible to shoot larger and higher pressure cartridges. By the time the recoil impulse overcomes the inertia of the slide weight, mainspring (for hammer guns) and recoil spring, the bullet is out and gas pressures inside the barrel are zero or nearly zero.

    Semi-auto .22 rimfires are the most common example of direct-blowback semis as they use the pressure from burning powder gases while the bullet is still running down the barrel. Again it's a delicate balance of bolt/slide weight, recoil spring pressure and mainspring pressure to get them to cycle safely, but still reliably.
    Direct blowback is why semi-auto rimfires get so crudded up in the action. There have been a few semi auto centerfire pistols made in direct blowback, but none to my knowledge have been larger than 9mm. Otherwise you run into the problem of having to make very heavy springs and slides to contain the gas pressure. Blowback operated semis do not lock up or use locking lugs like recoil operates guns and they usually have fixed barrels.

    Perhaps others can chime in on some of the makes models of blowback pistols. I know there was a Spanish one and I think the Germans also produced some.
    Now what ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    I have heard this before, but never really believed. Does the bullet actually leave the barrel before the slide cycles? That is how it shoes it in this illustration.
    The slide and barrel does start to move before the bullet leaves the barrel, but not very far. During this initial movement the slide does not move down, so the barrel breach stays locked. In a Browning high power type cam mechanism, this is due to the cam slot being horizontal for a short distance before sloping to lower the barrel out of the slide. In a 1911 type toggle mechanism it does not move down due to the toggle link being vertical so any rearward movement does not lead to much up and down movement.

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