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Thread: Buck fever; signs and symptoms

  1. #1
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default Buck fever; signs and symptoms

    Ever had or seen a hunter with buck fever? tell us your story, would be interesting and fun reading for everyone. Thanks

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    Would 16 misses at 100-200 yards with a .300wm count??

    I watched a guy do that, a First time in Alaska "Self hunt" kinda guy who was tenting alongside the river. He came over to our fire, midday, and when a Big ol' bull saunter'd down the ridge for 1/2 an hour and drew close to the rivers edge (he was on our side, we gave him the "OK" to have at it, and away down the willows to close up, and excited he was.....with a brand new rifle and scope the guy at the counter had "Sighted in for 100yards" while he waited at that counter~~LOL!!~~

    Them shots whent everywhere, and the Bull parralled the river tward our camp, stopping, looking, dodging the dust from the hits nearby..~~LOL!!~~ trotting along but he was outta shells by then.....

    the kicker was my pard dropping that Bull with a single 270 upside the head. That guy was a bit upset, but went back and got another box, and since we'd been shooting anyway, we sighted his rifle to 200 yards and he did well a few hours later.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  3. #3

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    The last time I missed an animal, I was 13. With that said, the day I quit having "buck fever", is the day I quit hunting.

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    Member bigmtn's Avatar
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    Default buck fever buck

    My first chance at a nice whitetail buck found me at full draw with my 20 yd pin lined up with his vitals, leg was shaking, arm pits drippin, seconds from lettin the arrow fly when I realized I forgot to put a arrow in.

  5. #5
    Member akguy454's Avatar
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    Default seen it all year

    My hunting partner just got back to Alaska. We hunted together a few years back when I was still in the army.... well OK camped together since we did not know what we were doing. Well I ended up staying here and learning the "ropes" and have been pretty successfull. So when he came back it was my turn to show him the ropes. We had a bait stand and the first bear that walked in 20 yds mind you .......he missed and I took it with follow up.

    Bou hunting this year he was given first shot then as well..........he missed and I took it with follow up shot.

    I watched him shoot at the range before each outing and he was on..... But to make him feel better I told him awwww must have gotten knocked off on the trip out here( yeah right).... He did roll his 4 wheeler and snap that "non shooting" gun in half and is going to have to buy a new one... I cannot wait to see what the next excuse is going to be next year.

  6. #6
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default Had and have

    I have had buck fever ever since I started. On my first few deer I usually just pulled up the gun and started slinging lead; shotgun with a bead sight. As I graduated to a scoped rifle I became better shot, still excited. If you have never had buck fever, it is like this: heavy breathing, heart rate goes up, sure blood pressure rises also. Sounds like another activity that raises all the above, but not quite the same. One of our buddy's, when younger, pulled up on a deer as it ran through the woods and racked all his loaded shells out of his lever action 30-30--without pulling the triggger. He thought he was shooting.

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    Default Right on Lost_by_Choice!

    I completely agree with ya Lost_By_Choice, I still get buck fever, even with small bou, I just control much better now. If I don't get that loud heart beat and nervous tension I might as well quit hunting.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Was told this story a few years back by an ol timer from Minnesota about a young buck whom he had taken under his wing, when the boy got a lil older he brought him on a moose hunting trip to Canada. At the camp there was a canoe, so the very next day he let the young man borrow his 375 H&H and sent him out on a canoe trip around the lake, in hope that he would see a bull moose to shoot. The young man canoed out and padded the shore line looking in every inlet and creek that was flowing into the lake. When it was getting late in the evening he paddled into a lil inlet and to his suprise there was a bull moose standing in the water. The young man was so excited to see a moose that he immediately took the rifle and aimed right at it and squeezed the trigger, having never shot a rifle larger than his 270 winchester he wasn't prepared for the recoil. The recoil and jump of the rifle rocked him so much the he rolled right over into the water, rifle, canoe and all. He figured afterward that it wasn't such a good idea to be shooting a rifle broadside in a round bottom canoe. By the way he did get the moose, ol timer said he came back to camp soaked n' wet but with a big smile on his face, ol timer said he wore that smile for many days afterward.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Yep my first trip to Kim Village in Okinawa when I was seventeen

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    Default Moose hunting in Canada

    When I was a kid, my buddy who was a year older than me (and old enough to hunt with adult supervision) and my adult sister and I went moose hunting. I was good at calling so we targeted a lake that was known for good moose hunting. First day we called this massive (65+) bull and another a bit smaller out to the other side of the lake. The big one worked his way around the lake and the smaller swam within about a hundred yards of us and turned back. The big guy came to about two hundred yards out, circled and caught our wind without giving us a shot.

    A couple more trips with similar tales and we got smart. I called moved down the lake a ways and called when the big bull started coming. He did the usual round the lake and cut up into the bush, except this time when he did the circle the wind was right and he came out about twenty yards from my buddy and sister. My buddy had his scope cranked up to look at the moose across the lake. Shots rang out and the bolt actions were going like M-16s on full auto. I was sitting in a moose trail on the edge of the lake and heard thundering hooves. I jumped and bailed over a tree root and that moose passed me at mach 3 about six feet away! Only evidence left behind was a few strands of long back hair.

    Never crank your high power scope up when you anticipate a close range shot or even at all. Carry binoculars. You could forget to turn it down and finding the vitals on a moose that more than fills the scope is, apparantly, very difficult.

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    Member fish2live's Avatar
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    Default

    I got the fever in bow season once and could not for the life of me pull the bow to full draw it was like 90 percent of my muscle power was gone.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default Yup

    Had it several times - usually now "after" I shoot thank goodness!
    One of best happened when I was about 18. Had 2 nice whitetail bucks slip in behind me and walk out about 10 feet from my stand. I was perched in a very small tree about 12 feet high - I am 6ft 2" - 250 lbs so yes I stuck out!
    Anyway, they caught me by suprise and next thing I knew here were 2 bucks in my face. They looked up at me and I could not move - tried closing my eyes to avoid eye contact. At that point I started shaking so much my arrow bounced off my bow and clattered to the ground! Deer made a hasty retreat and I was left trying to catch my breath! From then on I new that hunting big game was a rush I would need forever!

  13. #13

    Default knees a rattling

    One of my buddies from highschool came up for a moose hunt. We had seen alot of moose in a certain area so we headed in. When we were across the water hole we heard some bull grunts and antler thrashing. It sounded like someone was hitting the end of the bull magnet on the tree without covering the end and the grunts sounded like a green horn. I told him ah hell its just some hunter calling! When a 60+ bull steped out angry we both had to clear our eyes and shorts. When I looked at my buddy he was in deep with buck fever. He said " I cant get still " so I broke a Y stick off a tree next to us. I dont believe it would even hold the weight of a sparrow. He did hit the bull. But man was he ever worked up. I seem to get the fever more so when I am calling them in and can see them respond. It gets me more worked up than pulling the trigger!

  14. #14
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I've honestly never had it. Yep, I feel my attention focus, but I don't get nervous and do stupid stuff. I used to feel that it was because I lived a fairly exciting life riding snowmobiles and other off-road vehicles, competing in archery tournaments, plus I volunteered as an EMT and firefighter. It takes a lot to get my adrenaline going. Once my son and daughter started hunting I found that the also had no issue letting the hammer down on an animal. My son, particularly, is cool as a cucumber when it comes to shooting an animal.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member DoubleSHOVEL85's Avatar
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    Default Akdoug

    Wow, I also snowmachine and rock climb and Mountain Bike and other various adrenaline junkie sports but i don't think that any of them get me more pumped then hunting. I usually can't sleep but maybe a couple hours 3 or 4 days before a season opener. I'm not even talking about the shot but the whole experience my senses go into over drive. "If you ever lose that feeling, it will be the day you hang it up!" that's what my old man always told me. 24 yrs later here I am about to piss myself everytime a bird decoys or i hear that familiar snort and grunt in the brush. But hey it could just be something different for you.

    Rob

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    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Default I get it

    I can tell the harder the buck fever hits me the harder I try to block out the fact that whatever im aiming at has antlers. The more excited I get the more I try to actually think about concentrating on the target.

  17. #17
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Not only do I sleep well the day before an opener.. I've been known to sleep in the middle of the day in the field..
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I am in the same boat as you Doug. Even my first caribou in my early teens was not much different than shooting paper. I do get excited after some shots though. Never on small game but I do celebrate a long stalk or great shot. Even my goat this year at over 300 yards was total focus no racing heart nothing like that. When that goat collapsed and started rolling down toward us I did hoist my rifle in celebration and let a cheer echo off the mountains though!

  19. #19
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    When I was serious about target archery I spent a bunch of time studying the mental aspects of sports. It's the mental game that seperates the pros from the joes when it comes to accuracy sports. I learned to control the excitement and anxiety that comes with having to make an important shot in a pressure environment. While I'm not competing actively in archery anymore, that mental programming is still with me.

    I think that the pressure to succeed weighs heavily on some folks. The pressure of how much it cost or how much effort that went into getting to the point of taking that shot. The pressure of the size of animal if you are a guy/gal that measures success on rack/skull size. The importance of success on a hunt to your relationship with your friends/family/hunting buddies. Even the pressure of being successful to feed your family. I think all these factors, and more, effect how some behave before a shot. Others are just plain excitable in their personality.

    In reality, I doubt there is a definative answer on why/how people react before shooting. I do disagree with the assertion that those of us that react with less excitement somehow care less about the act of taking the life of another living creature or somehow appreciate hunting less.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Sometimes there is a lot of pressure when you hunt animals for food. Family and extended family depend on your success to bring home the meat. But as my grandfather always told us if don't see the animal you are hunting for or you don't get a shot, don't worry about it too much. You will get another chance another day. He also said not to come home emptyhanded too, if the animals are not there then gather some dry wood for the steamhouse, or catch some fish or small game like ptarmigan or rabbits. He never liked to see us come home empty handed. A lil something can go a long ways whether it is wood or fish. As for getting excited when hunting, I still do too, but my excitement has changed over the years. Certain animals get me more excited than others. I think my excitement has turned into an increased awareness, more along the lines of what is the best approach and strategy to get as close as possible to the animal for the best available shot kinda thing. Guess a hunter's excitement from his youth kinda matures over the years as his skill and experiences increase. Just my thoughts.

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