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Thread: Canoe for float trip...

  1. #1
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    Default Canoe for float trip...

    Will an alluminium canoe work decently for this pourpose?

    Just wondering????

    I'd like to try sometime.

  2. #2
    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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  3. #3

    Default Depends

    You are limited to road access pretty much with a rigid hull. I have taken 6-8 moose over the years with my 17 ft Old Town here on the Kenai. A large bull pretty much takes one trip by itself. I have taken camp and smaller bulls out in one trip. There are options where you could use a aluminum canoe for sure.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default

    Depends on the trip. For a remote fly in trip on a class I/II river, the Ally canoe is awesome. I have a 16.5' Ally that I have used on three remote floats in Alaska. Mine holds around 800 lbs and would work at or under that weight. Depends on how much you plan to haul in it of course. With two piece canoe paddles in the same bag, it weighs 50 lbs and is easy to fly as checked luggage on commercial flights. The bag is actually a large backpack for carrying the boat. Slick set up and great for remote fly in trips.






    Below in the green bag is the canoe...

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  5. #5
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Get a raft...

    a.c.,
    Will a canoe work on a float trip?
    Occasionally, yes.
    Usually, NO.

    Canoes fill up fast. Fully loaded, and overloaded with a high center of gravity, they become unstable. Rafts are much more forgiving. As opposed to paddling a canoe, a raft oarsman can make many more mistakes and not get wet.

    Think of the serpentine shape of most wild rivers and streams. Then toss in river hazards like exposed rocks and blown-down trees. Keep in mind that many rivers have many very shallow areas also. A thirty mile flat water float, "as the crow flies", can be 16+- floating hours on the water, often much more. That equates to hundreds and hundreds of raft maneuvers and thousands of oar strokes. If you slam an undercut bank with a raft, nothing usually happens. If you slam an undercut bank with your canoe, you and your gear will get wet.

    Unless you are really a sensational canoe paddler, and unless you know the river to be floated......get a raft, or two.

    In the last three+ years, the rafting forum has had a bunch of "whats-the-best-raft" threads. Mikeys book is really good also.

    One additional gem of wisdom...personally, I can not stand the sounds of any metal boat (paddles whacking the boat, scraping the gravel creek bottom, ect....) on any wild water. Yeah, I'm a raft guy.

    And yet another, final gem....if you and/or your hunting/floating buddies have a tired, old lower-lumbar-back...get a raft. Sitting and moving around in a raft is much more "back friendly" as opposed to the normal paddling position when in a canoe.

    Dennis

  6. #6
    Member 379 Peterbilt's Avatar
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    Default

    I've hunted out of both a canoe and inflatables, both with outboards. I will take an inflatable every day of the week, twice on sundays.

    I put roughly 30 rivermiles on the Yukon with this 19' Gruman. Doubt I'll ever do that again. I just do not see an advantage of a canoe vs a quality inflatable....unless the canoe is your only option, which was my case a few years ago. It did the job for me, and I was lucky to have access to it, but perhaps I took to big a bite with big water/small craft, LOL




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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default

    I think they both have their places. A canoe shaped craft can be more efficiently pushed with smaller more portable motors than an inflatable. An inflatable's uses are great for fly-out trips. I've hauled a boat full of moose meat and camp gear with my square-sterned canoe and enjoyed every moment of it. I'll be all up and down the yukon from May-September next yr. The yukon is a great place for a freighter canoe. With that said......I do want 3 inflatables. Two pack rafts.....for hiking up smaller creeks and leaving the canoe on the river shore. I also want a multi-purpose larger inflatable for remote fishing/and hunting trips. There is something nostalgic about looking down in your canoe and seeing 5-600 pounds of moose meat pushing up current through beautiful Alaska at 8-10 mph.......I wouldn't trade it for the world. With tiller extension in hand.....I stand up most of the time. Think about this advantage: 67 miles roundtrip (with a moose on the return), burnt 5 gallons of gas!

    So with that said.......I need and want both canoes and inflatables.....I've put too much meat n fish in the freezer to turn my nose up at canoes.

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    Default

    I see your guys point. I'll check inflatable rafts out. I really don't enjoy the thought of bringing a canoe to Alaska anyways.

    But what about going back up river if you have to? Is it possible with a raft?

  9. #9
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Lightbulb A Float trip...

    Andrew
    A float trip, to those of us who do float trips or float hunts, implies floating downstream or downriver. Going upstream or upriver sounds more like boating or motoring against the current. Typical round rafts are super for float trips, as in floating with the current. Catarafts, although "motor capable", usually are still used for with-the-current floats. The smallish motor usually used on catarafts are best used to cross flat water lakes or slow-flat water sections of rivers.

    If you want or need to go back up the river against the current, then you may be interested in the square stern freighter canoe type rig viewed in one of the previous posts. And a smallish square-sterned canoe, with a 7HP (or 9HP) motor and a jack-ass motor lift can go upstream in some surprisingly tiny creeks.

    Bring your canoe to AK. Canoes have their place up here. And consider getting a proper float boat, a raft, when you get here. And, once in the great white-green north, you can consider the different types of motorized water crafts we use, also.

    No single type of boat will do it all. But each type of boat, and anything that floats is a boat, has its place up here. Again the rafting forum, the float hunting forum and the canoe forum and the power boating forum archives are jam packed with info on each type of watercraft.

    We all came here wanting the most versatile boat, the craft that will do it all. But the do-everything boat does not exist. So we all picked the craft that best fits our preferred style and personality. Or we bought multiple types of boats for different applications.

    ....imho....

    Dennis

  10. #10
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    Default

    Alot of good information! Thanks!

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