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Thread: Plastic boots for sheep

  1. #1

    Default Plastic boots for sheep

    Hi Guys, I'm new to the forum and alaska in general. I'm booked for a chugach sheep hunt next august and am looking for good plastics.
    I just recieved 2 pr of invernos to try on both were way to small even though they were a 1/2 and 1 size to over my reg size. They are being returned and larger ones on the way to try out.

    I was also reading up on the scarpa omegas, lighter fast better than the invernos according to reviews, does anybody have any opinions on either of these boots, or other recommendations? I generally wear a med width boot if this matter for brand and style choice. I've been warned off of leather by my outfitter so want to stay away from them.
    Any advice is greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    i haven't got any experience in plastics but i was lookin' at the boots your looking at and decided i was going with the lighter of the two when it came time. i have been places where i wished i had plastics and i wished i had lighter boots...soooo
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Personally speaking, I would never use plastics for sheep hunting. They would be beneficial 20% of the time and an absolute hinderance the other 80% of the time. Lowa leather boots are the way to go for my feet.

  4. #4
    Member wldboar's Avatar
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    Default Plastic boots for sheep

    HOw are you going to get the sheep to stay still long enough to put plastic boots on it?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by wldboar View Post
    HOw are you going to get the sheep to stay still long enough to put plastic boots on it?
    I figure I could just through the overboot at 'em. Anybody know the external ballistics of a size 12 plastic overboot? Maybe I could get ballistic compensating sun glasses.

  6. #6

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    My size 11.5 Koflach shells weigh in at about 900 grams each. Let me do some math here:

    900 grams = 13887 grains

    13887 grains chucked at 270fps,

    ((13887 * 13887) * 270) / 450240 =

    115647.5826892324093816631130064 foot lbs

    I'd say that'd probably be a kill shot, assuming you could hit it in the vitals.


    +1 for leather/synthetic mountaineering boots. Lighter, just as much support, pretty much just as waterproof if treated correctly, vastly more comfortable, more articulate. Largest drawback: hard to dry in the field once soaked.

  7. #7
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Since Koflaches have gone the way of the dinosaur Barney's carries Scarpa Omegas and Lowa Chivettas. When customers try both on the Lowa is more popular 8-9 times out of 10. People think the Lowa is more comfortable and like the lace up booty.

    Brett

  8. #8
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Used Koflachs Degrees till I wore them out, Now vastly prefer La Sportiv Trago IIs. You don't break in Plastics, they break you in.

  9. #9
    Member woodman6437's Avatar
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    Default Love my plastic boots

    I'm not a hunter but I do a lot of climbing and use a pair of Koflach Degre's. I climb through snow, ice, talus, scree, cross streams, use them clipped into skis, crampons, and snowhoes. Sometimes I even wear them out into town to impress my friends. I have had them for over two years now and I absolutely love them. It's a shame they were bought out by Atomic. If you can find them anywhere i recommend them. I am sure there are still some floating around somewhere. Don't know anything about Scarpa besides their AT boots.

  10. #10

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    Thanks for the input guys. I decided on the invernos (they are sized way small BTW, I wear a 12, and ending up with having to buy a US 14!) They are stiff, I used them on a soft soil cliff and it was like having a stairs under my feet. I tried a pair of omegas, they're very light and not very stiff, I just couldn't get them to feel right and they were the noisiest things I've ever seen, seriously, I walked down the hallway with them and my 4 year son came out rubbing his eyes and asking me to put them away because the noise woke him up and scared him.
    I have a pair of SOLES moldables on the way, the insole that comes with the invernos is basically cardboard.
    I didn't try the koflachs, I thinking that may have been a mistake because I haven't heard a negative word about them. Well, I have all winter to hike in the invernos we'll see what happens. I they give me trouble they will be off to Ebay.

  11. #11
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    Thumbs up

    The main thing is that they fit you proper, not the brand name. For my foot the Koflach's did not fit. Too wide in the heel and narrow in the toe. But, the Lowa Civettas fit me. I know what you mean about having stairs under your feet. Plastics are great for the steep loose stuff. A compromise for sure when hiking in on the approach but really nice with a heavy pack in dicy situations.

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    Default vote for leather

    I agree that for every different shape of foot there is a different boot. I have found that plastics are advantageous when there is no approach. Immediate climb goat hunts they work great.

    Any sheep type mountain hunt that require an approach I have found mountaineering class leather much easier on my feet and knees then plastics.

    I am currently running Scarpa Liskamm GTX. Ran them for 4 goat hunts this fall and never wet, no blisters, not even a hot spot, again all feet are different, but one vote for high end leathers and absolutely not plastics for 99.99%- from my experience. I honestly havent found any downside to high end rigid leathers, as long as they are well waterproofed, has anyone found a significant reason to run plastics or something else in normal sheep situations?
    Thanks
    mike

  13. #13
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    I've hunted sheep the last two years with my Leather Lowas, and after two sheep/goat hunts they are really tore up bad. I was thinking of going plastic myself.

    I am by no means a boot expert but, I figured how these leathers get tore up so bad. Despite all the water sealing on them since they were new, moisture eventually gets into them, and any type of mountain hunt will put any boot to the test because of the different types of terrain. I have used "Sno seal" on them (which was told not good anyway) and noticed it tends to work itself out and moisture still soaks the boot (through time) but, The boot stays wet and weakens the leather therefore, every little rock, shale etc. just tears up and eats away at the leather.

    pourmud is right about approach, different ranges or areas have different approaches, some areas you have to go thru alder thickets and grassy areas before getting up above the timberline, sometimes for miles. And some areas (like the Brooks) you start directly from high alpine country depending where you are.

    If I can find a COMFORTABLE plastic mountaineering boot that I like ( color doesn't matter) I will go with them. I've already had "boot country" replace one hook eyelet, and I had to use wader seal to seal the black rubber strip that was peeling off the sides that resulted from last hunt. But they are still hanging in there and I could probably muster one more hunt with them, until I can afford those fancy "high priced plastics"....good thread by the way.

  14. #14

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    For me the main reason for choosing plastics is that my outfitter told me too and I think this has more to do with the area we are hunting than anything else. So that keeps the choice simple for me. I added the ed viestrus (sp?) moldable soles and that makes the invernos quite comfortable. They are still plastics though and take some getting used to. As far as price goes I got them from Seirra trading post for $160, so I can't complain about the price and they have a great return policy so you can order a couple of sizes to get your fit right.
    Basically the outfitter (who I've known for several years and trust completely) says that in this area leather would be fine if we are done in a few days but if we go the full 10-12 days I would likely have trouble. He's had several clients with torn up feet when the hunt extends so the advice comes from experience. Considering I might never beable to do this hunt again I can't afford to experiment and need to go with what works.

    With that being said, for pretty much any hunt in the lower 48 I don't think I would use plastics at least in warmer weather, for a late season elk hunt in really steep stuff they might be just the ticket, tough.

  15. #15
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Default

    People either love them or hate them. I tried and tried, but ended up on the hating side. You probably won't know until you have them a while. If you have time, watch for a pair used. I dumped mine cheap and bought Lowas. Another forum member bought them for mountain climbing, but he, himself, also used Lowas for sheep hunting.

    Hope you find boots you like, because there's nothing worse if you don't.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    People either love them or hate them. I tried and tried, but ended up on the hating side. You probably won't know until you have them a while. If you have time, watch for a pair used. I dumped mine cheap and bought Lowas. Another forum member bought them for mountain climbing, but he, himself, also used Lowas for sheep hunting.

    Hope you find boots you like, because there's nothing worse if you don't.
    Over the holidays I plan to put some trail time on them to really know whether I can live with them or not. So far with the SOLES in and smart wool hunters they seem very comfortable, but we'll see what I think after several miles of steep stuff.

  17. #17
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default scarpa omegas

    Can someone tell me the difference between the Scarpa omega ice boot and the Scarpa omega mountaineering boot? i have found them online (both models) at one website and the ice boot is $90 cheaper. I have researched them and one has Pebax uppers and the other plastic, and the difference in weight is 2 ounces for the same size boots. Just wondering if one is stiffer than the other. However they look almost identical.

  18. #18

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    Plastic belongs on Tikka rifles and not on your feet! Lowa............

  19. #19
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default X2

    Quote Originally Posted by woodman6437 View Post
    I'm not a hunter but I do a lot of climbing and use a pair of Koflach Degre's. I climb through snow, ice, talus, scree, cross streams, use them clipped into skis, crampons, and snowhoes. Sometimes I even wear them out into town to impress my friends. I have had them for over two years now and I absolutely love them. It's a shame they were bought out by Atomic. If you can find them anywhere i recommend them. I am sure there are still some floating around somewhere. Don't know anything about Scarpa besides their AT boots.
    Same here. 5 years old and have ski bindings for them, crampons, snowshoes, Barney's waders, etc. Always worn on late season goat hunts or sheep hunts where I am walking alot of steeper terrain or alot of sidehilling days on end. Still wear leathers early sheep, mainly because they make my feet really hot that early. Koflach Degre. Not as comfortable as leathers, but never got 5 years from a leather either.

  20. #20
    Member 454casull's Avatar
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    Smile Sheep hunting boots



    I believe the high end leathers are the ticket for sheep hunting. I have used a pair of La Sportiva Nepal EVO GT's for three years now, and they will take tremendous abuse with the comfort of a leather boot. As you can see in the picture, they have a very high rubber rand that really protects the boot and aids waterproofing. I wear OR gaitors while sheep hunting which cover my boots almost to the rand so there is very little leather exposed to the elements which is why I don't ever have a problem with the leather retaining moisture on an extended mountain hunt. The high end leather mountaineering boots are also very rigid (but not quite as much as a plastic) which in my opinion and experience is a necessary evil for climbing and long term protection from rock.

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