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Thread: History

  1. #1
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default History

    I'm sure someone will inform me who it was that said "Those who do not know history are doomed to repeat it". Those are great words.

    I have no crystal ball so I don't know what the future will bring. I do go back far enough to know what it was like. If you are young (and everyone is young to me), read a book about what Alaska was like 30, 40, 100 years ago. Talk to some of the "old timers". The first name that comes to mind is Art Fields (a relative of stranger). If you can't talk to Art, maybe stranger would be kind enough to tell a story or two. According to Art, he totaled 5 cubs in his flying career. Or maybe Steve Harvey - who flies out of Kodiak and has been flying for a LONG time. Or maybe one of the elder Ketchums or whoever.

    Read books about pilots who heated engine oil on wood stoves so it would be liquid enough to get their plane started.

    Try to get a sense of what Alaska was like several years ago. Then you can have something to judge where it is today and maybe even see some of the reasons. Certainly technology and the large increase in residents have both contributed to the change.

    If you can't think of anything better, send an e-mail, give me your phone number, and I will call in January or February (when the hunting seasons are mostly over) and spin some yarns about what Alaska was like 40 years ago. Or maybe even why I knew the pipeline was a "done deal" several years before congress approved it. Certainly one of the changes in my life that I didn't see coming was the advent of "digital phone" which allows me to call people in Alaska and not incur additional "long distance" charges.

    All-in-all, everyone should know what life was like "before" and why it is like it is now. Only armed with that knowledge can one look with impartiality and see why change always occurs.

  2. #2
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Hmmm i am thinking Churchill or Dwight D. said your quote


    but don't quote me on it..


    Phil.. AK history is changing as we watch... still is


    you have to consider that we have a large population base that is less then 175 years out of the stone age. and i mean PRE bow and arrow stone age.

    you have to consider that Alaska is still the explorers realm of discovery...

    and she is growing .

    some of our mountains are still as well.. AK has some of the youngest geological structures in the world.

    and the youngest people thats for sure.(mostly because the old farts move out in the winter)
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Default History

    Those who forget history are bound to repeat it ;WINSTON CHURCHILL
    There has been a lot of change from when I was a kid hunting in muldoon. What the future holds is hard to tell. But growth will definately be at the front of our change here.

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    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Thanks Again

    A sincere thank you to both Vince & Sledhand who gave information on the quote I used. I can usually get the "gist" of a quote but seldom get it entirely correct or remember the author.

    On my previous post, I specifically asked for comments and got several. On this post I wasn't expecting much comment - just exhorting people to look at the past so they have a guideline for the future.

    I don't usually recommend books and this IS NOT a recommendation. Just some that I have read: The Flying North by Jean Potter
    Blue Hills by Judy Ferguson
    Video - North American Conservation with Sean Mahoney.

    I'm sure there are many others equal to or even better than these. I would be glad to have someone list them for me (and others).

    In 1997 when we did a drop camp off the Noatak River, I had the experience of talking to and flying with Art Fields. The flight was in a super cub and the gas fumes almost made me sick (and I never get motion sickness). It was after our hunt and we just flew around and looked at the countryside. Art did recount some hunting stories and one was that his last polar bear was actually stalking he and his hunter. After Art shot the bear, it actually dropped on them as it was above them on an ice flow. Scarey stuff and not to be experienced by any of us.

    I'm still hoping stranger can spin some "Art Fields" stories here. I would love to hear more of them.

    Now in his 90s, Art goes far back into the history of Alaska.
    Last edited by Phil; 10-22-2009 at 07:17. Reason: poor typing skills

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I believe that most after reading about Alaska past would say they are glad they live here now. It was a tuff life and many a homesteader packed it in after a couple years. Having done it the old way for almost seven years I know I could do it again. Store bought is just so much easier but it takes away from your soul.Folks used to come to Alaska to get away from it but now its like the gold rush days where money is the first thought. I would love for it to go back to the 20's or 30's way of life

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I believe that most after reading about Alaska past would say they are glad they live here now. It was a tuff life and many a homesteader packed it in after a couple years. Having done it the old way for almost seven years I know I could do it again. Store bought is just so much easier but it takes away from your soul.Folks used to come to Alaska to get away from it but now its like the gold rush days where money is the first thought. I would love for it to go back to the 20's or 30's way of life
    About the only thing I miss from the good old days was the willingness of people to work and take responsibility for their situations. Sure have not missed going through another polio epidemic like in the early 50's or having more friends die because they were rejected for a place on the only dialysis machine that was located in Seattle.
    I certainly DO enjoy the hunting opportunities that are in some ways greater than they have ever been - in part because a couple of miles is now a LOOONNNNGGG way to so many.
    Joe (Ak)

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    There some good historical info and great pictures on the.........

    "Statewide Library Electronic Doorway"

    SLED- Alaska

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Joe you have to admit hideing under the school desk in case of atomic bombs was fun

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Joe you have to admit hideing under the school desk in case of atomic bombs was fun

    OH COME ON YOU DID NOT DO THAT UP HERE....




    every one knows the blast would have melted the schooligloo.....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member sledhands's Avatar
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    No realy. I remember they took us out of school when they set the one off on Aqutan I believe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Joe you have to admit hideing under the school desk in case of atomic bombs was fun
    At the time I thought so - ten minute drills just put me that much closer to "quitting time", so I could go do important stuff (and that did not include READING!),
    Joe (Ak)

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    Member sledhands's Avatar
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    Default Polar bear

    My father in-law McCarlo Christiansen and step father in-law Jeff Graham were both guides that flew out over the ocean to hunt polar bear on the ice. I have heard stories of flying along the russian coast in the 60.s in a modified cub and p-14 so they could have the range to reach the russian coast. Hunting by Wainwright Island with the locals in those communities coming out to wave when they flew over. Father in-law said it was a severe pucker factor flying by radar installations waiting for a Mig to flame them. Great Stuff

  13. #13

    Talking

    Thanks,
    But...I am going to spend my dime calling the Phsycic in Las Vegas that can tell me what Alaska will be like in fifty years, when I become old. I need to know what I am faced with by a reputable source.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  14. #14
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Future

    AK RES - Having some physics lab tell you what they THINK Alaska will be like in 50 years will not tell you where it has come from. While I have a son who is an expert in modeling with a super computer, knowing history is a lot more productive.

    BTW, I don't understand what you mean by "reputable source". Do you think someone who models the future is more reputable than someone who lived for a long time in Alaska?

    Phil Stewart

  15. #15

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil View Post
    AK RES - Having some physics lab tell you what they THINK Alaska will be like in 50 years will not tell you where it has come from. While I have a son who is an expert in modeling with a super computer, knowing history is a lot more productive.

    BTW, I don't understand what you mean by "reputable source". Do you think someone who models the future is more reputable than someone who lived for a long time in Alaska?

    Phil Stewart
    Phil
    Yes, I do. Take a look at Alaska's past. I mean take a good hard look at our history. Then pick up the daily news rag or go online and research what is happening today and what the FEDS have in store for us tomorrow. There is no basis whatsoever that history will tell us what to expect.

    You will not find correlation, in any way, shape, form or fashion. The Alaska we all knew, is no longer. What Alaska will look like tomorrow, can only be foretold by a pshycic. We are undergoing a social engineering process that is unprecedented and never before endured in the history of our nation, much less the history of the Great State of Alaska.

    You might be very disappointed on your next return visit, only to discover that what you thought you knew, just ain't so no more.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  16. #16
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Miss-read

    Sorry I miss-read psychic for physics.

    You may be right but for now, I still hold my convictions. I guess we just have to agree to disagree.

    Phil Stewart

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Very many of the old Alaskans predicted the ruin of Alaska with statehood and finding of oil

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    I'll talk to Art when he's back from Anchorage, and get something "Fresh"

    His grandmother was my fatherinlaws Aunt, so he's the wifes second cousin.
    I think hes 91 now.
    My Fatherinlaw Koksiinaq "Joe" took care of the young Art when Joe was in his late teen,s dragging him along when he lived whith his Aunt and uncle in Kotzebue, after his Mother died. Old Joe had some good storys too, about hunting with a dogteam, and getting rich (then 100$ a fox)trapping white fox up the coaville inthe 20's.
    Its always good to hang out withthe old folks, and since the wife was #14 of his 15 kids she was home to care for them when they were old. Now her parents are dead, but we still have a few elders over because the wife speaks Inupiaq and we all eat the same stuff, so its a social thing. I also hunt, she fishes for some elders as well, and they want to hear the story when we bring stuff.
    I'll come up with something.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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