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Thread: Aerial Predator Control for Wolves

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    Default Aerial Predator Control for Wolves

    Hey all. I'm writing an opinion paper for a college English class on the benefits of aerial wolf hunting and I'm looking for any facts and statistics you all can give me. I've seen a lot of discussions on here about the damage wolves can do to moose/caribou populations and I'm looking for some specific cases in Alaska where wolves have decimated those game populations. I need reliable, documented sources and statistics. I know Rick Kinmon has quite a few statistics in his book but I was wondering if you all know of any more. Thanks for the help.
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 10-20-2009 at 20:02. Reason: Title correction

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    JMHO but I believe history shows that people and growing towns wiped out the really big caribou herds.The caribou with smaller numbers now do lose a larger percentage to wolfs as over half of them are gone. Also in times past most every Alaskan had taken a wolf or two but now days instead of hunting them people complain and ask the government to do what their forefathers did as a way of life,remove competition.

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    Default Information/statistics

    You might try contacting the ungulate biologists at ADF&G for info and stats. Try Bob Taube (sp?) in Glenallen or Tony Kavalok in Palmer. Both should be willing and able to assist you.

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    Default Seriously??

    Your seriously posting this as a credible statement?
    Have you ever read -Alaska's Wolf Man by Jim Rearden. You may develope a different opinion if you give it a chance. Wolf control has been around a long time. I think some of our forefathers may have hired old Frank Glaser. Not for aerial shooting but for the same reason. Eliminate some of the competition.

    Chucktruck- Look into the book mentioned above and use it for the roots of your paper. Good Luck



    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Also in times past most every Alaskan had taken a wolf or two but now days instead of hunting them people complain and ask the government to do what their forefathers did as a way of life,remove competition.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    What I ment is in your time folks don't hunt wolves,fifty years ago it was different

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    Fifty years ago it was legal to shoot wolves from an airplane with no restrictions. In fact, there was a 50 dollar bounty on each wolf, and you can believe, 50 years ago, $50 was good money.
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    Default I disagree

    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    What I ment is in your time folks don't hunt wolves,fifty years ago it was different
    Pretty much everyone that hunts out in this area will take a wolf at any given opportunity. I do my best to take a few every year as do a lot of my family and friends
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

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    Let's not call it "hunting" that's the terminology that the enemy camp uses to fight against it.

    It's predator control designed to efficiently meet a specific goal.
    Now what ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by chucktruck View Post
    Hey all. I'm writing an opinion paper for a college english class on the benefits of aerial wolf hunting and I'm looking for any facts and statistics you all can give me. I've seen alot of discussions on here about the damage wolves can do to moose/caribou populations and I'm looking for some specific cases in alaska where wolves have decimated those game populations. I need reliable, documented sources and statistics. I know Rick Kinmon has quite a few statistics in his book but I was wondering if you all know of any more. Thanks for the help.
    Please don't call it aerial wolf HUNTING...... maybe try aerial wolf control.. not trying to be a jerk or anything but those terms make all the hunters sound like we are just flying around shooting at stuff. Most of us here are fair chase hunters
    "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

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    As the last two posters have said. Their is no Aerial Wolf Hunting. Their is Predator Control, it is important to recognize the difference between the two. Predator Control is a wildlife management technique used to boost both prey AND predator populations to near the carrying capacity of an area. The shooting of wolves from aircraft is one of many techniques used to manage game populations.
    "When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it."
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    Lets see here. Shooting a wolf from a plane or helo HMMMM or put this way keeping the wolf packs in check or saying good bye to the moose and bou.. Sorry but if its up to me its going to be a bad day for the wolf population. is it hunting?? who really cares its keeping more moose and bou alive.

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    If you can get your hands on a copy of a video called "My Alaska" there is a pretty good bit on predator control in the very beginning. The footage is pretty dated but it might still be relevant. Here is the website for it-

    http://www.myalaska.com/

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    Wink Correction

    I corrected the title of the post to better reflect what the poster is inquiring about. And, I also corrected the three spelling errors of our English student. Oh hum...... sometimes being a moderator can be fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by riverboater View Post
    As the last two posters have said. There is no Aerial Wolf Hunting. There is Predator Control, and it's important to recognize the difference between the two. Predator Control is a wildlife management technique used to boost both prey, AND predator populations to near the maximum carrying capacity of an area. The shooting of wolves from aircraft is one of many techniques used to manage game populations.
    Changed one word.

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    Can anyone point me in the direction of some peer-reviewed studies that have examined the effects of predator control on prey populations? I read a lot of bluster and rhetoric on here but no solid factual evidence. I am not for or against predator control, I'm just not convinced either way.

    If everyone is so worried about the moose then why isn't there a predator control program initiated on the highways? Shooting cars from an airplane with a .500. Cars kill lots of moose. Remove the competition right?

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    F & G , Division of wildlife, should have plenty on wolf predator control.


    Off wolf topic.

    For bears the ..

    >Ballard study, 1982<

    bears vs moose calves.

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    As far as highways, The 'Alaska Moose Federation' has plenty of info.


    If your not convinced either way,
    how many elk were killed in/around Yellowstone
    BEFORE reintroducing wolves to the area.
    Simple fact, to prove a point.

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    Check out the Isle Royal Moose/Wolf Study if you are not convinced, either way. It is not predator control, but a 35 year study on the dynamics of predator prey relationships.
    "When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it."
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    Default Unit 13 vs. Unit 20

    Unit 13 is a good unit to start asking about. It used to have caribou herds almost as big as some of the ones on the northslope (circa 1930-1950). The caribou were hunted there by by both Fairbanks and Anchorage residents because it was in between the two biggest towns in alaska, and accessible by several highways, with fairly good terrain all around. Easy to access with four wheelers. A lot of people did come to just get their caribou and get out of there, without getting any wolves. Other more remote places, especially the bush, they treated wolves like rats, a varmint to be shot on sight. Thats why there's rules about baiting and poisoning wolves. So what initially decimated the herds in unit 13 was human hunting pressure. I am all for wolf control, but its an undeniable fact that human pressure brought the herds down way low. HOWEVER, the recovery of this area has been horrible, compared to other units. Part of this, is it is easy to get to unit 13 by car, but is too far from fairbanks and anchorage to fly to regularly. The fortymile herd, in unit 20 has rebounded from similar hunting pressure, because their range is much closer to fairbanks, where there is a lot of hunters and a lot of planes. Aerial predator control contributed a lot to the fortymile herd coming back in unit 20. However unit 13 has seen ridiculously slow herd growth since very few have the money to fly out there as part of the private predator control program. Now, most herds are increasing slowly due to the fact that less and less people hunt every year in this state, but predator control really does help a herd thats down bounce back up. An enormous herd loses a smaller percentage each year to predators than a small herd. From what I've heard, (from locals in cantwell who gave me all kinds of advice on how to find the wolves and kill them when I was there), is a lot more people are trapping wolves in that area to try and help the caribou and moose population, and it is SLOWLY starting to help.
    I say what everyone else says, contact fish and game, just walk into their office and start asking questions. They've always been helpful to me when I do that. But ask specifically about unit 13, compared with unit 20. That will be a good start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles-C View Post
    If everyone is so worried about the moose then why isn't there a predator control program initiated on the highways? Shooting cars from an airplane with a .500. Cars kill lots of moose. Remove the competition right?
    ***? With a response like that, you better be riding a peddle bike or the bus to school everyday.

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