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Thread: Leupold Fixed vs Varible

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    Default Leupold Fixed vs Varible

    I had a post here last week asking about the difference between the Rifleman and the VX-1 scope and appreciate all the info and i had decided on the VX-1 now i'm thinking i might just want a fixed power probably 4x i will probably never shoot over 200 yards on my Win 70 30-06 reading some of the past post i've seen that if there is a problem in the varibles it's a change of impact when changing the power..I'm open to any suggestions or comments Thanks

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have almost all variable scopes and I have no problem with a change in POI at different powers. I like to have a scope I can keep at 2 or 3x for thick brush and then run it up to 6-9x for more open areas.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I don't have a problem with shifting POI on any of my variable powered scopes. Not saying it won't happen, I just don't observe it personally.

    That said- I do like my 4X, particularly when I stay in open areas without a lot of close brush. Something simple I like about fixed powers- just put them in the crosshairs and start shooting.

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    Have both Leupold models and have never seen a problem with POI. One is a 2-7 and the other is 3-9.

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    i too like fixed power scopes, and the 4X,6X leupold are my favorites.

    even for long shots (and i mean long) 4X is ample for any hunting situation. with the exception made for iron sights, few are more durable.

    guides and shooters experienced with fixed power scopes are not handicapped in the least. on the contrary...they are more in keeping with a lightweight mountain rifle.

    as to accuracy, the 4X can define 1/4 minute targets enabling the shooter to place the bullet with precision.

    durable, accurate, small and light are reasons enough for me. give them a try. oh, yeah.....did i mention they cost less?
    happy trails.
    jh

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    I also havent had a problem with variables. I also like the fixed. Recently picked up a NIB M8 2 1/2X and just got a M8 4x.

    You cant go wrong with either style, it just depends on what your looking for.

    IMO the best hunting scopes are the VXII 1x4 and the M8 3X

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    Member Alaska Bush Hunter's Avatar
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    Thumbs up VX3 3.5x10

    I have a Leupold VX3 in 3.5x10 with Boone Crockett reticle sure works good when teamed up with leica laser Rangefinder .........on my 338 Win Win 70.

    A good rifle like the Win 70 deserves a good scope......save a few extra bucks and buy a Higher end scope. A good rifle and a cheap scope is not good advice....in Alaska.

    The Leupold VX 2.5x8 would be a excellent pick in Good steel mounts like Low Warne rings and bases .

    I too like the Fixed powder scopes especilly the Unertl Scopes I still have 2 falcons great scopes and glass as well as Leupold M8-3x.

    Best prices I have seen on the net for new Leupold scopes.......don't forget the VX3 scopes have a Lifetime warranty even on used ones.

    www.opticsplanet.com



    As for ranges......I have made shots as close as 50 yards and over 400 yards its nice to zoom up at 10X power with the 3.5x10 for the longer shots.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    i too like fixed power scopes, and the 4X,6X leupold are my favorites.

    even for long shots (and i mean long) 4X is ample for any hunting situation. with the exception made for iron sights, few are more durable.

    guides and shooters experienced with fixed power scopes are not handicapped in the least. on the contrary...they are more in keeping with a lightweight mountain rifle.

    as to accuracy, the 4X can define 1/4 minute targets enabling the shooter to place the bullet with precision.

    durable, accurate, small and light are reasons enough for me. give them a try. oh, yeah.....did i mention they cost less?
    I am usually a fan of the K.I.S.S. method when it comes to stuff. However, if you can why can't you just keep your variable power 3-9 power scope on 4X and leave yourself the option. Myself, if I have the luxury of time to turn my scope from 3X, where it rides all the time, up to 9X to shoot at an animal I am about to take I'll sure as heck take advantage of the bigger animal target to put the crosshairs on. More durable??? Never had a variable scope fail so I can't comment on that. Maybe others here have had the varible portion of their variable power scopes fail causing them to lose faith in the variable power scopes. Lighterweight?? On the average probably true. However my 3-9 Leuopold on my mountain gun is less than 10 oz which is pretty darn light in its own right. Which leaves cost...well that I can't agrue by and large, but I have bought most of my scopes used and get them for better prices than most fixed powers new.

    In the end like almost everything it comes down to personal preference and what extra options are worth you $$$ wise. To me the having the option is nice even if for a whole year my 3-9 power scope never leaves the 3 power position and I take all my animals at that power. Probably be best to figure out what you are willing to spend, look through and shoot through several scopes (both fixed and variable) from friends and figure out what your priorites are in a scope. Good luck in your search.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Default Actual vs. "Real"

    Actual POI shifts can occur in any variable scope with a second/rear plane reticle. Higher quality scopes with better QC and tolerances produce less shift as a rule, but there are no absolutes. The issue that hunters/shooters are concerned with is "Is there enough "Real" shift to make substantial impact differences down range?" The answer to this question is generally no. Having a POI shift by .125 MOA is difficult to detect from a BR at 100 yards, much less in the field. In fact, POI of less than .25 MOA would amount to less than 1 inch of shift due to equipment at 400 yards and if you can measure that amount of shift in the field you are an excellent shot indeed. The variables made by Leupold and similar manufacturers produce some POI shift, but if you can notice the shift you should return the scope under warranty. The only scope I have ever had a problem with POI shift is a 6-24 Burris Signature that rests on a very accurate 220 Swift. I returned the scope ten or twelve years ago; they reworked it and it's been flawless since.

    Front/first plane reticles cannot shift POI by design, though I personally loathe the ever growing reticle present in these scopes.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PTPAINE View Post
    I had a post here last week asking about the difference between the Rifleman and the VX-1 scope and appreciate all the info and i had decided on the VX-1 now i'm thinking i might just want a fixed power probably 4x i will probably never shoot over 200 yards on my Win 70 30-06 reading some of the past post i've seen that if there is a problem in the varibles it's a change of impact when changing the power..I'm open to any suggestions or comments Thanks
    I love fixed power scopes. They are lighter, brighter and more durable than their variable counterparts, all else being equal. I use a fairly standard rule for big game hunting and want about 1X magnification for every 100 yards of shooting range. So following this rule a 4X scope will work until 400 yards and this is about right IMO for big game. I like more target definition for varmints and variables make a lot of sense when you may shoot one animal at 50 yards and the next at 450 yards. But big game hunting gives bigger targets and less magnification works extremely well. I have and I use both kinds of scopes, but my favorite rifles tend to wear fixed scopes. If you need a ring to turn while your hunting then variables give you something to do, but if you just want a high quality sight then fixed scopes are a great choice.

    In your case the 2.5X Leupold compact is a great scope. At 6.5 ounces it's a perfect lightweight hunting scope. Some will say it's not as bright as others, and while technically true it is still bright enough for 99% of shots in the field and will be a much easier sight to handle the entire time in the field. Of course variables are fine scopes, but since I turn them to 3,4 or 5X and leave them there is no real advantage to them except they weigh more and cost more (as a rule) .

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PTPAINE View Post
    reading some of the past post i've seen that if there is a problem in the varibles it's a change of impact when changing the power..I'm open to any suggestions or comments Thanks
    Not in this day in age. At least not with anything resembling a quality scope. With a Leupold I wouldn't even consider it. This was a problem at the inception of variable power scopes, but not anymore. Get a variable. It will make your weapon much more versitile!!!! 2-7 or 3-9 range would be pretty hard to beat for an .30-06.

    Brett

  12. #12

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    i have on the m95 a leupold rifleman .1.5.x-x-6-.x-24.mm.vx7 scope for use in the diff areas that iam going to hunt ..i feel that a great range of the varialibe scope power for shots that i will take in the field ..from bush style close range to out to 400 yards max range and everything inbetween the them..the scope has a german n4 reticle


    for my 10 meter air rifle ..i have a bsa fixed power-x-4-power scope for shooting the class of international air rifle that i shoot in ..

  13. #13

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    PT: I have never had a problem with POI change in any reasonably priced, later model scope. It is not as common a problem today as it was when variables first came on the market and I donít think it will be a problem with the Leupold in your prior thread.

    The fixed power is a little more rugged by design, lighter, and usually cost a little less for comparable optics. On the down side, you do give up something in flexibility to tailor your scope to the cover and terrain in which you are hunting. I used a 4X compact for years when hunting out west on horse back because it was small, tough, I could mount it very low, and it did not get banged around as much. But it was generally open country suited to a 4X scope.

    In closer or variable cover, my personal preference in a general hunting scope is one that I can dial down to 1.5X or 2X. The larger field of view can be extremely important in close situations or with moving targets. I personally just get a better feel of the actual movement of the animal looking through a lower power scope and my shooting usually reflects this. I have also never found that 5X to 7X at the top was any real handicap in making longer shots that are generally encountered. The higher powered scopes certainly have an application in some situations but for all around hunting I just never found them as useful.

    I would suggest you think about the cover and terrain you are going to hunt and choose the one that fits best. Good luck.

  14. #14

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    i picked up the leupold 1.5.x..6.24.vxll n7 scope and rings for i wanting to change out the scope for the this one for i like the 1.5 power setting for short range and running game is a better choice in bush county ..

    i also have to say you drivers are nut case in anchorage ..

  15. #15

    Question maybe they do move...

    I have some Leupold VX III's, Vari X III's and Vari X II's. They may change point of impact if I change the power setting. But, if they do I can't tell the difference and neither can the critters. Maybe a very good marksman with one of those 1/4 inch rifles I hear about can, but me and my rifles can't. I would not be surprised to find out they do sometimes.

  16. #16
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    I am usually a fan of the K.I.S.S. method when it comes to stuff. However, if you can why can't you just keep your variable power 3-9 power scope on 4X and leave yourself the option. Myself, if I have the luxury of time to turn my scope from 3X, where it rides all the time, up to 9X to shoot at an animal I am about to take I'll sure as heck take advantage of the bigger animal target to put the crosshairs on. More durable??? Never had a variable scope fail so I can't comment on that. Maybe others here have had the varible portion of their variable power scopes fail causing them to lose faith in the variable power scopes. Lighterweight?? On the average probably true. However my 3-9 Leuopold on my mountain gun is less than 10 oz which is pretty darn light in its own right. Which leaves cost...well that I can't agrue by and large, but I have bought most of my scopes used and get them for better prices than most fixed powers new.

    In the end like almost everything it comes down to personal preference and what extra options are worth you $$$ wise. To me the having the option is nice even if for a whole year my 3-9 power scope never leaves the 3 power position and I take all my animals at that power. Probably be best to figure out what you are willing to spend, look through and shoot through several scopes (both fixed and variable) from friends and figure out what your priorites are in a scope. Good luck in your search.
    i use variable power scopes as well.......one of my favorites is the leupold 1.5X5.
    as in the earlier posts it is agreed a quality scope won't change poi with an increase (or decrease) of power. it is understood that an increase of scope power can define a target....BUT using the scope as a sight (not a binocular) a low power fixed scope is ample for hunting.

    advertising dollars go to the latest product. reticle.tube size,objective bell, etc. this is a requirement of business, as a new sale is the important one to the company.

    if you can get past the hyperbole of new advertising, check out the guides, and "professional" hunters. fixed power scopes are popular and will remain so.
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    At current count we have a 2.5x compact leupy, (2) 6X vx III's and (3) 3.5-10 vxIII's. One of these days I'll have to run multiple groups at 300 yds at various settings on the 3.5-10 to see if the zero moves with changes in power settings. I haven't seen any shift on 100 yd targets.

    Suprisingly, or maybe not, I can shoot groups just as small with the 2.5x at 100 yds as I can with the 3.5-10 cranked up to 10. The key is having a good target to hold on for small groups, but that's an asside.

    But there are times in the field when you want more magnification. If you are shooting small game at extended ranges, it's tough to make them out with a low power scope. Or, if you've found your big game bedded down, the lighting isn't so great, and you're trying to decide where to place the shot in a small opening more X isn't a bad thing.

    The only real downside of the variables is it's easy to crank it up and leave it there vs. leaving it at it's lowest setting.

    I'd also suggest keeping your eyes peeled for deals on the 6X42 leupolds. Then can be had for about the same price as the new 4x scopes, and they are a much better scope. Oh, and even if you plan to keep your shots on game to 200 yds, practice out to 300 yds. You can't have a gun that is too accurate, nor shooting skills that are too good.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    At current count we have a 2.5x compact leupy, (2) 6X vx III's and (3) 3.5-10 vxIII's. One of these days I'll have to run multiple groups at 300 yds at various settings on the 3.5-10 to see if the zero moves with changes in power settings. I haven't seen any shift on 100 yd targets.
    It takes a very accurate rifle to display the POI shift on most good quality scopes at 100 yards. I think this is primarily why shooters never see a shift, not because it doesn't exist. The POI shift is within the abilities of the rifle and therefore are statistically insignificant.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Suprisingly, or maybe not, I can shoot groups just as small with the 2.5x at 100 yds as I can with the 3.5-10 cranked up to 10. The key is having a good target to hold on for small groups, but that's an asside.
    I agree completely when comparing groups off of the BR. Magnification is not unimportant in shooting, but with a proper target it is not as significant as other factors.

  19. #19

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    I have to agree with defining a target. I can hit 4' clays at 200 yards with my VXIII 1.5-5 it is a fine scope for where I use it. Say 10-150 yards so the larged FOV is imparative. Just and only to know just how tight of groups this gun and my hand loads are capable of is the only reason I might put a higher power scope on it just for grins and not for hunting. But 5X is all I realy need for 200 yards shots an deer sized game.

    I have a 1-4 on a 336D and have done 7/8" 5 shot groups. Some times its 1.5" ,but I don't sweet it its my 150 yard or less gun so it is fine. The other rifle is a 358win with a match barrel so I am curious. I may need a 2-7 for a trip where 300 yards could happen and if this gun will do it, its a go to gun for handling alone.

    In short I would need say 9x or 10x just for at the target range for confidance in my groups lil tight ones but not for my big game hunting. My top end powers are 4x, 5x, two 7x's(270&ML), & two 9x's (22- hornet&22LR).

  20. #20
    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    I agree with Paul. Phil Schumacher swears by his 2.5. I own a 2x7 VX2 and it has worked wonderfully. Most of the time it is set on 2 or 4. Next scope for my 338 will probably be a 2.5x. Jim

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