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Thread: Any Pinzgauer Owners Out There?

  1. #1
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default Any Pinzgauer Owners Out There?

    Mine Will Be Here In A Week ,
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    I have a good friend back in GA that has one. AWESOME machine! I havent seen any since I moved up here though.

  3. #3

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    Looks good! Who makes those? I ran out to Knik glacier on the wheeler Saturday and that closed cockpit looks nice and warm! :-)
    Mike
    Mike
    www.alaskaatvclub.org
    There is a faster way off the mountain, might hurt a little though.

  4. #4
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    I've Seen A Picture On Web Of One In Anchorage- A 6 Wheel Model
    Mine Has 87 Hp Air Cooled 4 Cyl. Engine, So Heat Is At A Premium But I Have A Multi-fuel Aux. Heater I Will Be Putting In It.
    Maker-of Mine Is Styer-damiler-puch In Austria
    They Are Now Made In England ......new One Is $135,000 But Can Not Be Imported To The Usa Until 25 Years Old.
    Mine Is A 1973 Model 710m
    Looking At A Knik River Trip Some Time This Winter Will Be A Drive From Soldotna Thou. And I Would Like To Get A Winch Before I Make The Trip.

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    Default canvas or hard top

    Nimrod, does yours have the canvas top covering the "cargo/passenger" area or is it a full hard top?? I imagine its a cold ride with canvas and the lack of heat due to an air cooled engine. heat was never much of a problem with my buddies.

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    Default Pinzi

    There's a guy selling them just a few miles from me here in Kalifornia. I've been investigating them for some time now and the only thing keeping me from getting one is they are LOUD. I understand that headsets are a must if you are going to have any kind of conversation in one.
    The wife puts up with a lot but she drew the line at this one.

    The "off roadability" is great I'm told. Hard to beat air cooled when you shut down in subzero temps.

    Please keep us posted.

  7. #7
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default Got It Home :-)

    Yes It Is Canvas Top Some Guys Get Insulated Tops Made....$3300.00 :-( For Complete Top.
    I Plan On Making An Alumium Insulated Top And Have A Multi-fuel Aux. Heater That Will Need To Be Installed When I Get The Vent Kit. The 710"k" Model Is The Hard Top Version. Mine Is 710m
    They Are Noisey But A Variety Of Things Can Be Done To Quiet Them Down. Really Not Terrible as Is Would Be Tiring On Long Trip.
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    Maybe im a lil naive here.What does this rig do that a beefed up 4x4 truck cant do.It still has four tires and can get high centered like any other rig.Parts must be at a premium.Just curious......

  9. #9
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Talking

    Maybe Nothing A Beefed Up P/u But This Is Stock-
    Much Higher, Different Axle System, Lockers, Will Climb 70% Grade And Sidehill 40% Grade, Tight Turning Radius, Narrower.
    Beefed Up P/u Would Be More Money Unless You Get A New Pinzgauer ($135,000), 14-15 Mpg, And It's Unique And A Head Turner
    Parts Can Be Pricey.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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  10. #10

    Default Looks cool.

    But my $3,000 lifted 91 toyota could almost keep up with it. And I don't have to trailer my toyota. Can you make that street legal?

    On the other hand, I do think it's a cool rig. If you make a hard top and mount a chair on top it would be a good hunting rig in certain places.

  11. #11
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default YES it is street legal

    i was just too big of a sissy britches to try and drive it 3300 miles in cold weather with air cooled engine heater at 50-55 mph. day before i was going to drive it my B-I-L offered to trailer it to another B-I-L 's in Alberta so i did it that way. then my son and i made the 80 hr tound trip run to Dawson Creek to get it. that was with a 12 hour lay over at DC. only slept 4 hrs there. WOW what a trip MT. DEW, NO FEAR ENERGY DRINKS AND 5 HR ENERGY BOOST DRINKS ASSISTED.

    i think biggest limitation with this will be my driving ability and guts to try stuff with it.
    plan is to make it an insulated hard top. but no chair.
    710 k models ( radio truck ) have a gun turrent hatch on passenger side so you could easily stand.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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  12. #12
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default

    ANOTHER PICTURE
    WITH NEW WHEELS AND THE BIGGER TIRES
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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  13. #13
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    Default Nice

    Hi,

    I'm looking at a Mog right now. Any advice on up keep for one of these. They seem to be similar in many ways. Thanks

    Ron

  14. #14
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    typically these are alot smaller than the unimogs. older pinz like mine are all air cooled gas engines. but yes i think there are alot of things very similar. ...never had a unimog so i can not be specific
    luckily my son is a mechanic and he keeps it up. just minor routine maintnace and " upgrades" on mine to this point. i have not had it long. for the most part seems fairly simple to do things on the pinzgauers i would think the unimogs are similar,
    Cold War Remarketing in Littleton , Colo or expedition imports in Vallejo (sp), CA could tell you more as they work on both . Linden Engineering in Golden , Colo also could answer that
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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  15. #15
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    Default Pinzgauer owner.....in Africa

    My name is Steve Tolan. I live in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia and have just bought a 1995 4x4 Pinzgauer hardtop (i.e. no side windows or doors) in England for use here.

    My wife Anna and I emigrated to Zambia in 1998 from the UK. Before we went, I had to decide what vehicle to take, as we had no idea where we were going to settle down, so planned on having to bush-camp for up to 3 years. I was very close to buying a mid-1970’s Pinzgauer 4x4, but I was (wrongly) informed by the Zambian High Commission in London that Zambia wouldn't allow the import of a LHD vehicle, so reluctantly I bought a Land Rover 130 doublecab, fully rebuilt to my design and specification, with a new engine, body design, etc.

    Having collected the vehicle at Walvis Bay in Namibia, we entered western Zambia a month later. Fate then led us to the far eastern side of Zambia, to the Luangwa Valley near Mfuwe, opposite one of the best game parks in the whole of Africa, South Luangwa National Park. On the third day of arriving in the Valley, we discovered a beautiful spot on the Luangwa River, with a 2-mile view of the wide river, full of hippos and crocodiles, and with herds of elephant wading across the river, to and from the park. We fell in love with the idyllic spot and camped there…..and never left. Within 3 weeks we met the local chief and told him of our dream to build a wildlife education centre, to teach the local children about wildlife and conservation. He was so impressed with our idea, he gave us the site we were camping on….for free!

    After battling red tape for a year or so, we finally were granted permission to build our centre, which opened in 2001 and it has been running successfully ever since. We also look after all orphaned animals (including baby elephants) in the area, and are involved in anti-poaching and forestry protection. Please see www.chipembele.org for more details.

    The Land Rover gave us many problems over the next 10 years and needed lots of spares to keep it going, so recently I’d decided to buy a new Toyota Land Cruiser to replace it, although I wasn’t totally happy it was the best choice, but the only alternative I felt I had, certainly within Zambia.

    I do a lot of palaeontological and archaeological exploration in the Luangwa Valley, and am often going deep into the bush on my own, and so must have a dependable vehicle that is very capable offroad, with plenty of storage space inside and a good fuel range. A couple of years ago I went to an area so remote that the (older) local people had last seen a white person there 43 years ago, when a fossil expedition (whose route I was following) passed through the area!

    Where we live is in pristine bush and is very wild. We often have lions, leopards, buffalo, Cape hunting dogs, giraffe, antelope, warthogs, baboons, monkeys, etc., etc. coming right to our house. Sadly, our last driver/mechanic, Mabvuto, was killed by a herd of elephants as he cycled to work last September. We are 10 miles from the settlement of Mfuwe, where the basic necessities can be bought, otherwise it’s a 450+ drive to the capital, Lusaka, for supplies!

    In December 2008 I went to visit friends and relatives in the UK. I had no thought of looking for another vehicle, but whilst in Scotland, visiting a game-keeper friend near Inverness, I read one of his Scottish Gamekeeper magazines and saw an advert for Pinzgauers for sale in England. It reminded me of the time when I’d nearly bought one, 10+ years earlier.

    The following day I drove just over 400 miles to the garage in the Shropshire countryside and looked at the vehicles they had for sale. They had a good choice of various 4x4’s and 6x6’s, mostly older models with petrol engines, and all LHD. I liked the idea of extra space offered by a 6x6, but as I need to cross a small floating pontoon across the Luangwa, I contacted the professional hunter who operates the pontoon and he confirmed that it was too small to hold the 6x6. So, it had to be a 4x4, but as I wanted a more recent model than they had in stock, I left empty-handed. However, the trip had not been in vain, as it had re-ignited my interest in Pinzgauers, and I decided not to buy the Toyota after all!

    Back at my sister's house in Wales, I spent several hours searching the internet to look for other Pinzgauers for sale in the UK, but only found one, which wasn’t right. Fortunately, later that day I drove 20 miles to the nearest town and bought a Land Rover magazine, hoping to find a Pinzgauer for sale. I did better than that, I found 2, at the same dealer. I phoned up to be told that they were both sold, but I didn’t let a little detail like that to put me off! As I was about to return to Africa, this was to be my only chance to look at a recent model Pinzgauer, and I wasn’t going to miss the chance to have a look.

    I drove 160 miles there the following day and found the two vehicles were in excellent condition. Not only that, there were no side doors or windows, nor even a window in the back door, so security in the load area was excellent (a big consideration when I park the vehicle and walk off into the bush all day, leaving the vehicle in the middle of nowhere). They were alsop fitted with a long, narrow roofrack, ideal for what I wanted; the carrying of two spare tyres. Even better, they were both RHD (as all vehicles are in Zambia), and a nice bushy green in colour. Had I been asked to design my ‘dream Pinzgauer', these two would have been it!

    They were both 1995 ex-Royal Air Force vehicles, and, for some reason, had been decommissioned early. One had 32,000 + Km on the clock, and was in the best condition of the two, and which became my choice. The standard engine in recent models is a turbo-charged VW engine, just 2,383 cc. The other great thing about these engines is the far better economy (mid-low 20's mpg), plus they have a far bigger diesel tank than earlier models, both combining to give a much greater range; a big consideration in Africa, with fuel difficult to find. Some more recent Pinzgauers with these engines are fitted with automatic gearboxes, but these were fitted with a 5-speed manual box, also my preference.

    I was told that they’d been sold to an overseas buyer for 35,000.....each! Fortunately for me, the sale had stalled, so two days later I managed to buy one for a lot cheaper. I know it will last far better than my Land Rover has, be far better off-road, and be ideally suited for camping and expedition work.

    I’m arranging for 2 year’s worth of spares (all filters, disc pads, fan belts, etc., plus a Pinzgauer handbook and workshop CD-Rom) to be loaded inside the vehicle. It will then be put in a 20-foot container and shipped to Durban, South Africa, where I’ll meet it at the docks and arrange for it to be transported to the border with Zimbabwe, from where I’ll drive it home.

    In addition to expedition work, it will be used during the rainy season to battle through deep mud, pot-holes, washed-out tracks and steep river crossings around collapsed bridges, to collect children from the local schools and get them here for a day’s teaching, before returning them in the late afternoon.

    Steve (e-mail info@chipembele.org)
    Last edited by Chipembele; 01-13-2009 at 06:14. Reason: spelling mistakes, add e-mail

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    Quote Originally Posted by danthedewman1 View Post
    Maybe im a lil naive here.What does this rig do that a beefed up 4x4 truck cant do.It still has four tires and can get high centered like any other rig.Parts must be at a premium.Just curious......
    The bid difference is portals vs. conventional differentials. With a conventional truck your ground clearance is limited to the bottom of the differential. Sure you can re-gear the diffs and put on big tires, but then you need to upgrade the engine to turn the big tires, and then add bigger brakes to stop them, and they start breaking the axles and have to go to a heavier duty diff, which reduces ground clearance, and then requires bigger tires, brakes and engine.

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