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Thread: waders

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    Default waders

    What waders/hip boots do you guys use?? I have a pair bib-waders that I use in the lower 48 for duck hunting but not sure if I want to haul them all the way up to AK. Also they get hot if I am not sitting in waist deep water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by watkinsba View Post
    What waders/hip boots do you guys use?? I have a pair bib-waders that I use in the lower 48 for duck hunting but not sure if I want to haul them all the way up to AK. Also they get hot if I am not sitting in waist deep water.
    A pair I have been eyeing are Wiggy's pull over waders. Anybody use these? Kinda curious how durable they are. I would had to get a hole punched in them as I hop out of the raft at the first gravel bar.

  3. #3

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    Anyone ever use or seen the Muck™ Woody Bayou Hip Boots with the wader attachment to them? You can roll them down and secure them with a button and use them as regular boots. Would be good for swampy hunts and/or waterfowl hunts.

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by watkinsba View Post
    What waders/hip boots do you guys use?? I have a pair bib-waders that I use in the lower 48 for duck hunting but not sure if I want to haul them all the way up to AK. Also they get hot if I am not sitting in waist deep water.
    Those are actually the kind you probably want up here.

    I have a set of Cabela's reversible 5mm neoprene stocking foot chest waders.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...set=ISO-8859-1
    Now what ?

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    anybody else agree with the chest waders on a moose/caribou hunt in August?

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by watkinsba View Post
    anybody else agree with the chest waders on a moose/caribou hunt in August?

    Nope.

    You didn't state what your intended use for said waders was.
    Now what ?

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    Yeah that is what I thought. SImply for the pain in the butt to get in and out of and sheer not breathing. I would be hating life sittiing in a boat for a few hours in them. I would end up with an innertube floating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by watkinsba View Post
    What waders/hip boots do you guys use?? I have a pair bib-waders that I use in the lower 48 for duck hunting but not sure if I want to haul them all the way up to AK. Also they get hot if I am not sitting in waist deep water.
    During duck season.....this is some bone chilling cold, wet, rainy, nasty weather (that's when ducks come down low). Don't get me wrong.....I love the cold but I was miserable with my Lacrosse Hippers. They only have 800 grams of insulation and I had some cold cold toes. Next time out duck huntin.....I'll def. be wearing some heavily insulated chest waders for that specific purpose.

    With that said.....my " everywhere" Alaskan footwear is my Lacrosse hippers.....tough as nails and boy can I put some miles on those in comfort! The 800 grams of thinsulate ultra and the air bob sole makes for a good all around piece of gear for multiple uses.

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    Default Cabela's Tundra Hip Boots

    Anyone get a chance to try out the new Cabela's Tundra Hip Boots yet? Looks and sounds like they would be perfect for alaska hunting but I want to get some first hand accounts of their reliability.

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    Default Depends...

    on what you are hunting and hunt conditions. But overall, I don't think you can beat the Lacrosse hippers mentioned above. General, do-all boot. I rely on mine and never let me down yet. If you are moving much at all, I think you'd be miserable in neoprene or light chest waders even. If you are setting in a boat all day in October, get neoprene chest waders. Like I said, it really depends on the use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Carter View Post
    Anyone get a chance to try out the new Cabela's Tundra Hip Boots yet? Looks and sounds like they would be perfect for alaska hunting but I want to get some first hand accounts of their reliability.
    I was up in Scarborough, Maine just the other day and tried on a pair. Can't speak for the reliability of course, but they seemed to be of very high quality. The rubber boots seemed to offer decent ankle support, the material that made up the legs was lightweight, and the straps to attach to your belt seemed well thought out and secure. Had they came in size 15, I would own a pair, but they only had it in size 14. The material is similar (or same) to some Cabelas "Dry Plus" camo rubber boot waders I have used for a few years on float trips in Alaska. These are NW arctic floats in Aug and Sept and I wear thermal polartec Cabelas pants under them. Up top, I have an undershirt and a windproof fleece pullover (under the wader straps). This was a very comfortable setup on 7-13 day float trips in NW. If it rains, I put a shell on top of the wader straps. Works well. These are good waders and most importantly, they breath. Something that may be of utility to the OP if looking for full length waders. They come in regular and stout, also in pants or full waders. Link below...


    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...0033341830661a


    Whatever you do, take the advice before me and avoid neoprene. I would slam my pecker in a door before spending another week in neoprene waders. Did that on my first float trip to NW Alaska. Never again.


    Below is me sweating bullets in my neoprene, 80 miles N of Kotz in Aug, nearly having a heat stroke in the arctic




    Below is a cooler (and drier) version of Dan the following year on a nearby river in late Aug. This time in Cabelas "Dry Plus" pants...




    And a picture of a comfortable Dan in the full length Cabelas "Dry Plus" waders...

    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Thumbs up LaCross Hip Boots

    watkinsba,

    LaCross hip boots, the Big Chief style, air bob sole with 800MG of insulation is the normal boot for tundra hunts in AK.

    My recommendation is the result of dealing with about 100+ client-hunters in the last 12 years. The LaCross hip boots are hard to get for those of you in the lowere 48. Because of that, many client hunters end up with Cabelas hip boots. And because I can get by with both size 10 or 11 hip boots, I have ended up with several pair of Cabelas hip boots when client-hunters leave AK. Regardless of style, none of the Cabelas hip boots are as comfortable to me as the LaCross Big Chief style.

    The wrong foot wear, the wrong boots have led to more problems in the bush than any other single thing. Hip boots are never perfect in every situation, but at the end of every hunt the guys without hip boots say they would not return to AK without 'em. The guys without LaCross hip boots say they would not return without LaCross.

    The knock on hip boots are that they get wet inside from sweaty feet. True. And I did not care for them at the end of a 16 mile hike on a super warm September day after we got to chasing after a big caribou.

    But most of the time they are the most important single item, along with great rain gear, that will contribute to the success of a tundra hunt for moose, caribou, and bears. If you are gonna sit in a boat or a riverside blind all day or just raft or just fish, then it probably does not matter what type of waterproof footwear you have. But if you are an active spot-and-stalk or run-and-gun hunter....get hip boots, pref LaCross.

    So the sweat deal is the negitive point. Here are the positive points.
    1) Keeps your feet and legs dry.
    2) No time wasting boot changes while racing to cut off a traveling brown bear. Keep in mind that the tundra often has many wet spots and muskeg swamps that look dry until you are knee deep in 'em. (I have saw guys waste 30 minutes changing in and out of boots five times in only a mile...)
    3) On dry ground, fold 'em down to keep your legs cool.
    4) On windy days pull 'em up to keep the wind off your legs.
    5) During those cold days sitting on a lookout hill, stick your hands down your hip boots to keep 'em warm.

    Client-hunters will always debate the merit of LaCross hip Boots as opposed to breathable-pant-waders or as opposed to hiking boots and quick-change-overboots. I have heard the verbal opposition to hip boots so many times that I now, after one or two hip-boot sales talks, I just tell to bring whatever they want. But at the end of a hard day, and at the end of the hunt I know that every client-hunter says he wishes he had listened to me and brought LaCross hip boots.

    (Also, check the gear forum and hunting forum archives....and whatever type of boot you want to wear will be supported....somewhere.)

    ...in my experience...in my humble opinion...

    Dennis
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    Great post Dennis,

    Couldn't have said it any better myself. I learned real quick that constantly changing out footwear was rediculous.......so I just started wearing the Hippers full time. It's the only way to go IMO. I'll prob. never do the neos over shoes....they are only like a few ounces lighter than a tough set of lacross hippers. In the colder part of the season when it starts getting chilly.......I switch to felt soles.....makes a big difference in retaining warmth while absorbing moisture too. 3 hard seasons on mine.....still in perfect condition. I too never understood the logic of those who oppose lacross hippers......you would think that they are the obvious choice.

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    Thumbs up LaCross Tough!

    mainer in AK,
    Like you mentioned, the LaCross boots are tough. The only time I have ripped them was when I snagged some moose ribs that I had just axed out. Unlike other brands of hip boots, I have not ever, not yet, got any holes from them beaver "punji" sticks that lurk everywhere near water. But I have saw every other brand get holes from sharp sticks.
    I get about 3 seasons out of them.

    While there is no perfect world, the LaCross boots are the best all-around choice for most tundra and river bottom hunting situations.

    Look at any guide camp. Nine out of ten guides will have LaCross hip boots. The tenth guide will have Cabelas hip boots that he got from his last client-hunter.

    ...nuf said...others may agree or disagree....(but we are right)

    Dennis

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    Default Hint Taken

    Danattherock,
    Thanks for the info on the cabela's hip boots... Seems everyone swears by the lacrosse boots though and well if they're that popular, they must be doing something right. I believe there is a pair of lacrosse's in my future! Thanks all for the advice!

  16. #16

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    The Wiggys lighweight waders are not made for hunting long term and were designed mainly for crossing streams and creeks, like you would on a back pack sheep hunt. I'd also recommend the LaCrosse Big Chief hip boots, been wearing them for close to 5 years now and they are finally starting to get worn out. I even wear them on all my 4 wheeling trips, they make crossing rivers a snap and are warm and comfy. There aren't any boots IMO that are comfy for walking on tundra but these come d a m n close.

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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Carter View Post
    Danattherock,
    Thanks for the info on the cabela's hip boots... Seems everyone swears by the lacrosse boots though and well if they're that popular,!

    There you go, running with the pack

    Kidding of course. Consider putting some high quality gel insoles in any boot/wader you decide on. I find they make them much more comfortable, especially if that boot should be a tad on the big size. Below is one I have used in many hiking/work/wader boots....


    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___17980




    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Default Will Do...

    Well you know what they say... there's security in numbers! so maybe staying with the pack ain't so bad after all And I'll have to give those insoles a try... I'm in afghanistan right now and can't think of any better place for a trial run for 'em than the mountains of a-stan.

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    Thumbs up Mountains?

    G,
    Concerning the mountains of a-stan....we never said hip boots were the top choice for any mountain work. But I do believe they are the best overall choice for Alaska tundra work. And yes, gel or felt insole inserts can help keep 'em warmer and take the edge off rocks and reduce stone bruised feet while packing out a raw 100+ pound brown bear pelt.

    dennis

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    Default understood...

    I understand... I couldn't wear hip boots here even if I wanted to. they just aren't very tactical no I was saying I would give the insoles a try while I am here.

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