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Thread: Favorite Dry Bags

  1. #1
    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    Default Favorite Dry Bags

    Hey all. im still trying to do all my research before my purchases in the spring. what dry bags do you like most and what makes them better than the next. also do you like several small bags or a few big bags to pack on the raft. thanks and any info would be great. vance

  2. #2

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    pretty tough to beat nrs's 3.8 bill's bags for camping gear,clothes,food bags that get stowed for the day. the backpack straps are great for portages or just hauling gear into camp.
    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...00&deptid=1630

    i also like a dry duffle for just gear you need easy access to during the day. Stuff like a first aid kit, rain gear,snacks,ect. These bags are pricey but great for ease of use. I use these guys and love them...very easy to see everything inside and easy to secure but retain access from the top.
    http://www.bodyglove.com/products_de...roduct_id=7797

    you should also get some smaller dry bags for raft repair kit, first aid kit and your pin kit too.
    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...45&deptid=1630

    i'd go for as many large bags as possible. they are quicker/better to secure and less trips into camp or for portages. the raft will be cleaner from a safety standpoint too.

  3. #3

    Default Dry bag considerations

    NRS Bills bags with pack straps are great. We use them every chance we get. The only thing to think about is if you are going to fly on smaller planes like super cubs, you will need other small gym-type bags to put gear into so they fit on the plane and then have to do a transfer at the river.

    For expensive electronics, we like the double ziplock-style Watershed bags.

    Good luck.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Large bags have a lot of advantages, as has been mentioned, but they also have their drawbacks. The primary one being that the deeper they are the harder they are to get to the bottom of. If I can't find what I'm looking for near the top I revert to dumping the whole bag out. So my bag of choice is wide, like a large Bill's Bag, but shorter.

    I have found Sotar bags to be well built. The straps never rip out and they seal well. Goo Vogt usually has several he sells dirt cheap at his Sotar booth at the Sportsman Show. That's, what, only for months away?


    I also like the light weight coated nylon bags for some smaller uses. I've only recently started using them, and am not sure how they will hold up in the long term, but they are easy to roll up since the material is so pliable. Also, they add very little weight to the gear. They worked well for day bags on my recent Grand Canyon trip. After 3 weeks of constant use they are still in great condition, and were easy to pack in suit cases before & after.

  5. #5

    Default Dry bags and double bagging

    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoKings View Post
    For expensive electronics, we like the double ziplock-style Watershed bags.
    Good luck.

    I've used the Seal Line dry bags from Cascade Designs for years. I had several sizes but the one I use the most is the Pro Pack with the double bottom and pack harness. http://www.seallinegear.com/packs.as...y=PacksDuffles

    The Pro Packs are very durable and I think they have one of the best roll top seals for this style dry bag.

    Iíve also seen some dry bags at the Anchorage Sportsman show that have dry suit style waterproof zippers on them. These look like they are extremely watertight. I havenít priced them yet but I do know the dry suit zippers are expensive so Iím guessing the dry bags with this type zipper would be on the top end of pricing too.

    I've also started using the new Hefty one Zip jumbo 2.5-gallon Storage bags in side my large dry bags. With the zip lock design I can put my extra cloths inside the clear bag and roll the air out, then zip lock the bag closed to create a vacuum inside. This way your bulky items don't take up as much space inside your bigger dry bag and they are all double sealed. This also helps in the packing and unpacking process when youíre trying to find things in the bottom of deeper backpacks style dry bags.

    I have had durability problems with the clear vinyl seal line bags. They seem to crack after a year or so along the edge of the first fold of the seal. Iíve also had a leaky bottle of Benís 100-bug dope eat through the clear Vinyl before. It was pretty messy!!


    Good boating

    Jim King
    Alaska Series Inflatable Boats,
    Commercial quality at Wholesale prices
    River Rafts, Catarafts, Inflatable Kayaks, Inflatable Canoes, Inflatable Sport Boats, Inflatable Jet Boats, Tenders and Dinghies.
    WWW.alaskaseries.com
    (907) 248-2900

  6. #6
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Gobi waterproof backpack

    I just bought two Gobi waterproof backpacks for my canoe/flyfishing trip on the Goodnews in Bristol Bay this coming Aug. I took two trips on lower Noatak tribs in the last 3 years and had mixed results with the dry bags I took. Not all worked and some were just inconvenient to lug around for 13 days setting up camp/breaking camp/getting to stuff I needed. I found these very large backpacks on Sierra trading post online and they were half the price of the same bag elsewhere. I just got them in and they are incredible. Very nice backpack with comfortable straps and well padded. The material is very thick. This would be great for portaging or just hauling the gear to campsite and back each day. I have not tested them yet, but they appear to be well worth the $140 they sell for. I got them for $70 on Sierra trading post. They only have them in yellow. But I prefer that anyway. It will make them easier to recover if they take a different route than the canoe down river. Super nice bags and at half price, I would suggest them to anyone. Lots of room. Lots. They come in small, med, and large I think. I got the large and it appears to be about 6,000 ci. Here is the link.
    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/4...-Outdoor-.html

  7. #7

    Default Clavey River bags

    Check out the Clavey river bags they are much tougher then the NRS bags. Reinforced bottoms and larger. I have used both and highly favor the Clavey bags.
    http://www.clavey.com/gear_bags.html

    Kent Rotchy
    Rocking R Designs
    The Oar Saddle
    www.oarsaddle.com

  8. #8
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    Default

    Dry bags for all seasons, all sports, all terrain, all travel, in all shapes/sizes/materials...

    As far as closure on medium to larger bags Sea-line as Jim King related are the best!!! Their only low cards are ease of entry (go figure eh!) and not industry leading hardware on the straps, D-rings etc. In the medium to large personal bag tho' - this is my choice.

    The NRS or Bills Bags are a reasonable close second - however they lack the closure feature of the Sealine and fabric tends to tear at the mouths. Older Bills Bags that had the REI name had tougher bottoms by far but even weaker closures w/ no reinforcement. High cards are more stout material than most, NRS standing behind the product, and better hardware in addition to straps than the Sealine. Bills Bags have an entry issue as well and hard to sort out your stuff problem - same as the Sealine

    KOSS Bags by NRS and similar by the company Kent mentioned, Clavey are really useful extra large bags with an extra top cover for big stuff or consolidating several smaller bags, odds or ends, and stuff like pumps, repair, etc. Keeps the gear from disorganization, very efficient for #1 color is camp, #2 color is kitchen, and #3 is assorted other stuff etc. Downsides are over stuffing, overweight, and fit into confined space.

    There are other bags out there... Watershed and bags like Ortleib (Cordura with a waterproof lining) I do not recommend as completely dry bags season in/season out... harder Commercial use. They leak over a short period of time (pin-hole problems to an extreme!). They are harder to repair than just a good ol’ proven PVC patching!!! High cards tho' are easy entry, easy fold up, super cold weather flexibility, and they slide into confined space smoothly. They also slip into kayaks and bigger PVC dry-bags like a charm.

    Also take a look at SOTAR bags… good materials and industry leading hardware.

    "Expensive Electronics" and such should not go in dry-bags!!! - If at all preventable. Quite simply armored, waterproof, floatable, highly secure even lockable and purgeable hard-case protection with a guaranty provides far superior protection!!! Humidity alone in a dry-bag should be anybody’s wake up call... just check out a clear dry bag some time on a trip… as it routinely no matter the weather will fog within due to even just temp and pressure differences from inside bag to the outside air. A nice touch is redundancy – take your electronics… bag ‘em & box ‘em. This would not be overkill and would provide double duty when your electronics are carried independent of the water box or ammo can.

    Sizes??? Think bigger volume than what you need - this makes for better closure on bags like the Sealine, Bills, and the likes. As far as small vs. large? Depends on the use and the confining spaces. Also depends on loading and unloading efficiency in addition to specified organization.

    Hope some of this helps -

    - oh and PS... back pack straps on anything make freighting easier on the medium to larger sizes --- and try to avoid the bad habit of picking up any dry bags loaded by/from their closures!!!


    Brian Richardson
    http://www.northernrim.com
    Last edited by Brian Richardson; 12-19-2006 at 23:36. Reason: forgot something to add that was important

  9. #9
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    Default What did you purchase

    Just wondering if you made your purchase yet. I am also looking to purchase several bags for an upcoming float sheep hunt this fall.

  10. #10
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Poor Man's Dry Bag

    Quote Originally Posted by tv321 View Post
    Just wondering if you made your purchase yet. I am also looking to purchase several bags for an upcoming float sheep hunt this fall.
    Here's a plan, especially for a sheep hunt, where weight is a critical factor.

    Purchase some nylon grain sacks at Alaska Mill and Feed in Anchorage for about a buck apiece, and line them with a trash compactor bag. Load your stuff in the compactor bag, twist the top around on itself and double the top over. Tie it off with parachute cord and do the same with the outer bag. Now you've got a bag that weighs nearly nothing, costs nearly nothing, and is rugged enough for several hunts. I use regular dry bags too, but this trick has saved me lots of money and is especially nice when weight is an issue.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
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  11. #11

    Default Dry Bags

    I love my Watershed bags with their ziplock openings. With their duffle type design, there is no standing on your head to get to the bottom of the bag, which is where anything you are looking for is.

    I have used almost every bag on the market including the NRS Bill's bag and most will keep your gear dry if rolled correctly. IMHO The easiest to roll of all the roll closure bags is the Jack's Plastic Welding bags.

    Lori

  12. #12

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    I bought a few of those cheapo dry bags at wally world and they are pretty decent for the money. like all the others if you have a dry rub they will show wear, but of the 5 I bought in 03' only one is leaking and I was not very nice to it. they are not bills bags but they are lighter and less bulky......oh and 1/5 the price.

  13. #13
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    I've got to chime in with one more vote for the watershed bags, that ziplock closure is sure nice to be able to get to your gear without tearing the entire bag apart. I've got two, have had one of those since March 2003 and have used it a minimum of 75 days since then and can happily report zero problems that weren't my fault...like forgetting to make sure the bag was all the way closed. They are a bit spendy but in my opinion, worth it.

  14. #14
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    Default

    The NRS dry bags are as good, if not better, than any on the market and more reasonably priced than most.

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