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Thread: Looking for Gilpatricks laker pics

  1. #1

    Default Looking for Gilpatricks laker pics

    I haved searched extensivly for photos of Gill Gilpatricks square backed laker canoe. I seen the name here searching through the forums. Does anyone have any pics? Just dont want to buy the book to find its not what I am looking for.

    Anyone have any experience with this design to share?

    I like the Rob White sportboat but its only 16ft. Also interested in www.Compumarine.com power designs, but they are only 15ft.

  2. #2

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    I don't believe Gilpatrick has ever built a square stern canoe. In his book he said he only included a picture, description, and plans because other people he knew and respected spoke highly of the design. If you do a search for Grand Laker canoe you will see canoes built with rib and canvas. I believe his it is the same size and shape but Gilpatrick provides drawings to build the stations for a stripper version. The book is a good source of information even if you don't build the laker.

  3. #3
    Member ptarmigan's Avatar
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    I grew up in downeast Maine where these canoes come from. I visited some of the shops in town as a kid when we would fish Grand Lake Stream for salmon. Not sure where to find the info you are looking for but I bet if you visit www.flyfishinginmaine.com and ask around that someone on there will have the answer for you.

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    I have the book, Have seen one or two built on Gil's design , I don't like it, it is not deep enough, or wide enough, for me. Don't get me wrong, may be this design is what your looking for, or possibility the builder did not follow the design totally.
    Gil is a great guy, a good builder and easy to talk to. I would recommend looking up his contact info he on the Maine professional guides web page, and e-mail/ask him. I bet he dose have a lot of pic and would send them to you.
    Others around here talk about the strength of the strip wood canoe (With a motor/in big waves) in a laker design, with no stem and not much support to the transom, If I built one I would have a full lenth keel on it and more support/braceing put into the transom. I can tell you grand lakers are very common here, but being built as a strip canoe is not, I feel there has to be a reason for this, strippers are a lot easier to make, then angain maybe to many of us are set in our ways and hard headed. To make things fair, I must tell you, I build a rib and plank 20 ft model so I do lean that way a bit. If you want I can dig up the book and get you a bunch of measurements, but you would be much father ahead to talk to Gil directly.

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the good information again.

    The super sized motor canoe is just where my hunt for a camper topable hand launchable boat design always ends up pointing to. I would just go buy a Scott albany or james but they are over that 200lb mark. Trying to get something similar under 150lb mark and 10-15hp able.

    And being a canoe guy, whats not to like about these lakers.

    However lately I have been pondering the compumarine.com cedar strip motor hulls, however their length is only 14ft. Still waiting for info from the designer on lengthening to 16 or 18.

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    I don't think you are going to save any weight going with a strip wood canoe. The strip wood canoes are made with at least 3 layers of fiberglass and cloth, 2 1/2 out side and at least 1 inside, it is a fiber glass canoe the ceder is just the form for the fiberglass. Where rib and plank canoes which were originally just covered with canvas, have only 1 or 1 1/2 layers of fiberglass with the 1/2 layers going on the bottom for extra protection. I would be willing to bet that a strip wood and rib and plank canoe built the same size would be withen 20 lbs maybe the strip wood a bit heavier. I have built a few 18ft white's, strip wood canoes, on Gils plans, they are really heavey and are tippier than need be, IMO, I leave them in at remote hike in ponds, If I was to build something like this today it would be a copy of a OT tripper 17ft. If I was going to build a small square stern; I would be looking at copying a 20 ft OT tripper, cutting it back to say 17ft, on the form. I may do something like this this winter. This would make a fair car topper, but would be quite heavey, for one guy to load unload.
    One big advantage of strip wood canoe building is it is easy to copy lines from another canoe and build a form. I think Gil's book goes into depth about this. I also know it goes into depth about modifying a canoe you like to something bigger or smaller. When your thinking about this just rember canoes grow and shrink from the center/ middle, and not from the ends.
    With that being said, (I am not sure of building martierials costs there, but priceing it out here in Maine a while back plywood for form and fibergass and cedar or other clear light rot resistent wood.) I do belive that you could build a copy of a HBfrieghter in stripwood for less money than then what they are getting for these canoes. I think I figured $1000 for all the martirealis. Like I said in the other post I do feel you give up a lot of strenth in a stripwood canoe compered to building other ways. I would incorparate keel, and splash rails going into transom for strenth and get some sort of back bone up in the stem too. Ok think I rambeled on long enough.-steve

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    According to the specs in Gil's book:
    The Grand Laker
    Length 19'-6"
    Width 45"
    Depth 18" (center)
    Height of stems 26"
    Approximate weight 135Lb
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  8. #8

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    Thanks again guys. I just went out and found gilpatricks book at the library. Whoda thunked it. Will search around the net and play around with adding depth, keel, stem and other mods to the design. Many say adding beam is a big no-no though.

    Now to mill some of that pile of cedar logs my arborist neighbor has piled in his back yard next to the chipper. He even marked some of the ones he knows are of good clear quality. They are leftovers from building his deck, shop and fence. Mill and dry and go from there.

    Thanks again for the help, will continue reading through these good forums.

  9. #9
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    Just for reference here is Gil's contact info, from the ME guides assn. I have found him to be very approachable person, I have bought most of his books, and even a used canoe from him years ago. I don't think he would mind someone changing one of the designs in his book, and would want to know how it turned out. I also sure he would give advice on the best changes he knows.

    I am not sure if we are allowed to post contact info, but it is available on the web in other places.
    Gil Gilpatrick, po box 461 skowhegan ME 04976,
    or e-mail at gil@gilpatrick.com

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