Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: keep or trade the 10mm

  1. #1

    Default keep or trade the 10mm

    I am making the move up north and I am paring down the gun collection. I have several handguns but they have all been for personal protection against dirt bags and not brown bears.

    What I would like to know: Should I keep my Auto Ordnance 1911 in 10mm or should I trade it off for a double action .44 mag?

  2. #2

    Default You're going to

    get various responses to this posting, my friend. Personally, I like a double action .44 revolver. Though there are lots of very reliable semi-autos about, I still like the cast iron reliability of a quality revolver like S&W or Ruger. It's pretty obvious that a .44 has more power than a 10 mike, using heavier bullets, but some people don't like the heavier recoil of a .44. For black bears, cougars and the proverbial dirtbags, a 10mm is fine, in my opinion, but for the bigger furries, I'll take the 44 or larger.

  3. #3
    Member sdi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    119

    Default ???

    10MM? 44MAG? I'd say make it a 454 or 500 s&w biger is better
    and i'd keep the 10MM (bring ammo with you)
    Scott

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default .44 Mag or better

    Trade the 10mm off for a .44 Mag or larger - it will bring more money there and a .44 Mag will probably be cheaper than up here. If you can find one get one of the lightweight ones - 629 PD - as an all round carry gun for 2 and smaller 4 legged varmits.

    For a serious woods gun the .500 S&W wil have to do until somone makes something more powerfull. If you can find one down south you may get a better deal than up here.


    Quote Originally Posted by sdi View Post
    10MM? 44MAG? I'd say make it a 454 or 500 s&w biger is better
    and i'd keep the 10MM (bring ammo with you)
    Scott
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  5. #5

    Default

    I can pick up a .500 for $700-$800. How many guys actually think that one needs to carry a cannon? I was hoping that the 10mm was good enough as I like it a lot, but had my suspicions that most would recommend that I move up. I just was not expecting that I needed to go that big.

  6. #6

    Default

    The 10mm is woefully underpowered for brown bear protection. You need a 44 magnum (minimum), or preferably something larger if you can handle the recoil. (like a 454 Casull, 460, or 500) The 454 and 460 have an advantage in that you can shoot 45 Colt ammo in them for target practice & plinking.

    Marshall/Ak

  7. #7

    Default oh heck no

    dont even buy that BS, to all those who replied 10mm isnt big enough...... how many of you have shot a Brownie on the charge? Odds are you will never need it, Its like insurance. Furthermore If you can shoot it well and its natural to you then keep the 10mm. No problems with it on black bear. Little light for coastals but honestly it will suffice for backup. Unless you plan on hunting Kodiak with a pistol I wouldnt sweat it. Check out heavy 10mm ballistics and you will realize It carrys some ***** as long as you do your part. Check out buffalo bore or Corbons and have a specail mag for bears. And if you fall for that trade in crap let me know, Id be happy to trade you for it...... And Ill carry the crap out of it to prove my point, hell I may even whack my next blacky over bait with it

  8. #8

    Default

    Klick, this is always a hotly debated topic on this board. You will get a lot of info as well as opinions. However, you may not get clarity concerning your question. For me, I like both guns and carry both depending on the situation. For day hikes away from streams where I don't really expect to encouters browns I carry a 10mm G20 with hot hardcasts. When I am in the thick stuff on a salmon stream where there is a expectation of an encouter I carry my 4" Redhawk suitably loaded. I'd keep them both, heck, at least sell it here as you can probably sell it easier and get more for it. Good luck.

  9. #9
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I own both and tend to carry my 10mm. On my recent Kodiak goat trip my 10mm still got the nod because it is easier to carry while back packing. I carry it packed w/ 200 grain hard cast from Double Tap. I plan on trying some of Double tap's 230's soon to see how they perform out of my pistol as well. Regardless of what anyone says you are best off with the firearm that you will actually have on you in the field. For me that is my 10mm it just wears more comfortable. A pistol under your seat in the truck will do you no good if you get into trouble in the woods!

  10. #10
    Member ironartist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Meadow Lakes
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    The only problem I have with a semi auto is carrying in the cold and shooting with a gloved hand, how many of you guys have practiced with gloves on. Well I got rid of my glock 10mm when I had to pick the cotton glove out of the slide Better that than what I would have been picking out of my shorts if I'd had a brownie breathing down my neck. Revolvers for me after that for packing in the woods
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
    Μολών λαβέ

  11. #11
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    JMHO but it would depend on when you gun was made.If its a newer one and you like it keep it. If its a twenty year old gun I would be suprised its still running and get rid of it.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    The issues are, Auto or Revolver, and power.

    I think it's powerful enough, with the correct ammo, so "I" wouldn't worry about that.

    If you trust the reliability of an Auto, and like it, might as well keep it.

    A revolver in nothing beeger than 44 Mag, would be a good choice, too.

    So the decision isn't a critical one.

    JMHO too.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  13. #13
    Member sdi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    119

    Default 500

    S&W 500 MAG! "GO BIG" the bears are!

  14. #14

    Default

    I`ve carried several big-bores and now carry a Glock 29. It`s what I carry all the time and feel confident with it which is most important to me. Afterall, the G29 is merely backup. It is also kind of hard to argue the capacity difference as well...15/16-230grain rounds is alot of punch. I think that ultimately most haven`t really tested 10mm and wouldn`t understand it`s strengths in penetration and bone breaking power. Keep in mind that if you do your part to avoid bears, they will avoid you.

  15. #15
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    My field guns are a S&W 460V (460mag) I pack for thicker brown bear country and an EAA Witness Match in 10mm the rest of the time. 10mm is not enough to cut it with a brown but for the far more likely trouble of an aggressive moose, person, or black bear it will do the trick adequately. However if I happen onto a bad problem with a brown when all I have is my 10mm I am sure to pump him full of 10ís and hope Iím lucky.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  16. #16

    Default Same here

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    My field guns are a S&W 460V (460mag) I pack for thicker brown bear country and an EAA Witness Match in 10mm the rest of the time. 10mm is not enough to cut it with a brown but for the far more likely trouble of an aggressive moose, person, or black bear it will do the trick adequately. However if I happen onto a bad problem with a brown when all I have is my 10mm I am sure to pump him full of 10ís and hope Iím lucky.
    I have both the 10mm and S&W 460. The 10mm gets most of the use due to the convenience. I am not going to be carrying the 460 when running ro biking (just too heavy), but when hunting/camping where I might be walking up on wounded game or dealing with bears moving in on game meat in camp, the 460 will be around. Consider it the "camp gun".

    Whatever you get, keep in mind it only does any good if you have it with you when you need it. If it is too big/bulky, odds are you will have it with you less thus the odds of having it when needed are reduced. A smaller gun that you have available is better than no gun for anything.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Whatever you get, keep in mind it only does any good if you have it with you when you need it. If it is too big/bulky, odds are you will have it with you less thus the odds of having it when needed are reduced. A smaller gun that you have available is better than no gun for anything.
    That's all true, and we hear it all the time, but it's our CHOICE, so the odds don't have to enter in to it.

    We can choose to carry a handgun, no matter how bulky, or heavy, it is.

    Actually, I've never based my decision on whether to pack a handgun, or no, based on how big it is. Currently, I'm relying on a 44 Mag. S&W, 6" barrel. I have 2 holsters, a hip holster, and a Guide's Choice Chest holster, and when I grab the gun, I decide which holster is best for the time.

    I can understand how one might choose a lighter gun, because he likes it, and figgers it's adequate, BUT I rebel at the mindset of "It's so heavy I'll probably leave it behind." "I need a lighter one, because I'm undependable."

    I have the 44, but sometimes I might take my 357 because it just appeals to me at the time. Besides, what's the use of owning a gun if you can't shoot it, carry it, or depend on it from time to time?

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    After hauling my second 100 plus pound load of goat meat and hide 3+ miles and thousands of vertical feet out of the mountains I was glad that I had my slim light 10mm on my chest rather than a heavy rifle which would have been strapped to my pack or a heavy bulky revolver. Never needed it but it gives you a bit more confidence busting through head high grass and thick brush on Kodiak to know you have something there more than your fists.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    It IS DEFINITELY a pain to pack a rifle, along with a load of meat on my back, but I do it for the first trip back to camp, whereupon I switch from rifle to handgun.

    The issue for me, is not the actual weight, but the fact that I have something else to hang onto, besides the pack straps.

    There's only 6 oz. diff in my 357 LOADED, and my 44 LOADED.

    (3 lbs. versus 3 lbs. 6 oz. Weighed on a Food Scale.)

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  20. #20
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    i aggree with lujon on the 10mm, as it was considered WAY TOO POWERFUL by the FBI, and discontinued for service.

    master guide phil shoemaker thinks a .357 magnum (with proper bullets) is adequate. he and his kids have a lot of experience with bears and believe it is more important to consider bullet placement than caliber.

    my grizzly 10mm is accurate, reliable, and very powerful offering a measure of security.

    don't underestimate this caliber.
    happy trails.
    jh

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •